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TFJ 2
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XMP files

Mar 9, 2013 9:34 PM

Nikon D7000 shooting Raw. When I download captures to bridge in CS6 I also get this .XMP file. How can I prevent this file from downloading? If the adjustment needs to be made in the camera I will follow up with Nikon, Thanks

 
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 10, 2013 12:03 AM   in reply to TFJ 2

    The xmp file is required. Any edits you do to a raw file, including all metadata are stored in the xmp file. As it is impossible to save to the raw file. To get around this, you can convert the raw files into DNG files, which will provide the same color depth but allows saving to the dng file. The DNG file can also embed the raw file if necessary. Adobe has a free DNG converter on their web site if this is of any interest to you.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 10, 2013 5:52 AM   in reply to TFJ 2

    You may not be aware that Adobe Camera RAW (ACR) does not read your in camera adjustments, it opens the RAW file using it's default values and settings.  The adjustments you make in ACR are saved either in the Photoshop database or XMP files depending on how you set the preferences.  They can only be saved in the RAW file if you use DNG files for you RAW images. 

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 17, 2013 9:40 AM   in reply to TFJ 2

    In Bridge if you click on Edit/Develpe settings you will see a number of options on what to do with the XMP files.  You can delete, restore, copy,etc. 

     

    Why would you want to delete them?  They only take a 2-3 KB of data which is nothing if the raw image is 20 MB.  If you do not want to see them in the thumbnails click View and uncheck "show hidden files".

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 17, 2013 8:42 PM   in reply to TFJ 2

    Correct, when they are hidden, they are never gone just not being displayed. If you are shooting raw files, it is important to keep the xmp files especially if you do any changes in camera raw or lightroom as those changes are stored in that xmp file.

     

    Something to keep in mind the raw files and dng files have a wider color gamet than the jpg file, the raw files are consider the same a negitive from a film camera in that it is an original file that can not be altered (or is vey difficult to) All edits to raw files are stored in the xmp file and therefore are non-destructive, the metadata for a dng file is stored in the dng file as is also non-destructive.

    Jpg do save file drive space, they are destructive each time the same file is resaved more data is lost. Jpg's do not have transparency. Jpg's can only have 8-bits per channel whereas raw files are usually over 32 bits per channel. Which make raw and dng better for hdr images.

     

    If you do need to save drive space, you may want to zip the raw or dng files and use a jpg for display, then when you need an original image just access the zip file. This is only a suggestion.

     

    Before deleting the raw files I do recommend that you at least burn them to a cd just in case. Once a jpg file is degraded enough without the raw or dng file, there is no getting it back.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 19, 2013 9:44 PM   in reply to TFJ 2

    There is no such thing as converting. Saving the file as a jpg, creates a new file that is not dependant of the raw file. So the raw file and xmp file still exist until you decide to delete it. Once you delete the raw file, unless you backed it up somehow, there is no way to recreate that raw file. Keeping the raw files on a camera card is considered a backup to what is on the computer simply because you can redownload it to the computer.

     
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  • Noel Carboni
    23,478 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 19, 2013 10:19 PM   in reply to TFJ 2

    I don't mean to make trouble, but bear in mind there's a Camera Raw option for avoiding creation of the XMP files and keeping the data in a central database instead.  It's the option I choose, since I don't like having Adobe writing stuff back into the places where I keep my image files.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 19, 2013 11:22 PM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    Sorry about that, I don't use that option so I tend to forget about it. I am stressing more about the point of keeping the raw files than I am about the xmp files. The size of xmp files don't really make sense to remove them unless drive space is a real premium, but any changes to the metadata would recreate that xmp file anyway. Or so I would assume. Unless you use the database. The difference being, a single file instead of multiple files, but would still end up using the same amount of drive space minus the difference in how well they compact.

    Also keep in mind if the database is corrupted, all the work done on all the raw files is compromised, whereas if a single xmp file is corrupted only that one raw file would need re-editing. But if backing up is done on a regular basis, that shouldn't be an issue, one would assume so anyway...

     
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  • Noel Carboni
    23,478 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 20, 2013 10:27 AM   in reply to Silkrooster

    Absolutely - never, ever, delete the raw files! 

     

    Photoshop's current converter, with the PV2012 engine, is testament to how much more one can get from a raw file today than ever before.  Consider this rescue:

     

    As the camera developed it (the embedded JPEG):

     

    FromJPEG.jpg

     

    As was possible to do starting with a Camera Raw 7 conversion:

     

    FromRaw.jpg

     

    The above is a bit overdone to prove a point, but it's getting to the point where I purposefully shoot photos in almost ludicrous lighting (e.g., the above shot, into the evening sun), knowing what I'll be able to do with them with Camera Raw.

     

    I have an old raw file of a small car (MG) I shot way back with my Canon EOS-10D, and every new version of Camera Raw that comes out I re-develop it to see just how good I can make it.  With the current version it came out better than ever - gone are color-fringing, noise issues, curvature, vignetting, pixelation, it's clearer than ever...  All I can say is I'm glad I still have every old raw file I ever shot.

     

    -Noel

     
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