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best graphics card with Prel11

Mar 19, 2013 8:55 AM

what would be a very good graphics card to use with Win7 64bit, Intel i5 CPu@2.67, and 12gb RAM and Asus P7P55D-e MotherBoard ?

i have a Nvidia GeForce 7600GT in now but am thinking that getting a better graphics card would help as i do get stuttering video at times.

 
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 19, 2013 9:03 AM   in reply to genesmachine

    I may well learn otherwise on this forum, but my reading in several places suggests that Premier Elements does not benefit much from graphics cards.  That territory is reserved for Premier Pro and its "Mercury Playback Engine".

     

    You might consider an SSD and use it to create specific project folders that hold both the project and asset files.

     

    Bill

     
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    Mar 19, 2013 9:25 AM   in reply to genesmachine

    What kind of video are you editing, and how many and what kind of hard drives do you have and where do you have your video files?

     

    Some kinds of video work much better with an i7 CPU, and you should have your video files on a 2nd hard drive, not your boot drive

     
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    Mar 19, 2013 9:37 AM   in reply to whsprague

    Bill,

     

    Those are my sentiments, as well.

     

    Any good, current video card, with at least 1GB VRAM, will do all that is needed for PrE. The biggest factor will be the video driver support, and nVidia is quite good in that respect. At least for now, it seems that AMD/ATI might be slipping a bit with regards to driver updates, but as I do not have any AMD/ATI cards, I have no direct experience. All of the comments on AMD/ATI come from reading the various Adobe forums.

     

    For any H.264 material, the video card will be way down the list, for performance enhancement. The CPU is the weakest link in editing that material. For other types of footage, the I/O (Input/Output, or drives and their controllers) will be most important. Behind those, CPU and I/O, installed RAM comes in next. The video card is behind those, and so long as it has at least 1GB VRAM and updated drivers, will be WAY behind on the scale of performance.

     

    Until PrE gets MPE/CUDA, more cores, and more VRAM, will not provide much bang for the buck. Now, PrPro DOES benefit, for some operations, from a "state-of-the-art" video card, but not PrE.

     

    Hunt

     
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    Mar 19, 2013 9:51 AM   in reply to John T Smith

    John T Smith wrote:

     

    What kind of video are you editing, and how many and what kind of hard drives do you have and where do you have your video files?

     

    Some kinds of video work much better with an i7 CPU, and you should have your video files on a 2nd hard drive, not your boot drive

    John,

     

    I've read in many places about the value of spreading out the workload on multiple drives.  I also think and read that the availabiltiy of SSDs may change the traditional formula.

     

    I have a new computer with two built in drives and two available external USB 3.0 drives.  I've tried various ways of spreading the work out, including having the video files on D:\ with the software on C:\. 

     

    My C:\ is a SSD.  No configuration worked faster than putting everything on the C:\ SSD in single project specific folders. 

     

    With plenty of memory and an i7, I can get 1:1 output rendering times in projects with one video track and not too many added effects, adjustments or transitions.  Even with those, it remains fast compared to what I read others have to do.

     

    Since entire projects are contained in a single folder it is easy to move or backup projects to a Blu-Ray disk or the external HDDs. 

     
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    Mar 19, 2013 10:16 AM   in reply to genesmachine

    genesmachine wrote:

     

    I do have an SSD.. how do i go about creatng those project folders that you are talking about?

    Use Windows Explorer to create a folder called "MyVacation".  Copy (not move) any assets, clips, music, etc into that folder.  Leave the orginals in their origanal location, assuming you have them organized by date, camera or something.  If you have a lot of clips, it can help to rename the copies for easy identification.

     

    When you open a "New Project" a box pops up asking you to name the project and I match the folder name.  Below it is a "Store In" selection with a browse button.  Pick the "MyVacation" folder.

     

    With PrE open and the project started, go to Preferences and make sure Edit>Preferences>Scratch Disks are all set to "Same as Project".  It is best to double check on each new project, because it seems PrE can be forgetful here!

     

    Now start "Getting Media" into your project and pick only items in "MyVacation".  If you discover you are missing something you want, go back to Windows Explorer and put a copy in "MyVacation".

     

    Granted, this may seem like a bit of extra trouble.  The payback is safeguarding originals, portability of projects, easy backup at the Windows level and SPEED if it is all done on an SSD.  For backup, it is an easy step to use Windows Explorer to copy the folder "MyVacation" to your external SSD as often and as frequently as you wish. 

     

    Since SSDs are smaller than HDDs, I reserve a space for graphic projects and move the project folder as necessary. 

     

    If you have an existing project and want to relocate it to your SSD, I suggest you read up on the "Archive" process.  One choice will save everything related to a project in a single file to some location like an external HDD.  Then it can be reopened in a new location on your SSD. 

     

    Alternatively, you can use windows explorer to move your project to the SSD.  But, when you open the project it will tell you that your assest files are missing.  There are menu choices provided that let you tell PrE where you put them and all will be well.  At first opening, some of the "preview renders" will have to be rewritten with a press of the Enter button where appropriate.

     

    Bill

     
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    Mar 19, 2013 10:11 AM   in reply to genesmachine

    Gene,

     

    Though it does not directly address your question about which drive to use (Bill has covered that well), this article gives tips on how I like to set up my Projects, and covers some pluses and minuses on doing it that way: http://forums.adobe.com/message/4028199#4028199

     

    Still, it should give you some tips on one method of set up.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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    Mar 19, 2013 10:48 AM   in reply to genesmachine

    genesmachine wrote:

     

    so whsprague,

    that sounds like something to try out. put all files on the SSD and do the project.. after project is all done move it to another drive for storage... is that what you are saying?

    Yes.  Put all the files in one folder named for the project.  Don't get them scattered or you'll gradually loose control over space management on your SSD.

     

    Repeating myself, the reasons are to take advantage of the SSD for rendering, transcoding or processing (what ever you want to call it) and to manage how your project files are collected, for backup or long term storage.

     
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    Mar 19, 2013 1:00 PM   in reply to whsprague

    One thing to be wary of is that an SSD, like all flash memory, has a limited number of writes. In normal use that is not likely to be a significant issue but using a disk intensive activity like a PRE project will reduce the lifespan of your SSD. The SSD manufacturer specification should give you the numbers (but how you relate that to real world lifespan is another question!).

     

    Cheers,
    --
    Neale
    Insanity is hereditary, you get it from your children

     
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    Mar 19, 2013 1:21 PM   in reply to nealeh

    Neale,

     

    That was certainly a point to consider, and especially with early SSD's. It appears that things have gotten better (as well as write speeds, which were once a sore spot with SSD's), as some extensive testing by one of the Photoshop "power" contributors indicate no issues on his benchtest machines, with millions of read/writes. However, I know that Noel Carboni is using Enterprise-level SSD's for his Photoshop testing, and also has them in RAID, so one's "mileage" might differ. Still, his tests indicate that SSD's might have finally arrived. I am still holding off for a bit more (maybe the next generation?).

     

    Hunt

     
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    Mar 19, 2013 2:28 PM   in reply to nealeh

    nealeh wrote:

     

    One thing to be wary of is that an SSD, like all flash memory, has a limited number of writes. ......

    So, if I spend $2800 on the top of the line Mac Book Pro with Retina Display I shouldn't expect it to last very long?

     

    It has not a single HDD, it is all SSD.

     
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