Skip navigation
LauraMacky
Currently Being Moderated

D7100 and Adobe Bridge

Mar 23, 2013 1:27 PM

Tags: #problem #cs5 #camera #bridge_cs5 #raw_images

I have a new Nikon D7100 and shot in camera raw as I used to with my D3000.  I transferred the photos and they showed up in adobe bridge as usual, however,  I can't see any of the photos and received this message:  

 

"Could not complete your request because the file appears to be from a camera model which is not supported by the installed version of Camera Raw.

Please visit the Camera Raw help documentation for additional information."

 

I then updated everything by going to updates in Photoshop and Adobe Bridge.  It said that it updated everything successfully, but I still can't see my photos in adobe bridge even though I reuploaded them from the SD card.  I still get the same message.   AFter the updates, I went and checked my versions for your information.  They are as follows:

 

Photoshop is CS5 extended V.12.0.4; Adobe Bridge V 4.0.5.11 (this is after all the updates I just ran)

 

Can someone please help me?  I'm dying to see my new pictures!   Oh, and btw....I tried changing the camera settings to shooting in jpeg (fine) and they did upload to bridge and I can see them.  This only seems to be affecting raw files.

 
Replies 1 2 Previous Next
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 23, 2013 5:14 PM   in reply to LauraMacky

    I do not see the D7100 listed in Adobe Camera RAw, so camera must be very new.  At any rate you will either need  to update CS6 so you can download ACR 7.x or download the free DNG converter.  But it appears you will have to wait until the ACR 7.4? comes out.

     

    In meantime you can view pictures as a jpeg or view them with Nikon NX2.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Omke Oudeman
    3,998 posts
    Nov 27, 2004
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 23, 2013 6:00 PM   in reply to Curt Y

    In meantime you can view pictures as a jpeg or view them with Nikon NX2.

     

     

    There is a second option, on Adobe Labs is the release candidate for ACR 7.4:

     

    http://labs.adobe.com/downloads/cameraraw7-4.html

     

    I can't find the specs for supported camera's but it is highly likely your brand new camera is already supported in this latest version.

     

    In earlier days this was a bigger problem because it could take about 3 months before the RAW format of the new camera was supported in ACR. The problem is that not only each vendor uses a different RAW format, they also change this code for each new dSLR they produce.

     

    Nowadays they do cooperate better with Adobe and provide preproduction or code (don't know which) and you can almost every time use the latest available ACR version for support for the latest dSLR.

     

    However, there is a but…

     

    You do own CS5 and ACR 7.xx is only supported by CS6.

     

    You can also download the free DNG converter RC 7.4 from Adobe Labs and convert the new files to the Adobe standard DNG. This wil let you use the files in your current system.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 24, 2013 10:35 AM   in reply to LauraMacky

    Nikon should support DNG, as should Canon. It's their fault.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Omke Oudeman
    3,998 posts
    Nov 27, 2004
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 24, 2013 12:58 PM   in reply to LauraMacky

    I tried Adobe's DNG Converter and it still will not recognize my Raw files

     

     

    I tried to find info about the D7100 and it seems you are out of luck at this moment, see also this link:

     

    http://nikonrumors.com/2013/03/14/adobe-photoshop-camera-raw-7-4-relea se-candidate-does-support-the-nikon-d7100.aspx/

     

    As 7.4 is still a release candidate and therefor in fact still Beta there is a slight chance you can use the official released version of ACR 7.4 but otherwise you have to wait a few months for the next release of ACR of DNG

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Omke Oudeman
    3,998 posts
    Nov 27, 2004
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 24, 2013 12:58 PM   in reply to Yammer

    Nikon should support DNG, as should Canon. It's their fault.

     

     

    hear, hear

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 25, 2013 9:17 AM   in reply to LauraMacky

    I searched a little on this as I also own a D7100. It seems that at this time, March 25th, we have to change the exif to say that our camera is a D3200 or other supported camera.

    MM

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 25, 2013 10:08 AM   in reply to LauraMacky

    You'll have to find an exit editor in the App Store if you have a Mac otherwise I'm not sure where to get one for a PC. It shouldn't take too long for Adobe to update Camera Raw and Lightroom for our cameras. Until then I am just shooting jpeg.

    MM

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 25, 2013 10:15 AM   in reply to Mikdotmin

    Mikdotmin wrote:

     

    It shouldn't take too long for Adobe to update Camera Raw and Lightroom for our cameras. Until then I am just shooting jpeg.

    You could shoot Raw+JPG, and go back to the Raw files when Adobe updates CR. It shouldn't be long now anyway.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 25, 2013 10:55 AM   in reply to Yammer

    Thanks, that's a good idea.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 25, 2013 11:10 AM   in reply to LauraMacky

    LauraMacky wrote:

     

    I did hear one disconcerting thing, though.  Someone said that even when they update camera raw for the D7100 that it will only work with CS6?  I have CS5 and really am hoping that statement is not correct.

    No, that's correct. They will only update Camera Raw 7+.

     

    They will also update Lightroom and DNG Converter at the same time. DNG Converter is free, and it will make copies of your NEF files as DNG files, which can be opened in CS5. It's not ideal, but it's free. Nikon should be supplying DNG files in the first place.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Omke Oudeman
    3,998 posts
    Nov 27, 2004
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 25, 2013 11:31 AM   in reply to Mikdotmin

    It seems that at this time, March 24th, we have to change the exif to say that our camera is a D3200.

     

    Little do I know about demosaicing (needed to translate the Raw data in to color data) but if your method would work this would mean both camera use the same sensor, software and algorithm etc.

     

    Otherwise the results may differ from the original purpose of the new camera. I don't think that directly would mean that red would be appearing as green (… ) but it is something to consider in this decision.

     

    If you can be a little patient the problem will be solved in the correct way.

     

    And yes, Yammer has a point but regarding the early days we have made a lot of progress because at that time every new camera that was released had to wait at least 3 month for an upgraded ACR because Adobe had no access to either camera data nor pre production models.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 25, 2013 12:41 PM   in reply to Yammer

    I can't seem to open my D7100 Nef files even w/ CS6.  Says that  my files aren't supported and to try to upgrade (I have the latest version) and when you click to look a the supported camera files the D7100 is not listed

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 25, 2013 12:47 PM   in reply to JenSkiPhoto

    JenSkiPhoto wrote:

     

    I can't seem to open my D7100 Nef files even w/ CS6.  Says that  my files aren't supported and to try to upgrade (I have the latest version) and when you click to look a the supported camera files the D7100 is not listed

    That's because it isn't supported yet. You have read this discussion, right?

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 25, 2013 12:53 PM   in reply to Yammer

    Yes, I see it now but I was on the phone with an adobe rep yesterday who told me it was....I guess I believed him and shouldn't have.  I thought just maybe they had just realeased the update.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 25, 2013 12:57 PM   in reply to JenSkiPhoto

    JenSkiPhoto wrote:

     

    Yes, I see it now but I was on the phone with an adobe rep yesterday who told me it was....I guess I believed him and shouldn't have.  I thought just maybe they had just realeased the update.

    The rep was wrong. I think there was a bit of confusion at Adobe, because it was claimed that the release candidate of 7.4 on the Labs website had D7100 support, until someone pointed out this was wrong.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 25, 2013 1:28 PM   in reply to LauraMacky

    LauraMacky wrote:

     

    I'm hoping I don't have to purchase the cloud crap to get the upgraded CS6 version.  I'm waiting until I find out when exactly the D7100 is supported, but this whole cloud stuff is not good news to me.

    No. Camera Raw is updated roughly four times a year, and is usually preceded by a release candidate by about a month. We've had the RC for about a month.

     

    They used to provide a download, but now they expect you to be connected to the net, and update CS6 using Help > Updates. Expect a Camera Raw update to be available in a few days. I don't know if the D7100 will be in it, as it wasn't in the RC, but I'd be surprised if it wasn't.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Pierre Courtejoie
    7,038 posts
    Jan 11, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 26, 2013 3:43 AM   in reply to LauraMacky

    But you could still download the demo once 7.4 is released, as sometimes, there is preliminary support.

    (In that case, it is not listed as supported, but might be in the early stages of support, and QA has not validated it yet.)

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 26, 2013 9:22 AM   in reply to LauraMacky

    Firstly, you won't get a D7100 update for CS5. That ship has sailed.

     

    Camera Raw is currently officially at 7.3 for CS6. You can also download 7.4 RC from Adobe Labs, but it is unsupported. I read that D7100 was supported in the RC, but that was later retracted. So I guess it isn't.

     

    As well as Camera Raw, Lightroom and DNG Converter are updated. DNG Converter is a free stand-alone program which creates DNG raw files from your new camera, which can then be opened in older unsupported versions of Photoshop.

     

    None of this has anything to do with the Cloud version of Creative Suite. You have to actively buy into this licensing method. So if you're not on Cloud now, you won't ever be. After all, how will they get your cash?

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 26, 2013 9:01 AM   in reply to LauraMacky

    I forgot to say: you used to be able to get Camera Raw updates in two different ways...

     

    1. In any CS application, click Help > Updates, and follow prompts to update your software automatically.

     

    2. You could visit the Adobe website Downloads section, look for Camera Raw, download the appropriate update, then install it manually. They stopped this a few months ago with 7.2, without saying why.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 26, 2013 10:23 AM   in reply to LauraMacky

    The DNG dowload will still not work with the D7100 until ACR 7.x supports it.  If 7.4 does not you will have to wait until 7.5.  In the meantime just upgrade to CS6 so you will be up to speed with it by the time it comes out.

     

    If you want to view the RAW images while waiting for the correct ACR you will have to use the software that came with camera. 

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Omke Oudeman
    3,998 posts
    Nov 27, 2004
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 26, 2013 3:03 PM   in reply to LauraMacky

    Preliminary support for CS5?  Even if that's so, eventually I will need to upgrade to CS6 if the camera is not supported in CS5 in the end.  As long as I don't have to cloud it, I'm fine.  LOL!   I love my apple cloud for music, documents, etc.  But I really don't want to pay a monthly cost for a program I already have.

     

    Although I can imagine your feelings I would like to explain a bit of my thoughts about these issues.

     

    As long as the Raw problem for new dSLR is going on (way back to the start of this millennium…) there has been a lot of strong opinions about it. Some correct, some not.

     

    However beside there are enough points to criticize Adobe, when it comes to ACR policy there is not much to get angry about to my opinion

     

    1- they have started the open format called DNG and everyone is free to to use its converter. So in theory you could use a brand new dSLR (in your case with a bit of extra patience) and download the latest free DNG converter that supports your raw format and use the converted DNG file in say ACR in PSCS 2. In other words, this get's you the option to use brand new digital format in almost pre historic software

     

    2- They provide a free update for ACR with the newest dSLR every 3 to 4 months a year for their latest version of PS, sometimes when your lucky in between transition to new PS version they also update both ACR for latest PS and provide a final update for PS one version back.

     

    Given the fact that it is a lot of work ( check also this site with the long list of supported camera's : http://helpx.adobe.com/creative-suite/kb/camera-raw-plug-supported-cam eras.html ) to get hold of every new camera and create the correct profiles for it to work in ACR it still is a free update for owners of the latest PS version.

     

    If we put aside a lot of reasonable/unreasonable discussions about big companies making big money you honestly can't blame them for not putting that effort in their older software, everyone has to earn a living.

     

    Photoshop is also a profesional set of tools with many, many options to get your work done. They do provide Adobe Elements (around $ 100) with a similar but not the same ACR option and also Adobe Lightroom (around $ 150) that has the same ACR engine in a slightly different interface.

     

    Most dSLR that are being used for pro / semi pro and serious amateur use start at about 1000 to 1500 dollar and run to very high amounts (I recently bought the Canon 1Dx) so one would expect that a photographer serious about getting a very good dSLR should also be keen on the best options for software to get the most out of it.

     

    Again personally I was not keen on the changing upgrade policy for Adobe to change the upgrade policy. First you where able to change to CS1 from PS 1, meaning once bought a version of PS you could upgrade always to the latest version no matter what prior version you owned.

    Then around CS2 I believe they changed it to only upgrade from 3 version back (which for me is reasonable)

     

    Last year they changed it to only one version back. Running a small business myself I always used PS upgrades (I skipped CS5.5 but that was more a luxury update) and I also did profit from more stability, speed and some options as well as ever improved ACR process. But for some it might be a bit to much with only 1 version update.

     

    On the other hand an update for PS was not all that much money, compared to complete Suite Updates PS was already an exception with same upgrade price for 3 versions, most Suites had different (higher) pricing for older versions.

     

    And now we have the Creative Cloud. Whether we like it or not, it seems Adobe is heading to this direction and already 500.000 subscribers have joined permanent:

     

    http://blogs.adobe.com/jnack/2013/03/half-a-million-people-now-subscri bing-to-creative-cloud.html

     

    And it also seems not only a new profit model has been at the base of this, also the ever increasing market of software piracy was a big reason to change to this new way of working.

     

    Again personally I'm still a bit ambivalent about the CC depending on future planning for it. But currently I have a subscription to the CC (the first year offer was unbelievable low priced) and have access to the latest versions of almost all Adobe products for 35 dollar a month and when continuing for only 50 dollar a month.

     

    I say 'only' knowing that not everyone will be agreeing with this but for me having predictable monthly cost and access to the complete Master Collection (including LightRoom, Premiere Pro, InDesign and Illustrator). I primarily use PS and Bridge but have some need for ID and Illustrator. By far not enough to buy a whole Suite or the individual application so for me this is a perfect solution to have access for a fair price.

     

    There seems to be a route (search for educational) to subscribe to only PS in the CC and that seems around 20 dollar a month. I know the idea of hire software is a bit strange but according to the legal agreements we all click on for granted upon install also state you do not own the software your self but bought the right to use it

     

    And to end this very long story, be aware that once CS7 is available on the market you loose your right to upgrade from CS5 and need to buy a full version, and as for CS6, the new 2012 ACR process that came with CS6 is worth alone the upgrade price to my opinion

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 27, 2013 12:22 AM   in reply to LauraMacky

    LauraMacky wrote:

     

    One question I have....if I purchased Lightroom (once they come out with the version that supports my camera raw format), do I still need to upgrade to CS6?

    Technically, you don't need to buy anything. Once DNG Converter supports the D7100, you can use that for free, and convert your NEF files to DNG, to be opened in CS5.

     

    If you wanted the latest features of ACR 7, you could either upgrade to CS6, or buy Lightroom 4. Lightroom 4 uses the same software "engine" as ACR 7, but with a different user interface. I'm personally not a fan, but lots of people love it. You can process raw files in Lightroom, and then export them to Photoshop CS5.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Omke Oudeman
    3,998 posts
    Nov 27, 2004
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 27, 2013 2:17 AM   in reply to LauraMacky

    As you can see, I'm not quite sure about Lightroom as I've never used it.  I always use Adobe Bridge and open my photos in camera raw there, then open in CS5.  I'm trying to spend the least amount of money possible, but it sounds like I will have to upgrade to CS6 anyway, even if I get the latest version of Lightroom.  Is that true?

     

     

    You should ask yourself the question what you do need for process in your photo's. Like Yammer and others on this forum we are no big fan of Lightroom but that doesn't mean you can't use it.

     

    In itself it is a widely used application amongst photographers and it does have a lot of options to get a result. It only needs a bit of study but that can be said for most of the applications.

     

    So if you use PS for a limited usage and don't have the need for adjustment layers, channel masks and other sophisticated stuff that you can use in Photoshop you also should ask yourself if having an application with so much tools and options (it has a reason PS being a bit pricy…) is overkill for your work and needs or does it has vital parts for your workflow.

     

    In the latter you should start saving for the upgrade, in the first you should consider a switch to Lightroom or Photoshop Elements. And of course there is the option Yammer already offered, use the free DNG converter and stick with CS5.

     

    Options, options, there are to many options and choices one has to make in live…

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Omke Oudeman
    3,998 posts
    Nov 27, 2004
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 27, 2013 5:10 AM   in reply to LauraMacky

    I remember once I tried dng and I can't remember why I didn't like it.  It's why I haven't been thinking I wanted to go with that option.

     

     

    We are getting a bit of topic but I know there are some strong opinions about DNG, however I believe I started using them already 4 or 5 years ago. I tried a few times to spot difference between the dng-converted CR2 (I use Canon) and the original CR2 file and I tried it al pixel peeping level with eye dropper tool and info panel but have not been able to see any difference.

     

    The 2 greatest advantages for me are:

     

    1: all edits in ACR and Bridge metadata are saved in the DNG file itself and there is no need for XMP side car files that can be lost etc.

    2: it result in a slightly smaller size (it saves about 10% compared to the original Raw file size which is usually round 25 MB) While Space is not really an issue with todays HD prices you can use it also 10% longer with DNG before the disk gets full.

     

    And while this might not be a real issue in short term, there are already a few older file types from the past century that are not longer supported. Adobe does keep supporting DNG because they have created this itself, given the current amount of different file types from the already supported cameras it is not unlikely to expect that they are not keeping on doing so for a large number of years and eventually will clean up the list a bit.

     

    So when we are say 20 years ahead it might be that my first digital Raw files from the Canon 30D (2001) can't be handled by the then probably version 27 of PS.

     

    This would mean I would have to keep older software and also older computers to ensure being able to handle those old files, the changes that I can still use the old DNG files with the current software and system are a lot more logical to my opinion.

     

    And while we can't look in the future (maybe in 30 years time we only have to blink with our eyes and a chip attached to our brain sends this perfect eye-matching image to the cloud…) but also still then I might want have access to the older files

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Noel Carboni
    23,456 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 27, 2013 9:00 AM   in reply to LauraMacky

    LauraMacky wrote:

     


    I remember once I tried dng and I can't remember why I didn't like it.  It's why I haven't been thinking I wanted to go with that option.

     

    Creating DNG files involves going through an extra step - something that probably could be automated pretty easily, but an extra step nonetheless.

     

    Also, Adobe writes development parameters back into DNG files.  That means your DNG file isn't entirely a pristine copy of what the DNG converter first delivered, but is re-written and re-written every time you develop it into an image.  That's not to say the pixel data is changed - it's not - the image doesn't degrade, BUT...  When a file is re-written there is a small chance it (or things nearby) can be corrupted due to a software, computer system glitch, or power failure.  What this means in a practical sense is that if you really, really do want exactly what your camera delivered preserved, you will want to consider keeping (and protecting) your original raw files AS WELL AS creating DNG files.  This isn't necessarily a bad thing - it might even give you additional options in the future if you're trying to recover from a failure - but it does take extra storage space (essentially double).

     

    -Noel

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Omke Oudeman
    3,998 posts
    Nov 27, 2004
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 27, 2013 10:30 AM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    Creating DNG files involves going through an extra step - something that probably could be automated pretty easily, but an extra step nonetheless.

     

     

    Using Photodownloader makes it a bit easier, it has options to convert to DNG, rename the file, adding a metadata template and make a back up of the original Raw file.

     

    The other option is to change the option to include the original Raw file in the DNG file itself, this almost doubles the size of the DNG and you need enough speed and space for this.

     

    I can't contradict to Noel his statement because it is true, but as long as I am using this I never came across this because I was always able to revert a DNG back to the default settings.

     

    It all depends on your needs and wishes. I always make a back up of my originals but only for security of the first process. When my DNG's are finally processed I archive the rest of the DNG material from that session and once in a while I dump the older original Raw copies.

     

    We do have a lot more options to chose from then in the analog days, once scratching a negative or slide you where in big trouble, wrong storage and an incorrect developing or to short rinse with water was also key for failure on the long term.

     

    In the digital world we have better and more options but eventually you have to acknowledge that whatever you try to avoid, Murphy is still there and S**T still seems to happen…

     
    |
    Mark as:
1 2 Previous Next
Actions

More Like This

  • Retrieving data ...

Bookmarked By (0)

Answers + Points = Status

  • 10 points awarded for Correct Answers
  • 5 points awarded for Helpful Answers
  • 10,000+ points
  • 1,001-10,000 points
  • 501-1,000 points
  • 5-500 points