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WIBoiler69
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Tips for importing large JPEGs into PE

Mar 24, 2013 6:29 PM

The short version of my question is that I am looking for the most efficient way to import a large number of very large JPEG still photos (with various pixel dimensions) into a Premiere Elements project with the best resulting image quality possible.  I have been frustrated so far with the resulting image quality.

 

Here’s some more detail.  I am brand new to PE.  I’m using PE 11 on Windows Vista.  I had been putting up with Windows Movie Maker for many years, but finally threw in the towel due to its ungraceful handling of AVCHD video.  I want to combine still photos with my home movie video in my projects and create DVDs for playback on an NTSC widescreen HDTV.

 

My JPEG still photos come from several different cameras, and I do a lot of cropping.  So the pixel dimensions vary quite a bit.  The uncropped pixel size from my DSLR is 4000x6000, so they are too big to import into PE.  I read that a good approach was to create a slide show in Organizer and import this into PE.  I used Organizer to create a WMV video slideshow with the highest quality settings.  The WMV video doesn’t look too bad when I play it back on my PC.  But I notice a significant degradation in image quality when I preview the WMV file in PE (compared to playing the file on my PC).  The resulting quality of a published DVD is even worse (played on either TV/DVD or PC).  PE selected HD 1080i, 1920x1080 for my project.

 

I know PE is not designed for still photo slideshows.  I’m not expecting the same quality as the original JPEGs, but I think I can do better than what I am seeing so far.  Any suggestions, tips, or links to reference articles would be greatly appreciated.  I’ve also read about resizing the stills in Photoshop (I have Elements 11) and then importing into PE.  I haven’t tried this yet, but this sounds like a lot of work (even with batch processing) due to all the different pixel dimensions I have with my photos.

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 24, 2013 7:03 PM   in reply to WIBoiler69

    Well, several users insist that the quality is just great, if one Imports all the untouched Still Images into PrE, and then use them, just as they come in, letting PrE do all of the Scaling. They claim that the results are as good, or better, than processing the Stills in Photoshop.

     

    I still think that Scaling in Photoshop (and especially if one has PS CS 6), and then Importing into PrE is a better way to go, and for several reasons.

     

    However, in deference to the other users, try Importing the Stills into a Project, either set up to the desired output settings, or to any Video, that you have, and test.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 24, 2013 7:24 PM   in reply to WIBoiler69

    This article has suggestions for doing batch Scaling in both PS and PSElements: http://forums.adobe.com/message/2200755#2200755

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 24, 2013 8:12 PM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    Bill Hunt wrote:

     

    Well, several users insist that the quality is just great, if one Imports all the untouched Still Images into PrE, and then use them, just as they come in, letting PrE do all of the Scaling. They claim that the results are as good, or better, than processing the Stills in Photoshop.

     

     

    That would mostly be me.  I have a new computer with a lot of processing power and a very fast SSD.  I have provided examples where I ignored all the adivice about rescaling still photos. 

     

    My results may not be satisfactory to all. 

     

    But, my point has been that with a strong computer, PrE 11 seems capable of processing unscaled, and even RAW, still photos into suitable HD TV quality videos. 

     

    If the computer is not strong, results may be unsatisfactory.

     

    Bill

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 25, 2013 6:11 AM   in reply to whsprague

    No super comp here, but letting Pre 11 do the scaling (resizing) has worked quite well for me also, ... until recently it just quit doing it.  Now have to resize within the project.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 26, 2013 8:06 AM   in reply to WIBoiler69

    You are correct, in that Adobe engineers have never addressed Scaling in PrE, at least not that I have seen.

     

    In PrPro, it was better to do the Scaling in Photoshop, up until things changed with CS 5. With the inclusion of full CUDA support from the GPU, Adobe was able to actually write Scaling algorithms for PrPro, that were actually better, than the ones in PS. Todd Kopriva spent a lot of time educating the PrPro Forum about those changes. Now, one still had the resources issues with many large Still Images, but PrPro's Scaling changed a lot of things.

     

    I would love to hear the specifics from Adobe, regarding PrE.

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 26, 2013 3:12 PM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    When I used to use PE in the past, scaling large camera pix was by far one of the most important things to know as a video beginner.  Now that I use Premiere Pro CS6,  I use the batch function in Photoshop first to scale a folder of my camera JPGs into smaller PSD files and then I use the PSD files in Premiere Pro, adjusting them as I go.   Always works like a charm, but I learned about these ideas originally from Hunt and Steve.

     

    I do find it's not obvious to know what to do with camera pictures for video newbies.   My Sony cyber-shot camera is 16.2 MP and the pictures are huge in bytes.  I know how to work with them by converting but the beginner would just import those huge files into PE or PrPro without thinking.   And it seems new cameras keeping going up in mega-pixels!  hehe

     

    Peter

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 26, 2013 3:37 PM   in reply to P_Forrest

    A few weeks ago this same subect was being discussed.  Taking Bill Hunt's and other's advice, I spent the larger part of a day trying it out.  As near as I can tell, I followed Bill's advice carefully.  I put together a demo video and posted it on Vimeo where viewers can download the original PrE11 output for examination.   As I recall it was a long thread and by the time I posted the video interest was dying. 

     

    Here it is again:  https://vimeo.com/60952115

     

    It is only my personal experience, but resizing provided no advantage or disadvantage.

     

    As another test I made a short video of about a half dozen random RAW photos and posted to Vimeo.  I used no resizing and, to my eye, results are fine.   Watch or download here:  https://vimeo.com/60904593

     

    Maybe the Adobe engineers have quietly put something into Premier Elements to resize, or somehow process, photos.  I do know that when it was time to upgrade to ACR 7.2, and later 7.3, for Photoshop Elements, the automatic Adobe downloader/installer reported it updated ACR in Premier Elements.  ACR does not process videos.  It is for photos and is in PrE11.

     

    Bill S

     
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