Skip navigation
benevident
Currently Being Moderated

Printing high quality rasterized text from Photoshop CS5.1 to InDesign CS5.5

Mar 25, 2013 12:45 PM

I’m planning on using Photoshop CS5.1 to modify preexisting music notation fonts (MusiSync and StaffClefPitchesEasy) for my own purposes. With that said, in order to make my modifications I have to rasterize the font. Once I’ve completed my alterations I plan to then place my new images into InDesign CS5.5 at the same image/ canvas size as I had created them in Photoshop. My question is: At what ppi should I create my Photoshop documents and what file type should I ‘save as’ to place in InDesign, so that my end result using InDesign, when printed buy a professional printing house, will look crisp and clean with no jagged edges, blur or pixilation? Also, I am using a mac running 10.5.8 and my Photoshop and ID documents are in greyscale. Thanks for your help.

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 25, 2013 1:06 PM   in reply to benevident

    Why do you have rasterize it? Leave it as live type and save as PDF. Place that in InDesign.

     

     

     

    Bob

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 25, 2013 1:43 PM   in reply to benevident

    Seems like a font editor might be more appropriate...

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 25, 2013 2:07 PM   in reply to benevident

    Most of the musical notation fonts I have had to deal with are pretty restrictive as regards modifying fonts. Check with the source of the fonts.

     

    Fontlab is the best. For easy changes, TypeTool (same company) might be OK. Least expensive but works great is Type 3.2 from CR8.

     

    TypeTool (and Fontlab) will allow a better workflow between Illustrator and it because it can read the Adobe clipboard and so:

     

    1. Open a particular character in TypeTool
    2. Use the pointer tool to drag around all the nodes
    3. Copy (ctrl+c)
    4. Paste into Illustrator
    5. Alter the character
    6. Copy character in Illustrator
    7. Delete the old character in Type Tool
    8. Paste the new character from Illustrator.
    9. Position the new character if needed (usually is)
    10. Generate the new OTF or TT
    11. Unload the present font
    12. Load the new font

     

    Pretty much that's it (off the top of my head, anyway).

     

    Take care, Mike

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 25, 2013 2:51 PM   in reply to benevident

    Ok. If you don't have a significant number of changes, use Photoshop. cmyk (use black only) document or grayscale. Setup PS to the size needed @ 300 dpi. Link to the PSD files you will be creating in ID.

     

    Where the font editor comes in is with X number of changes you need to make and repetitive use down the road. Above a certain number of changes, the font editor would pay for itself in the time it takes to learn to use it. Without Illustrator or another vector editing software, it is moot. The free InkScape (OpenSource) can make the changes, but it adds the step of exporting to SVG and importing it. I cannot remember if InkScape can export as EPS, but that is what you are limited to in TypeTool. However, Type 3.2 uses SVG for its import so they seem a good fit.

     

    Good luck, Mike

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 25, 2013 3:09 PM   in reply to MW Design

    I'm not sure I agree with that. I'd use bitmap mode, and a minimum of 1200 ppi at the size the glyph will be used.

     

    The problem here is that fonts are really miniature programs, glyphs are vectors so they are scalable, they probably have hinting (similar to an anti-aliasing effect) to make them look better and the font calculates things like spacing between glyphs. You lose all of that when you rasterize, and each glyph will need to be palced as a graphic. You'll no longer be able to "type" your score.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 25, 2013 3:52 PM   in reply to benevident

    1200 ppi is the minimum effective resolution I would send to press for 1-bit lineart to avoid jaggies.  Effective resolution is the resolution at the size you are printing, rather than the 'actual' resolution, which is the figure saved inthe file at the dimensions you specified.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 25, 2013 4:34 PM   in reply to benevident

    Yes.

     

    Bob

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 25, 2013 11:42 PM   in reply to benevident

    I worked in music publishing for around 9 years, so I may be able to offer an opinion or two. Can you post an image of one of the examples you would like to create? Even something that mixes what you made on the computer with hand-drawn corrections will give me an idea of what you're doing. When I see what you're after, I can give you my 2¢.

     
    |
    Mark as:

More Like This

  • Retrieving data ...

Bookmarked By (0)

Answers + Points = Status

  • 10 points awarded for Correct Answers
  • 5 points awarded for Helpful Answers
  • 10,000+ points
  • 1,001-10,000 points
  • 501-1,000 points
  • 5-500 points