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AVCHD files, Premiere Elements 10, and a Mac - will it work?

Mar 27, 2013 7:00 AM

Hi all,

 

I just bought a Sony HDR-CX220 camcorder (for simple home-movie stuff).  I've been working with Premiere Elements 10 with my Canon DSLR and other camcorders, but not HD camcorders.

 

I just found out there might be a problem.  Can I import the AVCHD 2.0 files (1920 x 1080 60p) into PE 10, work with them, and then export in an HD file (either MP4 or blu-ray)?

 

Did I just make a mistake buying this camera?

 

(I have a MacBook Pro 2010 with Mountain Lion and all updates.)

 

 

Thank you for any and all help.  I'm literate at computers and still photography, but I have a hard time with video, so go easy on me! 

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 27, 2013 7:19 AM   in reply to PekMark

    Nope. This is an excellent camcorder, and Premiere Elements will interface perfectly with it in AVCHD mode.

     

    The only challenge I could find is that your camcorder shoots in 1920x1080 at 60p, a format that version 10 does not support. If your camcorder has the option to shoot in 60i, though, you can do that and your results should be excellent.

     

    Otherwise, version 11 support 1920x1080 60p AVCHD.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 27, 2013 8:16 AM   in reply to PekMark

    That's up to you.

     

    If you're going to output DVDs or video for the web, shooting in 60p is pretty much irrelevant, since your output will only be 30 fps anyway. (60i is 60 frames, interlaced to produce 30 fps.)

     

    What do you plan to do with your video after you edit it?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 27, 2013 8:18 AM   in reply to PekMark

    I bought a 1080p60 AVCHD camcorder when PrE9 was current and made it work.  I upgraded to 10 and experimented with project presets that would work with p60.  I found I got smooth and consistent editing with a project preset of 720p60.  At output different presets were selected as needed.  

     

    I was repeatedly informed here and elsewhere that is was not supposed to work and I was just short of rude by insisting it did!

     

    I have upgraded to 11 primarily because of the full and official 1080p60 support that is included.  I recommend you do so as well. 

     

    Its interface changes enough that you will have a short learning curve.  Watch Steve G's free 8 part video course at his muvipix.com site and the learning will be short.  If you have not mastered PrE yet, watch his full, in depth, course at lynda.com.

     

    Bill

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 27, 2013 9:03 AM   in reply to Steve Grisetti

    Steve Grisetti wrote:

     

    That's up to you.

     

    If you're going to output DVDs or video for the web, shooting in 60p is pretty much irrelevant, since your output will only be 30 fps anyway. (60i is 60 frames, interlaced to produce 30 fps.)

     

    What do you plan to do with your video after you edit it?

    With all due respect Steve, it is relevant to shoot at 60p.  The idea is to capture as much light and color data technically possible even if the first goal is to only upload a clip to YouTube.  Later goals may include making a documentary of a child growing up to watch on a huge TV.  At that time, the owner of such a capable video camera would look back and say, "Why was I so stupid to record everything at lower quality settings."

     

    Looking at it another way, the OP is a primary consumer.  Not everyone is spending money now.  The OP is.  The OP has as a MacBook Pro, not a cheap PC.  (Retna display?) He has a Canon DSLR which perhaps is a "5 D III".  He just bought one of the best consumer camcorders Sony has ever made.  We should bet he has an HD TV (or 3) and a few Blu-Ray players too.  Don't tell him to put snow tires on his Porche.  Help him get the performance he is spending money on.

     

    The OP's new camcorder is only one example of a broad range of Sony and Panasonic camcorders and cameras that shoot AVCHD in 60p.  In fact, if anyone is spending consumer cash on a camera now, it is hard to not get 60p capability -- even with point-n-shoots.  Consumers are studying the reviews and product descriptions on Amazon, buying into 60p capability.  Do you really want to tell them to use their new gear to make SD DVDs?  Help them get the high performance they are buying into. 

     

    Steve, on your website or in your books, do you have featured articles focused on how to get stunning picture quality on your new HD TV with your new camcorder?  Do you explain how to get 60p output from PrE11 to match the 60p input?  Do you tell them how to actually play raw, or editited, 60p files on their TVs?

     

    Again, with due respect for all that you have accomlished, it frequently seems you focus on getting legacy gear to work.  The money spenders are replacing their legacy gear. 

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 27, 2013 10:06 AM   in reply to whsprague

    Well said, Bill.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 27, 2013 10:11 AM   in reply to Steve Grisetti

    Thanks.  I was hoping not to make you mad.  I am a fan, like your teaching and am enjoying one of your books.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 27, 2013 10:21 AM   in reply to whsprague

    I'm still learning myself, Bill. And real world experience is the best teacher.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 27, 2013 3:44 PM   in reply to Steve Grisetti

    Steve Grisetti wrote:

     

    ....And real world experience is the best teacher.

    My real "video world" started with a Panasonic camcorder that records AVCHD 1080p60 on an SD card.  My first computer for video had an i5 and 8GB memory.  It was a little slow with the big files so I upgraded to i7, 16GB, SSD, Nvidia card and Blu-Ray burner.  So my real world has never experienced DV, Mini DV, tape or firewire capture.  I've added two more amazing camera/camcorders and mix the clips routinely in PrE11.

     

    I enjoy reading lots of reviews and keep up on a couple of forums.  I enjoy keeping up on what the consumer electronics industry is doing to find ways to get people to buy their products.  It amazes me that, based on reviews, forums and personal experience the video camera of choice right now is a Panasonic LX7 point-n-shoot that sells for $400.  YouTube and Vimeo examples keep proving nothing can make better picture quality below the $1500 price point. 

     

    The "real world" now for video consumers now is making exquisite videos for their HD TVs with $400 cameras and $90 software.   For another $100 you can get a Sony camera that has the 35mm equivalent of a 1,000 mm zoom lens, is stabilzied and takes 1080p60 video of humming birds a long ways away that can be slowed in PrE11 with incredible big screen quality.  This is consumer stuff!  http://www.youtube.com/watch?&v=BVDt8sSyRiE

     

    I inadvertently retired when people stopped buying the expensive toys I was selling.  So, I have had lots of time to figure out what and how to use current "state of the art" consumer grade equipment.  Except once, I have not made a DVD.  (It was for an outdated relative.)

     

    Beyond the narrowly defined range of "current equipment", I can offer little help.  I've learned how to edit losslessly and have made PrE9 and 10 work with AVDHD footage.  Of course, PrE11 is the best.  And yes, it really does, accept unsized RAW photos to mix in with the already mixed video footage from the three cameras. 

     

    As I say, my area of knowledge is narrow, but where I can help others, it's fun.  In fact, the most fun is helping the people in far away places that I hope to visit and film!

     

    Bill S

     
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