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gcannice
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What is the correct project setting for a high definition slideshow?

Mar 28, 2013 10:07 AM

I'm using Premiere Elements 11 and when I drag my jpeg photos on the timeline, I see the orange line across them; when rendered, the photos are cropped.  The last time I successfully created slideshows was in PE 8 and I never had this problem!

 
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 28, 2013 10:27 AM   in reply to gcannice

    For high-def, select any of the 1920x1080 project settings.

     

    Make sure your photos are no larger than 2000x1500. And make sure the program's preferences are set to Scale to Frame Size before you import the photos into your project, if you want the photos sized to fit in the frame.

     

    Although, since photos are 4:3 and high-def video is 16:9, they won't fill your video frame width-wise unless you pre-crop your photos.

     
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    Mar 28, 2013 11:07 AM   in reply to Steve Grisetti

    This is somewhat a design flaw.

    If one wants to pan and zoom over the stills they need to be twice the size of the frame.

    Then you don't want them set to scale to framesize as you will be scaling them up from 100% which means quality loss.

     
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    Mar 28, 2013 11:15 AM   in reply to Ann Bens

    To work with a Zoomed Out Still Image, where I wish to Pan beyond the size of the Frame, I just calculate how many pixels I will need for that Image, and Scale to those dimensions.

     

    If I have a great many such Images, I will even Crop (in Photoshop) to the height of the Frame, eliminating unused pixels - unless I also need to do a Tilt on one of those Images, but that is not very common. Most of my Tilts come when Zooming In, say to feature a person in a larger group.

     

    Hunt

     
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    Mar 28, 2013 12:01 PM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    Please do not judge the photogenic quality of the slides I picked for these two slide show examples.

     

    The project setting is AVCHD 1080p60.

     

    https://vimeo.com/60952115 This is a 22 second video where, as a self training exercise, I tried the resizing suggestions from Bill, Steve and Ann in other threads on this same subject.  I found no improvement, or degradation, to quality or processing performance -- regardless of how I resized or didn't resize.

     

    https://vimeo.com/60904593 This is a 20 second, 6 random slide, video to verify resizing was not needed.  All  the slides were brought directly from my HDD into PrE11 with the "Add Media" function.  They are about 20MB each, in a Sony RAW format and original un-resized files.  There were no issues in the process. 

     

    Although not demonstrated in these two videos, the Pan and Zoom feature in PrE11 works wonderfully on these un-resized photos.

     

    Vimeo allows you do download the actual .mp4 files I uploaded if you want to look closer as the product. 

     

    It has been mentioned in other posts that resizing may well have been necessary in earlier versions of PrE and may still be needed if you lack a strong computer.  Nowhere, that I can find, is it mentioned as necessary or suggested in Adobe authored instructions or tutorials. 

     

    Other than project presets or video driver issues I do not know why PrE11 slide shows work so well for me and cause problems for others.

     

    For Steve, Ann and Bill, can I provide screen shots of PrE11 settings or samples of anything via DropBox?

     

    Bill S

     
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    Mar 28, 2013 4:08 PM   in reply to gcannice

    I'll work on some screen shots.  But, I hate to suggest it, but our computers are in different worlds.  If you have anything going on in the background on a computer that was built in the Vista era, I think you are going to have trouble with PrE. Your computer may technically qualify as the minimum required, but it may struggle so hard, you won't get anything done.  Also, during the output process some big temporary files are created.  You need a lot of empty disk space which is also needed when Windows runs out RAM.  It borrows disk space and swaps back and forth with RAM to slowly try to get things done.

     
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    Mar 28, 2013 9:47 PM   in reply to gcannice

    It is made by ASUS and was marketed to "Gamers", but has the right specs for video editin and was almost half the cost of a Mac or HP "workstation" with the same specs. 

     

    ASUS Republic of Gamers G75VW-DS72

    2.3GHz Intel Core i7-3610QM Quad-Core

    16GB of DDR3 RAM

    256GB SSD

    750GB 7200 RPM HDD

    nVIDIA GeForce GTX 670M Graphics (3GB)

    17.3" HD Anti-Glare Led-Backlit Display

    1920 x 1080 Native Resolution

    Blu-ray Player and Burner

    4 USB 3.0 Ports

    Card Reader

    Display (Monitor) Port, 15 Pin

    Mini Display Port, 20 Pin

    HDMI Port

    Headphone Jack

    802.11b/g/n Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 4.0

    Integrated Webcam, Microphone & Speakers

    Windows 7 Home Premium (64-bit)

     
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    Mar 29, 2013 8:53 AM   in reply to whsprague

    Bill,

     

    Since the last time that we spoke of laptops, I finally have started ADK on my new computer. As I type, they are building, and setting it up. Hope to have it by mid-April, at the latest. After MY setup, I hope to report whether it was worth the $'s.

     

    I chose ADK, over another Sager, which has served me VERY well for almost 5 years, because Sager had gotten more into heavy gaming, and a few of those hardware choices were hard to re-tune for video editing. My old one was far easier to tweak, without having to pay for SLI cards, that would have to basically be disabled, and having a dead nVidia card, that I paid good $ for, sitting disconnected.

     

    Will give a full report, when I have tweaked it. Once I do have it running smoothly, I will perform the PPBM Benchmark (for PrPro CS 6), and link to the performance. Unfortunately, that benchmark will be only for PrPro (not PrE), and will include tests for CUDA/MPE, that PrE does not use yet. Still, it will be interesting to see how it compares to similar laptops, that appear on the PPBM spreadsheet.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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    Mar 29, 2013 9:27 AM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    Bill Hunt wrote:

     

    ......, I will perform the PPBM Benchmark (for PrPro CS 6), and link to the performance.

     

    Hunt

    Is that a test I can run without having PrPro?  It would be interesting. 

     

    I'm not sure if my nVidia card does anything with Elements and I'm not sure it would with Pro either as I have not seen it on any "supported" lists.  Also, when I've checked PrE seems to only use about half the memory when the i7 is working at full speed.

     

    Regardless, buying this laptop is the best thing I've done to make learning editing a pleasurable experience.  (The one possible exception is Steve's lynda.com course that helped and continues to help me find the buttons on the this laptop!)

     

    Bill S

     
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    Mar 29, 2013 9:31 AM   in reply to whsprague

    Bill,

     

    Unfortunately, it is only with PrPro. The benchmark test relies on that program, and runs specific Assets through the same functions. See their Web site for more info: http://ppbm5.com/

     

    Bill G., and Harm M., are working to update things for PrPro CS 6, with more in-depth testing, and even more, and faster data gathering.

     

    The PPBM can be used to test configurations, and as a real-world data source, to see where others have gotten improvement in their configurations.

     

    Being able to compare similar computers, but with slightly different hardware, or configurations, can be very useful, when deciding if a new vid-card, or a different I/O set up will likely improve performance.

     

    Some users are just trying to eliminate bottlenecks in their system, while some act more like "street racers," and upgrade equipment, to get the lowest possible processing times - a real competition. Like an F1 team, that requires deep pockets!

     

    Hunt

     
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    Mar 29, 2013 9:44 AM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    My primary curiosity is what you find out about performance as it relates to spreading the work among drives.  As I wrote before, I tried various things, including using a USB 3.0 external HDD as a "third drive".  Nothing worked better than stuffing everything in a single folder on the SSD. 

     

    My secondary curiosity relates to the process of re-sizing stills.  I followed everything you suggested and find none of it necessary!  Your workflow only adds work and extra time to a project!

     

    With an F1 budget it would be fun to build a computer with a bank of SSDs and try it all out. 

     

    As I've said before, my big test was a family documentary that plays for 75 minutes on a Blu-Ray.  PrE11 and the laptop rendered and wrote the Blu-Ray disk in under an hour!  For my purposes, that is wonderful!  There were two video tracks, pan and zooms on track 2 and a fair amount of "adjustement".  

     

    Bill S

     
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    Mar 29, 2013 9:53 AM   in reply to whsprague

    With an F1 budget it would be fun to build a computer with a bank of SSDs and try it all out.

    If you look at the I/O section in the spreadsheets, you will see that some folk are running some major SSD RAIDs, and you can see how those benefit the user. Also, as some have done separate benchmarks, as they change equipment, one can chart where improvements came. Harm Millard is a good candidate for that comparison, as he has altered his computer many times, posting benchmark results for most major changes. You can see what changes yielded the most BftB (Bang for the Buck).

     

    As it has taken the development team much time to adapt the testing for each new version of PrPro, I highly doubt that they will ever write it for PrE. Also, as new programming languages become available, they have also adapted to get more and quicker data-gathering, and processing to the spreadsheet. They have been working tirelessly on CS 6, and changes to their Web site.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 4, 2013 6:13 PM   in reply to gcannice

    For SlideShows, you will find a lot of recs. on this forum (though it's hosted by Adobe Software) for ProShow Producer, or their "step-down" Gold.

     

    I have flirted with Producer for some years, but kept finding that I could do everything that my clients needed, in PrPro (my main NLE), so never quite got to the point of buying, but I realize its potential. Now that I am retired, I do not have all those clients at the door, but might pick it up, just for me, as SlideShows are a big part of what I do for personal Projects.

     

    Good luck, and I think that you will find Producer to be very easy and powerful.

     

    Hunt

     
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