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Change shape without losing original effect

Apr 11, 2013 1:41 AM

High again

I have created a test roof for use (not right colour scheme) I have created as a two dimensional object.

foof_green.png

I have created a house in perspective and need to create the shape below with the one above:

roof_perspective.png

I don't want to distort my roof. There are lots of layers and paths as you can imaging creating a tiled roof.

 

Can anyone tell me how to get this without distorting my roof?

 

bookie56

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 11, 2013 4:27 AM   in reply to bookie56

    I don't understand what you want to do.

     
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    Apr 11, 2013 4:46 AM   in reply to bookie56

    Make a clipping mask.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 11, 2013 5:08 AM   in reply to bookie56

    bookie,

     

    If you mean to change into perspective without a mess, and presuming you have the whole roof within the bounds (no funny things outside, if there are anyyou will have to get rid of them first), what happens if you select the roof and the shape (which has to be above the roof in the stacking order) and Object>Envelope Distort>Make with Top Object?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 11, 2013 5:40 AM   in reply to bookie56

    See if the settings in the Envelope Distort options may help to get better results.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 11, 2013 5:44 AM   in reply to bookie56

    I don't want to distort my roof. There are lots of layers and paths as you can imaging creating a tiled roof.

    It's a 2D perspective drawing. So of course you are going to have to distort it. 2D drawing IS a process of distorting shapes so that they look dimensional.

     

    You should have drawn the roof outline shape first, and then constructed the tiles to fit its perspective. You could skew the pattern so that the semi-circular ends become more elliptical, then distort the overall pattern with a one-column, one-row Mesh Envelope, but the result will not likely be as convincing as if you had drawn it in perspective. For example, in the perspective view, more of one side of the cylinders would be visible and less of the other. That's not going to happen by merely envelope-distorting what you've already drawn.

     

    There are lots of layers and paths as you can imaging creating a tiled roof.

    But it's still a simple pattern of a small handful of repeating elements. There are several ways to semi-automate such a step/repeat, even in a perspective view. With a little forethought, the tiles on that roof could be drawn into the perspective in a few minutes.

     

    JET

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 11, 2013 5:50 AM   in reply to bookie56

    This is not what you want, bookie.

     

     

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 11, 2013 3:49 PM   in reply to bookie56

    bookie,

     

    If you wish to keep the tiles in parallel projection, the surface they are applied to (and the rest of the house) should also be (like in post #9), to avoid the (more) obvious incompatibilities (in post #11 seen at the left and top edges).

     
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    Apr 12, 2013 3:34 AM   in reply to bookie56

    bookie,

     

    Sorry, not following? OK! Like I said I am learning. If you have a better way please give me more of an idea...

     

    In parallel projection, such as isometric, lines that are parallel in reality are also parallel in the drawing. You can see that in the image in post #9.

     

    Your roof is a (more or less correct) parallel projection.

     

    In contrast, in perspective projection, (some) lines that are parallel in reality are converging in the drawing, as in the perspective grid.

     

    Those two kinds of projection do not match/mix well.

     

    You may get a convincing/reasonable/tolerable result if you create the roof as a parallelogram (opposite sides parallel) and then use Envelope Distort to distort the roof parallellogram into the quadrilateral shape/path that fits into the perspective grid.

     

    That was what I suggested in post #5:

     

    ... what happens if you select the roof and the shape (which has to be above the roof in the stacking order) and Object>Envelope Distort>Make with Top Object?

     

    And that would solve the issue of the funny cut offs (or should I say cuts off?) at the left and top edges.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 12, 2013 9:29 AM   in reply to bookie56

    For my part you are welcome, bookie.

     

    The quadrilateral shape/path you showed in the second image of the OP (Original Post) led me to believe that you needed to fit the roof into that specific shape.

     

    If that is the case, it may be simpler/more accurate to just use Envelope Distort with the shape that you already have, rather than dragging corners round to (try to) fit.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 12, 2013 10:16 AM   in reply to bookie56

    Have you already read post 7 ?

     

    (Apart from the fact that I wouldn't go the route you took here at all.)

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 12, 2013 11:59 AM   in reply to bookie56

    I hope you don't get that wrong, but: It seems you're a bit hasty sometimes.

     

    What have you discovered about the Envelope Distort options so far?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 13, 2013 12:04 PM   in reply to bookie56

    bookie,

     

    I have been away until now today (it is about 9 PM over here now).

     

    I am glad that you got it to work.

     

    Sometimes, it is quite difficult to know what goes wrong somewhere in the process, and seemingly innocent/insignificant things may have a great significance.

     

    The discrepancy apparent in the images in post #22 could correspond to a Clipping Mask hiding the outer halves of the two outer rows (there is no selection of the top image(s) which would reveal it).

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 13, 2013 1:23 PM   in reply to bookie56

    So, at the risk of being taken the wrong way - I will ask again.

    What would you have done? I can't be the first person to work with perspective and a tiled roof...

     

    I would have done it similar to the way a slater would do it in the real world. I would have tried to avoid the use of (too) flashy gradient filled roof tiles.

     

    There are many things I would probably have done completely different, just depending on the actual requirements.

     
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    Apr 14, 2013 1:42 AM   in reply to bookie56

    You are welcome, bookie.

     

    Us.

     
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