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383238
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View EPS files with CS3

Apr 25, 2013 11:25 AM

I have Adobe Illustraotor CS3, I only need it to view artwork files sent to me, I do not need to work on them, how can I view EPS files that were created in newer versions of Adobe

 
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 25, 2013 11:49 AM   in reply to 383238

    What OS? On a Mac you can use Preview.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 25, 2013 11:54 AM   in reply to 383238

    How about using Acrobat to open the files? It will require a full version.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 25, 2013 2:47 PM   in reply to 383238

    EPS is an ancient file format. No problem to view it even in older versions. Just create a new Illustrator file and place the EPS.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 25, 2013 3:17 PM   in reply to 383238

    Use File>Place or just drag it into the new file.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 25, 2013 4:14 PM   in reply to 383238

    > When I open the file then click file place it says I can't link a file that is already open.

     

    So you *can* open the file? You said you couldn't. I'm assuming you *can* but Illustrator issues a warning in the general ilk of "Error parsing EPS", and refuses to *show* anything.

     

    > But then if I just lauch Adobe and the "place" button is not available unless I open the file.

     

    "Place" is Adobe's lingo for what other software simply calls "Import". You cannot "place" something when you don't have a document to place it *in*. So start with a blank document -- "File" > "New". Don't bother about dimensions and color modes and such if you only want to see what's inside the EPS. *Then* select "Place".

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 25, 2013 4:31 PM   in reply to 383238

    If all you need to do is view it, try saying yes.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 25, 2013 11:46 PM   in reply to 383238

    Don't open the file. You can't.

     

    Create a new file as I already told you. Creating a new file works the same in about any software on the planet. Just press ctrl + n or cmd + n on a Mac and then hit OK.

     

    Then you will be able to place a file. Use File > Place from the menu.

     

    And maybe you want to read the manual as well. Find it here http://helpx.adobe.com/illustrator/archive.html

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 27, 2013 6:38 AM   in reply to 383238

    "Place" is Adobe's lingo for what other software simply calls "Import".

    Not exactly.

     

    It would be interesting to read Adobe's official criteria (if it exists) for whether a particular format belongs in "Open" or "Place." But generically:

     

    "Import" is more restrictive, in that it implies that an import filter is going to translate the incoming data into native objects. "Place" is a (rather awkward) throwback term to early page-layout programs (ex.: PageMaker), which were essentially intended to be "assembly" programs in which to assemble and arrange many multiple kinds of external files (text, raster, vector) into a page design. The implication of "Place" is that the receiving program does not necessarily have to "disassemble" or "break into" or even "understand" the content of the incoming file; it can just position and scale a reference to it on the page (i.e.; link).

     

    The "Place" concept is particularly germane to positioning EPS files in page-layout apps. The operative word in EPS is "Encapsulated." It provides for a "capsule" that can contain a collection of objects that can be passed to/through many programs that don't necessarily understand its content.

     

    (Remember, prior to its acquisition of Aldus, Adobe didn't even have a page-layout application.)

     

    So "Import" is what Illustrator does (if it can) if you don't specify linking to the external file. You don't have to Open an EPS in Illustrator; you can link to it as an external file (i.e.; "Place" it on the page.)

     

    To my mind, "Open" should be reserved for native files that were created in the program, "Import" should be reserved for non-native files that will be translated into native content, and "Place" (or "Insert") should be used for linking to external files. So Illustrator should not "Open" an EPS, since it may not have been created in Illustrator, and therefore may contain objects which will be translated with varying degrees of  fidelity; it should either "Import" it (translate it) or "Place" it (leave its content alone). By the same token, Illustrator should not claim to "Open" a JPEG, either.

     

    But remember, Illustrator was essentially a visual PostScript editor.

     

    Also it no doubt would arguably be more confusing to newcomers to provide an Open, Import, and Place command. (So why not make the terms more explicit and intuitive in the first place, perhaps like: Reopen, Translate, Link?)

     

    And it's also no doubt considered more "impressive" from a marketing standpoint to claim that a program can "Open" various other-brand native files, and that's where my cynical mind suspects the runaway overlap stems from. So Illustrator can ostensibly "Open" certain version Corel Draw files, and vice-versa. (No, they can Import data from each other, to varying degrees of fidelity.) Adobe, of course, is not the only offender here. For example, FileMaker claims to "Open" Excel spreadsheets, too, when it really just imports the data.

     

    At any rate, despite frequent claims to the contrary, EPS is not obsolete in the world at large beyond Adobe apps; not until non-Adobe apps can insert (place) and/or import (translate) PDF as a spot graphic. Microsoft Word (Windows), for example, can't do that. So EPS is still needed there for those who understand its purpose and limitations. Similarly, some softwares which drive cutters / plotters import EPS files with vector content, too; but don't claim to "open" native Illustrator files.

     

    JET

     
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