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daviesgeek
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How do I edit different codecs in one sequence?

Apr 25, 2013 11:34 PM

Tags: #files #premiere_pro_cs6

I'm completly new to Premiere Pro (switching from Final Cut Pro 7). I have footage from a Canon DSLR and a Canon camcorder. I'm trying to edit the footage without doing much transcoding, but it seems like the footage from one of the cameras will have to be transcoded. What settings do I use to transcode the footage to?

 

Keep in mind, I'm completely new to Premiere Pro, so I'm pretty lost

 
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 26, 2013 3:18 AM   in reply to daviesgeek

    Start with a sequence that is set to the footage that is the most common in your project. Assume it is from your Canon camcorder. Right click on a clip in the project panel and select New Sequence from Clip. That gives you the correct sequence settings. Now import your DSLR material and just drop it on your timeline. PR takes care of the rest for you.

     

    I have done that with mixes of DV 25i, HDV 1080i/25, P2 1080i/29.97, P2 1080p/24, AVCHD 1080i/25, AVCHD 1080p/50, 422 MXF 1080i/25, R3D 4Kp/24 and R3D 4Ki/29.97 all in one timeline.

     
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    Apr 26, 2013 6:53 AM   in reply to daviesgeek

    I too am a recent FCP7 convert. It's initially a hard concept to grasp but Premiere plays each file in it's native codec, in real time, as you play the sequence. When setting up a new sequence, the only critical settings are image size and frame rate. Create your new sequence (as Harm indicated) by selecting a clip from the primary/dominant source, or alternatively create a sequence with the desired resolution and frame rate.

     

    I created most of my custom sequence presets by starting with the AVC-I 100 presets. Premiere doesn't alter the original clip(s) until you either export your sequence, or add an effect. When you add an effect (i.e. transition, color correction etc.) Premiere converts (again in real time) the video to a high quality 32 bit color space to display the modified frames. Again, Premiere doesn't actually transcode anything until you set up your export, and then you choose the codec you need for your output.

     
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    Apr 26, 2013 8:00 AM   in reply to daviesgeek

    >completely new to Premiere Pro

     

    The tutorial list in message #3 http://forums.adobe.com/message/2276578 may help

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 26, 2013 9:21 AM   in reply to daviesgeek

    daviesgeek wrote:

     

    I'm completly new to Premiere Pro (switching from Final Cut Pro 7). I have footage from a Canon DSLR and a Canon camcorder. I'm trying to edit the footage without doing much transcoding, but it seems like the footage from one of the cameras will have to be transcoded. What settings do I use to transcode the footage to?

    You don't. Don't transcode anything. Leave your footage in it's native format. When you need a clip, drag it to the timeline (set up as Mr. MIllaard explains in his post). PPro takes care of it for you, almost like magic. You don't have to do a thing. IMHO this is one of the best features about PPro. That, and non-destructive editing of course.

     
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