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bordthewake
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Problem playing videos, display driver.

Apr 26, 2013 7:46 AM

Tags: #windows #elements_10

When I open my program(Adobe Premiere Elements 10) and I choose a project, a message pops up saying "we have detected an incompatible display driver." How do I update my display driver? Why hasn't this message ever popped up before?

 
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 26, 2013 12:42 PM   in reply to bordthewake

    There is a close relationship between video editing software, video cards and video drivers.  Where your video card may work in light duty applications, it may not in the more heavy duty climate of video editing.

     

    Video drivers (software) are frequenly refreshed.  If you have a video card in a desktop, get a current driver from the video card maker.  If you have a laptop, it may work better to get a new driver from the laptop maker. 

     

    You will also need a current copy of Quicktime as Premier Elements uses that heavily.

     

    Good luck.

     

    Bill

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 26, 2013 12:54 PM   in reply to bordthewake

    bordthewake

     

    The first order of business is to assure that your video card driver is up to date. Please refer to your computer's Device Manager/Display Adapters. Identify your video card driver, double click it, and select the Driver Tab and explore Update Driver. You could also look online for any updates for that video card.

     

    Uninstalling and reinstalling the present video card driver (if up to date) might be tried, but after...

     

    If you video card driver is up to date, then try deleting the BadDrivers.txt file. In Windows 7 and 8 64 bit, it can be found via the route:

    Local Disk C

    Program Data

    Adobe

    Premiere Elements

    10.0

    and in the 10.0 Folder is the BadDrivers.txt file that you delete.

     

    Also Premiere Elements requirements include latest version of QuickTime being installed on the same computer as Premiere Elements as well as Premiere Elements being run from a User Account with Administrative Privileges. But typically the symptoms that you suggest fall under the category of video card driver.

     

    We will be watching for your progress.

     

    Thanks.

     

    ATR

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 26, 2013 8:02 PM   in reply to A.T. Romano

    ATR,

     

    Please refer to your computer's Device Manager/Display Adapters. Identify your video card driver, double click it, and select the Driver Tab and explore Update Driver. You could also look online for any updates for that video card.

    I disagree with the first part of this statement. I have yet to see an OS that found an outdated, obsolete video driver, as they are usually 6 to 9 mos. out of date, themselves, and almost always indicate that one has the latest video driver, when they do not.

     

    I agree with the second part, however, concerning going to the video card mfgr's. Web site, plugging in the video card/chip's model, and the OS, then checking if the available video driver is newer. If so, I suggest downloading and installing that.

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 26, 2013 8:37 PM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    Hunt

     

    Sorry, but I have to disagree with your disagreement on the first part of the statement that I made. I never narrow a troubleshooting potential to Never.

     

    In spite of your "have yet to see"and your vast experiences, I think that you may be taking an unduly narrowing opinion here on that point. What I write is based on personal road tested experiences.

     

    In fact, I have found the Device Manager approach a good starting point and have found going to the computer or video card mfg's site for updates often the cause of confusion due to part numbers which are wrong or outdated and two or more T/S people there who cannot agree on them.

     

    They and all of us do the best we can to resolve the issues by the book or by whatever works to achieve that end.

     

    We have yet to find out the results from the BadDrivers.txt deletion.

     

    ATR

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 27, 2013 8:25 AM   in reply to A.T. Romano

    Well, "never" might be a bit too strong, BUT if you look through the PrE, PrPro and PS (yes, Photoshop now relies very heavily on the video driver, as of about CS 5), you will see hundreds, if not thousands of posts that basically state: "Windows told me that I had the latest driver, but that was from 2010, and I now see that nVidia (or AMD) has 25 newer ones... " I suppose that there HAVE been times, when Windows has gotten it right, but I have not seen one. The same holds for most driver utilities - they are so out of date, as to be useless. Without doing a spreadsheet of all such posts, and counting the times that Windows "got it right," vs how many that it got it very wrong, I would say that the best one could hope for with Windows and judging the video driver to be about 1:1000, and maybe even less. I contend that Windows is almost completely useless at determining if the video (and audio) driver is the latest one.

     

    As nVidia and AMD/ATI release a new driver, almost monthly (AMD is really cutting back on their driver updates for some reason), the Web site is the best place to check, and by a significant margin. The mfgr's. Web site will be 100% correct, all of the time.

     

    As for just the deletion of the BadDrivers.TXT file, if one still has an obsolete video driver, the program SHOULD just regenerate that file. Now, if they HAVE updated the driver, deleted the BadDrivers.TXT file, it should NOT be regenerated, at least for an nVidia, or AMD/ATI chip/card.

     

    It is just like my tire inflation warnings on my autos. I can reset the warning message, but if I do not change the inflation of my tires, a new warning message is generated.

     

    Just my opinion,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 27, 2013 9:54 AM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    I have an nVidia card in my Laptop.  Somewhere I read that laptops can have trouble with drivers that are not "tested and approved" by the laptop maker.  Should I use nVidia for updated drivers or the laptop maker, ASUS?

     

    (Note:  I've had and used computers since well before Windows.  I've not needed to worry about video drivers until I took up this movie making hobbie!)

     

    Bill

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 27, 2013 11:16 AM   in reply to whsprague

    Bill,

     

    Much will depend on the computer mfgr. Some, like Dell, HP, Lenovo, and a few others, DO re-wrap the nVidia (or AMD/ATI) video drivers for their exact hardware and version of the OS. In those cases, the nVidia, or AMD/ATI driver, directly from the card/chip mfgr. will not install. With such computer mfgrs. one should go to their Web site, and hope that the mfgr. has issued an updated driver. Some companies are better than others in that respect.

     

    As an example, I had the top-of-the-line Toshiba laptop, with an nVidia chip. None of the nVidia driver updates would install, and Toshiba never issued an update - that was now 10 years ago, and no new drivers from Toshiba. Their Customer/Technical Support also refused to answer any inquiries, or give me any information via telephone. For 5 years (the life of that laptop), I went to a Web site, that provided a re-wrapping service for nVidia video drivers, that would "fool" the computer into thinking that it was from Toshiba. That was the last time that I even considered a Toshiba laptop.

     

    In general terms, that re-wrapping is not a bad thing, but only so long as the mfgr. is quick to re-wrap the new drivers. Dell and HP seem to be quite good in that respect. The limitation, and it does not directly apply to either Dell, or HP, is when nVidia, or AMD/ATI stop supporting a chip/card with a particular OS. If there are no new drivers, the computer mfgr. is not able to continue the updating.

     

    So, the short answer is, "it depends." If I had a Dell, HP, Lenovo, or similar, THEIR Web site would be my first stop.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 27, 2013 1:18 PM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    Thanks for the insight.  For now, the ASUS laptop seems to be working fine.  I did update the driver once from the ASUS website.

     

    Bill S

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 27, 2013 3:40 PM   in reply to whsprague

    Updates to computer innards has taken me down a bad path more than once.  But, I threw all caution to the wind for the sake of keeping PrE in premium health.  I decided I would try it.

     

    First I created a Windows "Restore Point".

     

    Then:

    1.  Opened the nVidia control panel on my computer.

    2.  Clicked on Updates on the Help menu and got a Microsoft C++ run time error.

    3.  Clicked on Technical Support on the Help menu.  A nVidia Website opened up.

    4.  Navigated to "Drivers"

    5.  Clicked on a button that said "Auto Detect Your GPU

    6.  It determined my GPU, stated my Driver version was 291.?? and the current version was 314.??. 

    7.  I pressed the download button.

    8.  An .exe showed up on my computer that was over 200 MB.

    9.  I ran the .exe and it took over.

     

    It took a minute, but now I have a current driver.  PrE still runs.  Odly, the "Update" choice on the nVidia control Help menu works. 

     

    Aparently, ASUS  does not block or "re-wrap" updates to nVidia drivers.

     
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