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Best workflow for DVD Authoring from HD (AVCHD) files?

Apr 29, 2013 9:46 PM

Tags: #avchd #to #encore #sd #dvd #cs6 #hd #workflow #premiere_pro_cs6 #dvd_authoring #hd_to_sd_dvd #bad_quality_dvd

Hello all, I am new to the forums and after searching through the forums, I still do not have a definite solution. 

 

I am using Premiere Pro CS6 to edit my AVCHD files filmed at 1920x1080, 24 Mbps, PF30 (in a 60i container).  My sequence is set to the same settings (AVCHD 1080p30).  The video length is 68 minutes long.

 

So my problem is that when I dynamic linked to Encore CS6 and made my dvd, the quality was horrible.  The image quality was blurry and soft while viewed on an HDTV.  I then tried exporting an MPEG2-DVD at NTSC Progressive Widescreen High Quality with Maximum Render Quality and Maximum Depth at VBR-2 Pass (Min: 6, Target: 7, Max: 8).  I then imported the .m2v and audio file into Encore and burned another DVD only to have the same horrible quality. 

 

What is the best way to downscale HD footage to an SD DVD without much quality loss?  Either I have a completely incorrect workflow for downscaling HD to an SD DVD or I'm too used to crispy HD footage. On another note, how are commercial DVDs so crisp and sharp?

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 30, 2013 3:46 AM   in reply to derekl123

    Quality loss is inevitable but the dvd should look pretty good when played with a dvd player with upscaler or BD-player.

    Your workflow is ok.

    If you want crisp images: make a BD.

     
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    Apr 30, 2013 5:18 AM   in reply to derekl123

    As Ann Bens stated, quality loss is inevitable with software downsizing. The commercial DVDs look sharp and crisp because they have been downsized using extremely expensive hardware downsizers that cost well into the hundreds of thousands of dollars, if not millions of dollars, apiece.

     

    In addition, are you using a CUDA-enabled GPU (either one that's officially listed as "supported" on the Adobe site, or one that's enabled via the cuda_supported_cards.txt file has been modified) in your system? If so, then dynamic linking to Encore will defeat GPU acceleration completely, forcing all downsizing to use software only (Encore does not use GPU acceleration at all when downsizing, and thus will use Encore's default settings, with Maximum Render Quality disabled by default, unless that is changed). If no (this means that you are using an AMD Radeon card or the CPU's or motherboard's integrated graphics), or if you have not applied the CUDA "hack" with a card that's not officially listed on the Adobe site for GPU acceleration, then everything is software only with CS6.

     
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    Apr 30, 2013 7:18 AM   in reply to derekl123

    Hi Derek,

     

    You said your video is in a 1080i container, so in that case, I think you should be using the 1080i Sequence setting and not 1080p.

     

    Thanks

     

    Jeff Pulera

    Safe Harbor Computers

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 30, 2013 7:41 AM   in reply to derekl123

    >(in a 60i container).  My sequence is set to the same settings (AVCHD 1080p30)

     

    As Jeff says, you should use a correct sequence setting...

    See 2nd post for picture of NEW ITEM process http://forums.adobe.com/message/3776153

    -and a FAQ on sequence setting http://forums.adobe.com/message/3804341

     

    I go from AVCHD to DVD with results that are MUCH better than when I had a totally SD workflow

    http://forums.adobe.com/thread/652694

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 30, 2013 8:29 AM   in reply to derekl123

    derekl123 wrote:

     

    I am using Premiere Pro CS6 to edit my AVCHD files filmed at 1920x1080, 24 Mbps, PF30 (in a 60i container).  My sequence is set to the same settings (AVCHD 1080p30).  The video length is 68 minutes long.

     

    So my problem is that when I dynamic linked to Encore CS6 and made my dvd, the quality was horrible.  The image quality was blurry and soft while viewed on an HDTV.  I then tried exporting an MPEG2-DVD at NTSC Progressive Widescreen High Quality with Maximum Render Quality and Maximum Depth at VBR-2 Pass (Min: 6, Target: 7, Max: 8).  I then imported the .m2v and audio file into Encore and burned another DVD only to have the same horrible quality. 

     

    This is normal. A DVD is showing you around 1/6 of the pixels from your 1920 x 1080 capture. So of course it's going to be soft and blurry. This can be mitigated somewhat by using an upscaling blu-ray player to play your DVD. But it's never going to look as sharp and clear as a blu-ray disc. If you need that level of image quality, you have to burn a blu-ray disc. No other way to get it.

     

    derekl123 wrote:

     

    What is the best way to downscale HD footage to an SD DVD without much quality loss?  Either I have a completely incorrect workflow for downscaling HD to an SD DVD or I'm too used to crispy HD footage. On another note, how are commercial DVDs so crisp and sharp?

    Your downscaling workflow is very close to what I normally use, and it works very well for me. As long as I don't compare the resulting DVD to a blu-ray disc. Commercial DVDs aren't so crisp and sharp when compared to blu-ray output either. They are probably a bit sharper than yours, but then they use better software and more experienced people to do the compression -- sometimes optimizing the compression on a frame-by-frame basis. Which you can do when you throw enough money at the problem. If you need this level of quality for a DVD, you can get it -- just hire a decent post production house to do the work. If you've got the money, they've got the time, skills, and facilities. But really, the Adobe software can get you 90% of the way there.

     

    A lot of what I see in a commercial DVD of a Hollywoood movie that makes their DVD look better then mine is better lighting, better sets, better set decoration and art direction, highly trained talent, better cameras, better camera operators, better DP / cinematography, better sound, better effects (visual and sound), better music, better color coorection, better color grading, etc. An entire Hollywood production takes thousands of people, and I'm just one guy. That commercial DVD had damn well better beat mine!

     
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    Apr 30, 2013 8:46 AM   in reply to SAFEHARBOR11

    SAFEHARBOR11 wrote:

     

    Hi Derek,

     

    You said your video is in a 1080i container, so in that case, I think you should be using the 1080i Sequence setting and not 1080p.

     

    Thanks

     

    Jeff Pulera

    Safe Harbor Computers

    Settings are correct: 1080p.

     

    Derek needs to check if Premiere actually interpretes the footage as progressive.

     

    For more info: http://provideocoalition.com/index.php/atepper/story/psf8217s_missing_ workflow_em_part_1_benign_psf_versus_malignant_psf/

     
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