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Resize stills

May 6, 2013 11:11 AM

I am importing high resolution stills (jpg) [ 4000x 3000] into Premier 11. I have read that Pre creates much better results if I resize the still first in Elements to 1000 x 750  Is this true?Powerpc

 
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 6, 2013 11:20 AM   in reply to powerpcaa

    Some previous discussions

    Photo Scaling for Video http://forums.adobe.com/thread/450798

    -PrEl Crash http://forums.adobe.com/thread/973935

     
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    May 6, 2013 12:05 PM   in reply to powerpcaa

    powerpcaa

     

    If you are heading for a HD project, then the classical recommendation here and elsewhere is typically not to exceed about 2200 x 1238 pixels 16:9 (landscape orientation)

     

    If you are heading for a SD project, then the not to exceed values is typically given as 1000 x 750 pixels (landscape orientation).

     

    Behind all this is the idea that those values are close enough to project settings such as 1920 x 1080 or 720 x 480 (720 x 576) and yet leave room for some pan & zoom effects.

     

    The basis for this involves more than just quality issues. Often photos (and lots of them) oversized for the project create program failures at the level of both editing and exporting. Depending on the level of system resources, the problems can set in sooner than later. Some may avoid the failures altogether depending on their computer environment and other undefined factors but it is risky business using photos sized in excess of the recommendations.

     

    Lots written on this including considerations for cropping vs resizing when going from 4:3 to 16:9 or vice versa. What photo editor do you have or how were you planning on resizing your photos?

     

    ATR

     
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    May 6, 2013 2:29 PM   in reply to A.T. Romano

    I disagree.  Perhaps resizing was necessary with previous versions, but my experience is that resizing only adds unnecessary work in the current version 11.

     

    Admitedly, I didn't know what I was doing at the time when I first upgraded to PrE11, but I put 50 or 60 unsized .jpgs on Video Track 2 on top of a long series of 5 to 15 second clips on Video 1 for a family reunion documentary.  The result is 75 minutes long.  It worked great.  Many of the photos have some Pan and Zoom.

     

    When I bought a new Sony camera and upgraded the ACR the Adobe downloader reported it put ACR 7.3 in BOTH Photoshop Elements and Premier Elements.  I found that PrE accepts full sized RAW photos with no stress.  The two times I've participated in a resizing discussion here I posted examples of results on Vimeo.  So far they have had 3 views!

     

    My most recent project, shot at the Grand Canyon, is a mix of 1080p60 clips and HDR photos that were not resized at all.  The HDR photos came from sets of RAW photos processed by Nik HDR Effects Pro 2 into large TIFFs.  Since PrE does not like TIFFs, I exported the TIFFs into DNG files with Lightroom.  The tyical file is 75 mb and image size is 5429x3468.  They all have a little Pan and Zoom.

     

    You can watch the unresized, photos with Pan and Zoom effects here:  https://vimeo.com/64474485

     

    Bill

     
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    May 6, 2013 2:34 PM   in reply to powerpcaa

    powerpcaa wrote:

     

    I am importing high resolution stills (jpg) [ 4000x 3000] into Premier 11. I have read that Pre creates much better results if I resize the still first in Elements to 1000 x 750  Is this true?Powerpc

    It is not true.  Directly from the online manual:

     

    "Guidelines to add image files

    By default, Premiere Elements scales images to fit the project frame size. You can override this behavior and instead add your files at the size at which they were created. You can also set the default duration for all images that you add by changing the value in General Preferences.  You can add still images with frame sizes up to 4096 x 4096 pixels. Create files with frame size equal to or more than the frame size of your video.  Choosing the appropriate frame size ensures that you don’t enlarge the image in Premiere Elements. When you scale up an image, it often becomes pixelated. Create it at a larger frame size than the project. For example, if you plan to scale an image 200%, create the image at double the project frame size before you add it."

     
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    May 6, 2013 2:54 PM   in reply to whsprague

    Bill,

     

    I think that we have been done this road before.

     

    Your work is magnificient. I have watched your video in a prior thread. A true work of art. I have told you so in that prior post.

     

    However, based on personal and observed experiences of another, I am forced to disagree with your suggested generalization  about details of "proper" photo sizing for these Premiere Elements (any version) projects. I believe it to be a dangerous generalization that one does not want to go down to.

     

    If it works for you fine. Go with it. But, if you ignore the classical recommendations on this and it does not work, you are up against the frustration of a failed project with a lot of work lost....often the case, in the editing process, project will not open, burn to fails, and the like. Computer environments vary and how much sooner or later a user will come head on with this is variable. But with a lot of 4000 x 3000 photos in a project, that suggests a sooner than later scenario negative outcome.

     

    I did not write the book on this. I have not written any books. For one, Steve Grisetti does.I write what works for me or from what I have read and try to make the distinction between the two. I am just a Photoshop Elements Premiere Elements long time user and explorer. You already have acknowledged in a prior thread that you are aware of the posts of Steve Grisetti, Bill Hunt, and others on this point about photos oversized for a project and the expected negative consequences.  It is classical. Premiere Elements 11 is not the exception as far as I have ever run into, except in the work that you are reporting and displaying magnificiently.

     

    It will be interesting to follow the future reports on this.

     

    Thanks for listening.

     

    ATR

     

    .

     
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    May 6, 2013 2:59 PM   in reply to A.T. Romano

    A.T. Romano wrote:

     

    Bill,

     

    I think that we have been done this road before.

     

    Your work is magnificient. I have watched your video in a prior thread. A true work of art. I have told you so in that prior post.

     

     

    You are right.  I apologize for the momentary brain lag.  Most important, thank you again for the compliment.

     

    Bill

     
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    May 6, 2013 4:31 PM   in reply to powerpcaa

    powerpccaa

     

    Not yet. Consider.

     

    From what you wrote it looks like your original pixel dimensions are 4000 x 3000 pixels (4:3). If you are heading for a HD 16:9 project, best crop and resize. Photoshop Elements Process Multiple Files only batch resizes. It does not do batch cropping. A free program such as IrfanView has been mentioned as a candidate for the batch cropping resizing. I have also seen Microsoft Office Picture Manager mentioned for the job. There will also be scaling opportunites once you are in the project.

     

    When starting down this road, do the mini test runs before the grand project.

     

    Back in 2012 at a forum that I no longer visit nor answer questions,  user with ID Triggerman and I went through all aspects of a Blu-ray slideshow prep using Premiere Elements 11, lots of twists and turns.

    http://www.elementsvillage.com/forums/showthread.php?t=74072

    You might want to go through the details. The thread is lengthy but very worthwhile. It covers photo sizing as well as many other important consideration in the preparation of such a presentation. And, it had a happy ending.

     

    If you need clarification on anything that I have written in that thread, please ask me here in your thread.

     

    Thanks for the opportunity to help.

     

    Do not forget the experimention and exploration mini scale first.

     

    ATR

     
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    May 6, 2013 4:54 PM   in reply to powerpcaa

     

    powerpcaa wrote:

     

    I am using Elements 11 as my editor. Also I am building an HD project, so it looks like you recommend 2200 x 1238. I  plan to use the "Process Multiple Files" and the following settings; Width 2200 constrain proportions, resolution 200 dpi and convert to JPEG MAX Quality. Do you agree?Powerpc

    I must have bad breath or something!  Can you at least try putting some of your photo files into PrE11 without any preprossessing steps?  Then output to a AVCHD file as see what it looks like?

     

    I've written it works for me and quoted the actual instruction manual.  I provided an example.   It might work for you too!

     

    Bill

     
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    May 6, 2013 5:14 PM   in reply to powerpcaa

    powerpcaa

     

    Just a quick question...did you ever confirm what your intended export is for your HD Timeline?

     

    Is this going to be export to a file saved to computer hard drive, burn to DVD-VIDEO Widescreen on DVD disc, or burn to Blu-ray disc format on a Blu-ray disc?

     

    Thanks.

     

    ATR

     
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    May 6, 2013 7:19 PM   in reply to powerpcaa

    powerpcaa

     

    Thanks for the information about DVD-VIDEO Widescreen on DVD as your goal.

     

    Lots to explore. If you do not have too many photos and your computer resources are strong, that may minimize pre-processing to the extent that you might get away with scaling the images in the Edit Mode Monitor. But, if many, then explore the batch processing opportunities for crop/resize.

     

    And, depending on how large this project is going to be, you might explore how many non pre-processed photos you can into the project before you find the program will not let you continue or accomplish your project goals. Define your own project limits.

     

    ATR

     
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