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Is CS6 a dead product?

May 12, 2013 10:18 PM

I read somewhere that CS6 (the nonCloud original) was not going to have any more bug fixes -- is this true?

 

I bought two CS6 suites when it first released, what was that one year ago?

 
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 12, 2013 10:34 PM   in reply to gator soup

    There will be the occasional bug fix - as much as there ever is! LOL! - plus security updates, but that's it. There will be no further development of the software's functionality, and to that extent, it is already obsolete, having been superceded by the Creative Cloud version.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 12, 2013 10:40 PM   in reply to gator soup

    Only if Adobe squeezes in one last bug fix before June 17, but that's highly doubtful.

     

    Ps CS6 came out in March of 2012, not sure about the phony "suite".

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 13, 2013 10:01 AM   in reply to gator soup

    There are two questions here. One is "Will there be more bug fixes" and the other is "Will there be any more versions of CS6."

     

    On future versions of CS6, Adobe has said there will be at least an OS update. The following is from an interview with Adobe VP of Creative Solutions Winston Hendrickson (the bold formatting is mine):

    What support can CS6 users expect?

     

    Barring something unforeseen from Apple and Microsoft, we plan to update Photoshop CS6 for the next Mac and Windows operating system releases. Once Camera Raw 8 is completed for Photoshop CC, we are going to release a version of it for CS6 that includes any new camera support but without any of the new CC tools and features.

     

    In addition, DNG Converter will remain a free option to convert new Raw file formats for use in older versions of Photoshop.

    I don't know if they have said anything about bug fixes, but it's reasonable to assume that if any fixes are deemed critical enough, they will probably be rolled into the planned future releases they have announced.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 13, 2013 10:03 AM   in reply to gator soup

    I think that pricing and how to deal with a "owner" copy will be issues that Adobe will be forced to address in the future.  CS6 will work fine for several years, but after about 6 it may not keep up with the then current computers.  From reading these posts, and my own experience, the comfortable upgrade cycle was every 2-3 versions, which was about 3-4 years.  As we all know Adobe put a stop to that last year, although now it is moot as there are no upgrades.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 13, 2013 11:46 AM   in reply to Curt Y

    I smell more law suits coming.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 13, 2013 11:54 AM   in reply to Conrad Chavez

    > we plan to update Photoshop CS6 for the next Mac and Windows operating system releases

     

    For Windows, that might not be very far away. As I understand it, MS will be releasing a Windows 8 'Blue' package in the next few months. It's possible this is what he meant by the next 'Windows operating system release".

     
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  • JJMack
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    May 13, 2013 4:33 PM   in reply to gator soup

    Now that there will not be a CS7. CS6 life will in all probable be longer then it would it would have been it is was on it death bed.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 13, 2013 5:34 PM   in reply to Conrad Chavez

    Conrad Chavez wrote:

     

    …The following is from an interview with Adobe VP of Creative Solutions Winston Hendrickson (the bold formatting is mine):

    What support can CS6 users expect?

     

    Barring something unforeseen from Apple and Microsoft, we plan to update Photoshop CS6 for the next Mac and Windows operating system releases

     

    Pretty vague, and intentionally so obviously.

     

    What exactly are "the next Mac and Windows OS releases"?  I know 10.9 has been rumored.

     

    Most importantly, what would the "update" include?

     

    Naturally, I don't expect anyone to have definitive answers, I'm just pointing out the vagueness of that statement.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 13, 2013 5:35 PM   in reply to Curt Y

    Curt Y wrote:

     

    From reading these posts, and my own experience, the comfortable upgrade cycle was every 2-3 versions, which was about 3-4 years.  As we all know Adobe put a stop to that last year, although now it is moot as there are no upgrades.

     

    I bet a significant number of these customers only upgraded to the horrendously buggy CS6 because they were led to believe that they must do so if they wanted to remain on the upgrade path to a perpetually-licensed CS7 and beyond.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 13, 2013 5:36 PM   in reply to gator soup

    gator soup wrote:

     

    …there are likely many thousands of loyal users like me who will be holding out buying any more Adobe products for years to come...

     

    I know I'll carry that sentiment to my grave.

     
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  • Trevor Dennis
    5,925 posts
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    May 13, 2013 5:44 PM   in reply to conroy

    conroy wrote:

     

     

    I bet a significant number of these customers only upgraded to the horrendously buggy CS6 because they were led to believe that they must do so if they wanted to remain on the upgrade path to a perpetually-licensed CS7 and beyond.

     

    Goodness.  That is a new argument for me, and an exceptionally good one.   Perhaps the strength of the backlash against the move to the CC is going to work for Adobe, because they'll be able to pick and chose which points to respond to.  Most of the arguments are based on false premise, and are easily countered by Adobe.  Conroy, I strongly suggest you email the above point to Scott Kelby, who is able to meet with, and talk to Adobe management through his Chairmanship of the NAPP.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 13, 2013 5:47 PM   in reply to station_two

    station_two wrote:

     

     

    What exactly are "the next Mac and Windows OS releases"?  I know 10.9 has been rumored.

     

    Most importantly, what would the "update" include?

     

    Naturally, I don't expect anyone to have definitive answers, I'm just pointing out the vagueness of that statement.

    Having been around the block I would take this statement to mean if the CURRNET OS systems become incomopatable they would include an update.  But think that is highly unlikely as we are probably looking at minimium of 8 years in future, and by then Adobe would say it is not worth the effort to upgrade CS6 as it is so far out of date.  Currently Windows XP will not run the CC version I believe, and how old is that?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 13, 2013 7:41 PM   in reply to Curt Y

    I would imagine that CS6 will be viable on Windows for 5-6yrs at least - I'm guessing less for Mac users! - but by then, who knows what might happen?

     

    Perhaps by then a competitor would have come along - Nik/Google?! - or maybe onOne would develope a plug-in for Elements, alongside "Perfect Layers," that would let it handle 16bit files?

     

    Things might just get interesting!

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    May 13, 2013 7:56 PM   in reply to pf22

    Adobe has committed to trying to make Photoshop CS6 compatible with at leat the next OS releases from the big two, barring unforeseen surprises.

     

    Hm, imagining that Adobe no longer feels Elements is competing internally with Photoshop proper, one might even imagine their even adding 16 bit layers to Elements' capabilities themselves in a future release.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 13, 2013 8:59 PM   in reply to pf22

    pf22 wrote:

     

    I would imagine that CS6 will be viable on Windows for 5-6yrs at least - I'm guessing less for Mac users! - but by then, who knows what might happen?

     

    Perhaps by then a competitor would have come along - Nik/Google?! - or maybe onOne would develop a plug-in for Elements, alongside "Perfect Layers," that would let it handle 16bit files?

     

    Things might just get interesting!

    Yes, things are already starting to heat up. Check out "The Adobe Creative Cloud: Love It or Leave It," web page over at onOne Software. The concerns of Adobe customers are being heard throughout the industry and competing companies are beginning to move on it.

     

    Ultimately, Adobe will also get moving and respond sincerely to its customer's concerns. They have a superior product in Photoshop, but they also know that any giant can fall in this industry if they lose enough of their loyal customer base. They may have an exclusive product in Photoshop now, but they don't have an exclusive over the technology upon which it is built.

     

    I value Photoshop as an essential tool in my business as a photographic artist. I want to see it remain competitive -- to continue addressing the ever-evolving needs of my profession as well as being offered at a realistic price. Adobe products cover a broad market, but their new CC model does not charge all sectors of that market equitably. They know that. Their customers know it. And the industry is beginning to respond accordingly.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 13, 2013 9:09 PM   in reply to *Photonic

    I agree. I think that Adobe will reconsider and find a better way.

     

    vince

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 14, 2013 5:56 AM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    Noel Carboni wrote:

     

    Adobe has committed to trying to make Photoshop CS6 compatible with at leat the next OS releases from the big two, barring unforeseen surprises.

     


     

      Microsoft is readying the 'Next release' of Windows for release in the next few months with 'Windows 8 Blue". Initial rumors are that this will cost you money to get (and not be a free "Service Pack").

     

      So, it seems unclear to me if Adobe meant what people are taking this as (something like "Windows 9") or not.

     

      It could be that the stated commitment for Windows is satisfied in a lot less time than many would hope for.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 14, 2013 6:36 AM   in reply to Greg Bohn

    Greg Bohn wrote:

      It could be that the stated commitment for Windows is satisfied in a lot less time than many would hope for.

     

    That's my interpretation, too, with regard to Mac OS X. The next release of OS X is this summer. The following release of OS X will be next summer. That makes Adobe's commitment to be for little more than one year. Even that's only a "plan" and is "barring something unforeseen from Apple and Microsoft".

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    May 14, 2013 9:33 AM   in reply to Greg Bohn

    Greg Bohn wrote:

     


    Microsoft is readying the 'Next release' of Windows for release in the next few months with 'Windows 8 Blue".

     

    Yes, this is what I imagined when I saw the Adobe statement.

     

    Microsoft has traditionally maintained significant compatibility between versions.  There are certainly many compatibility settings in Windows 8 already.  Honestly, from what I can see, Adobe has to do nothing at all to make older versions of Photoshop "compatible" with Windows 8.  There are some glitches reported by Windows 8 / Photoshop CS6 users, but mostly those are because display driver writers have fallen down on the job, not because of things Adobe's doing with Photoshop that need tweaking.

     

    That said, Microsoft themselves appear to be breaking with tradition lately.  Their direction with Windows 8 is certainly not to advance desktop operations, and it's not clear where they're going (I'm not sure THEY even know, beyond "we want to be like Apple and be a tablet company").

     

    On the one had, Microsoft is not improving the desktop environment - they're actually deprecating it, even going so far as to delete features.  Personally I don't believe they have much talent left on staff for working on the Win32 side of things.  That implies little change that would matter to working applications, which is true of Windows 8 as I mentioned.  I suspect this will apply to "Blue" as well.  So in essence, Photoshop CS6 will run on it, and Adobe will have to do very little if anything at all.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 14, 2013 10:17 AM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    Noel Carboni wrote:

     

     

    ...Microsoft themselves appear to be breaking with tradition lately.  Their direction with Windows 8 is certainly not to advance desktop operations, and it's not clear where they're going (I'm not sure THEY even know, beyond "we want to be like Apple and be a tablet company").

     

    On the one had, Microsoft is not improving the desktop environment - they're actually deprecating it, even going so far as to delete features.  Personally I don't believe they have much talent left on staff for working on the Win32 side of things.  That implies little change that would matter to working applications, which is true of Windows 8 as I mentioned.  I suspect this will apply to "Blue" as well.  So in essence, Photoshop CS6 will run on it, and Adobe will have to do very little if anything at all.

     

    -Noel

    As a Mac user I can confirm this is also the trend with the Mac OS. All R&D seems to be going into converting everyone over to the smart phone / tablet mind-set. As a result the last two Mac OS releases look dismal in appearance and are more cumbersome to use. In an attempt to kill the mouse, flick-panning introduced a lot of compatibility problems. GUI custom settings have disappeared. Sad.

     

    Just as with Adobe's new CC model, Microsoft and Apple are trying to force-feed consumers their "vision" of how we should be using our computers and software, hoping it will convince us to buy lots of new stuff. Apple is the most guilty for turning computing into more of a "fashion statement" than a creative tool.

     

    As Noel mentions, the good news is that most of the OS changes are now just quick and cheap GUI tweaks rather than core improvements. And since almost a third of Apple users have been refusing to upgrade their OS from Snow Leopard, Apple is being forced to maintain compatibility in new OS releases.

     

    My guess is that PS CS6 has at least two good years of life left on both OS platforms. Probably longer since many customers will now refuse to upgrade beyond CS6, as they have with Apple's ill-fated "new OS of the year" marketing. And third-party companies, like on-One Software, are already saying they will maintain compatibility of their products with PS CS6 for years to come.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 14, 2013 10:34 AM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    Noel Carboni wrote:

     

    ...

     

    That said, Microsoft themselves appear to be breaking with tradition lately.  Their direction with Windows 8 is certainly not to advance desktop operations, and it's not clear where they're going (I'm not sure THEY even know, beyond "we want to be like Apple and be a tablet company").

     

    On the one had, Microsoft is not improving the desktop environment - they're actually deprecating it, even going so far as to delete features. 

     

    ...

    Ohhh, don't get me started on Windows 8 .

     

      I think Windows 8 is an abomination for desktop use for any serious work- At least the 'Metro' interface part.

     

      I think that Windows 8 is just so wrong on so many levels- The highlights:

     

      *) Metro store lock-in. MS gets to decide what apps you can buy and how much of a cut they take on

          every 'app'.

     

      *) No real desktop start menu.

     

      *) Trying to force a low-res phone/touch UI on a Desktop environment with Keyboard and mouse.

     

           Each UI may have it's place, but the needs of Productive users on a desktop with a 24-inch monitor

           aren't the same as those of a phone user...

     

            Yes, now I can be as productive on my desktop system as I am on my cellphone...

     

      *) The desktop is 'deprecated' as you said. So, their idea is that you should be using Metro for

           all new apps.  So, you can have 1 to 1 1/4 applications visible at one time.

     

           You might as well call it "Microsoft Window"...

     

      *) Personally, I think the flat blocky Kindergarten style is a step backwards.

     

      *) What was so wrong with the way things were before to justify changing everything

           and forcing everyone to re-learn what they spent years becoming good at?

     

      Suffice it to say that I think Windows 8 is hideous (at least for me). I have two licenses I bought when it was cheap (hoping the MS would some day come to their senses), but I don't use them.

     

      I'm staying on Windows 7 until they pry it from my cold dead hands .

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 14, 2013 10:57 AM   in reply to Greg Bohn

    Greg's post accurately represents the reaction of just about every single serious desktop user I know when we're confronted with Windows 8 or either one of Apple's Lion/Mountain Lion operating systems.

     

    This reality to a substantial degree mitigates the frustration caused by Adobe's move to a subscription-only mode.  The need and desire to stay put as far as both the OS and Adobe applications are very powerful.

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    May 14, 2013 12:41 PM   in reply to Greg Bohn

    Yeah, though I have Windows 8 in virtual machines for testing purposes, even though I know a bunch of great tweaks (I've written a book on it), I have personally chosen as well to stay with the more functional Windows 7 on my main development workstation.  I use the free Windows 8 Enterprise evaluation version in my test VMs - I refuse to send Microsoft a dime for the travesty that is Windows 8.

     

    Near as I can tell, even if you ignore all the degradations, Windows 8 brought exactly one new thing to the party - which I had already found a solution for:  It includes HyperVisor, a virtualization system.  I have been using VMware Workstation for years, and have no complaints; it's a solid product.

     

    By the way, I'm beta testing software for a guy who's about to release a product to bring back Aero Glass for the Windows 8 desktop.  I imagine that will help ease the pain for a lot of folks, but Windows 8 is a definite flop.

     

    Station_two makes great points about the latest OSX renditions as well.

     

    My point in bringing the OSs up here is to outline how utterly unclear the future of serious computing is at this time.  I'd be concerned if I was a company like Adobe who really needs there to be ubiquitous well-supported desktop computers in order to run their huge product suites.  There's no way Photoshop can be useful on a tablet!

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 14, 2013 12:55 PM   in reply to pf22

    pf22 wrote:

    I would imagine that CS6 will be viable on Windows for 5-6yrs at least - I'm guessing less for Mac users! - but by then, who knows what might happen?

     

    Well, many of us consider that snow leopard was the last useful OS developed by apple and have refused to upgrade to lion or mountain lion, which are just loads of ios gimmicks.

    My CS6 and snow leopard will continue to serve me well for many years until either adobe get a clue or other companies offer replacement products for apps like Photoshop.

    Heck, we even still have Photoshop 7 and Win xp running on some of our machines where I work.

     
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  • JJMack
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    May 14, 2013 2:06 PM   in reply to Noel Carboni
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 14, 2013 2:13 PM   in reply to JJMack

    Giving away sour milk does not make it taste better.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 15, 2013 10:43 AM   in reply to gator soup

    There will be the occasional bug fix - as much as there ever is! LOL! - plus security updates, but that's it. There will be no further development of the software's functionality, and to that extent, it is already obsolete, having been superceded by the Creative Cloud version.

     

    Thanks to helpful. http://www.yazsana.net/

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    May 15, 2013 4:42 AM   in reply to JJMack

    JJMack wrote:

     

    Looks like Windows 8 blue will be free download http://rcpmag.com/articles/2013/05/14/windows-blue-officially-windows- 8-1.aspx

     

    Thanks for the link, JJ.

     

    It remains to be seen whether Microsoft has done anything that would make it worth having.  I did an actual Return on Investment analysis on Windows 8.  Just based on several features I use that have been removed, and how much longer it would take to accomplish my goals without those things, Microsoft would have to pay me hundreds of dollars a year for Windows 8 to bring any positive value.  Of course, in doing that investigation I wrote a whole book on how to tweak Windows 8 ("Configure the Windows 8 'To Work' Options"), which now brings in some money.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 15, 2013 6:53 AM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    > It remains to be seen whether Microsoft has done anything that would make it worth having

     

      I'm guessing the reason it's going to be free is that they decided they couldn't get away with charging for it...

     

    > Microsoft would have to pay me hundreds of dollars a year for Windows 8 to bring any positive value.

     

      My take was that it would be a continual/perpetual drag on productivity for the things I do.

     

      Hey, I know! I can bill them monthly...

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 15, 2013 7:56 AM   in reply to pf22

    Hi,

    pf22 wrote:

     

    Perhaps by then a competitor would have come along - Nik/Google?! - or maybe onOne would develop a plug-in for Elements, alongside "Perfect Layers," that would let it handle 16bit files?

     

    Supporting 16-bit images implies that the program is able to create memory structures and mechanisms that are adapted to this. IMHO, this functionality cannot be added by an external module (unless it completely replaces PSE ). This is a design problem. If 16-bit support ever appears in PSE, this will certainly come from Adobe, not from an external development team.

     
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  • JJMack
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    May 15, 2013 8:01 AM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    Yes I stayed with XP on my older machines till they died. Would not put vista on any machine.  Have Windows 7 Professional on my current machines and have no plains to use Windows 8 Professional.  Even my $300 Acre netbook came with Windows 7 Professional that the reason I grabbed it. I see no good reason for a tablet I do have an iPod for pocket use. I don't even have a cell phone. However we have a track phone just in case something bad happens. It has thousands of minuets that get carried over each year and never get used.

     

    Netbook and iPod cost the same. Netbook get more use still its nice to have the iPod with thousands of music tracks and a 3:2 display for my images.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 15, 2013 9:30 AM   in reply to Samoreen

    Samoreen wrote:

     

    Supporting 16-bit images implies that the program is able to create memory structures and mechanisms that are adapted to this. IMHO, this functionality cannot be added by an external module (unless it completely replaces PSE ). This is a design problem. If 16-bit support ever appears in PSE, this will certainly come from Adobe, not from an external development team.

     

    Damn, another small sliver of hope dashed!

     

    I'm not a programmer, just a user, but I'd heard that the PSE was effectively built on Photoshop code, although with a different front-end and a lot of the "higher functions," if you will, disabled.

     

    If - BIG if! - that were the case, and the 16-bit support was there in the basic code, I wonder if an external module would be able to unlock it? (Clutching at straws here I know! )

     

    But if what you say is correct, and you probably are, I highly doubt that Adobe would give people like me the option of never having to sign up to the Cloud!

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 15, 2013 9:35 AM   in reply to JJMack

    JJMack wrote: ... its nice to have the iPod with thousands of music tracks and a 3:2 display for my images.

    I used to use an iPod Touch the same way, but now I have the iPad 3 with it's Retina Display, and primarily use it as a "digital portfolio." As long as you size your images, from scratch, for the iPad display they look stunning!

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 15, 2013 10:12 AM   in reply to pf22

    pf22 wrote:

     

    If - BIG if! - that were the case, and the 16-bit support was there in the basic code, I wonder if an external module would be able to unlock it? (Clutching at straws here I know! )

     

    Your statement is almost correct. There are functions in PSE that are just hidden. The code is here but the user interface for these functions has been removed. A tool like Elements+ is able to unhide such functions by providing a script and a graphical interface to these features, which works fine. Elements+ adds many hidden functions to PSE but it does nothing about 16-bit support.

     

    PSE can read 16-bit files, but obviously it needs to convert them to 8-bit before applying most effects. This indicates that the internal data structure of PSE cannot handle 16-bit files directly. So it's not a matter of unhiding features but a matter of managing memory so that 16-bit files can be processed.

     

    PS and PSE plugins can only access functions that are exposed to external modules through what developers call an API (Application Programming Interface). This is the only way for external code to communicate with the PS/PSE internals. If this API was able to expose the 16-bit memory management mechanism, I guess that the problem would have been solved by a plugin developer since a long time. But plugin developers only see from the PS internals what Adobe allow them to see.

     
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