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How to 'hide' one stroked-only object behind another?

May 14, 2013 4:17 PM

I'm struggling with something that shouldn't be this difficult!

 

I'm laying-out a white-only T-Shirt logo (to go on a dark-green T-shirt)

 

For the sake of simplicity, let's say I have two ovals with no fill, just a white stroke.  A small oval overlapping (on-top-of) part of the edge of a larger (underneath) oval.    I

 

Any advice on how to 'hide' the line that's 'behind' the top object?

 

Thusly: http://i.imgur.com/ZghWTMa.jpg  

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 14, 2013 4:28 PM   in reply to boinkly

    Cut the path of the larger circle with the Scissors tool (KBSC-C) at the points where it crosses the smaller one and delete the cut piece.

     
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    May 14, 2013 4:50 PM   in reply to boinkly

    Bear in mind that 0% CMYK means no ink.

    Therefore draw your ellipses with 0% CMYK fill and 100% K stroke.

    Tell your printer that black in your drawing is to be printed with white ink.

     

    There’s no need to scissor anything or anything else so complicated.

    Think in separation plates, not colours.

     
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    May 14, 2013 4:55 PM   in reply to Steve Fairbairn

    But he's got no fill to mask the line, Steve. If he wants it to look like the posted image the only way is to cut the larger line.

     
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    May 14, 2013 5:00 PM   in reply to boinkly

    You've said what the design will be printed on, but you never actually said how it will be printed. Is this, in fact, going to be screen printed?

     

    JET

     
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    May 14, 2013 5:36 PM   in reply to boinkly

    For a visual aid.

    rings.jpg

     
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    May 15, 2013 2:34 AM   in reply to Larry G. Schneider

    But he's got no fill to mask the line

    But he should have.

    That’s why I told him to use white ellipses with black strokes.

    Just put one ellipse on top of the other and the white (no ink) fill will do all the necessary masking.

    The colour of the substrate is immaterial and so is the printing method (silk screen or transfer but not ink jet).

     

    The only things the printer needs are one separation film and some white printing ink.

     
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    May 15, 2013 2:36 AM   in reply to Mike in British Columbia

    Very pretty but you are missing the point.

     
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    May 15, 2013 6:27 AM   in reply to boinkly

    Actually, I'm not completely sure yet.

    Steve's answer assumes screen printing with a single opaque white ink. It won't work if printing to non-opaque composite transfers, or cutting from aplique vinyl, or if you're going to import the two-ellipse artwork for combination with other artwork.

     

    Since you don't know:

     

    1. Draw the two circles with a stroke color and a fill color (ex: black Stroke, white fill) on both.
    2. Apply the desired stroke weight.
    3. Object>Path>Outline Stroke.
    4. Pathfinder palette: Merge.
    5. White pointer: Select the two inside regions and delete.
    6. You now have a single Compound Path; no overlapping objects, and actual "holes" where you want the substrate to show through. Apply whatever fill color (white, etc.) you need.

     

    But bear in mind what has already been stated: White, unless defined as a Spot Color, does not "print." Think in terms of inks, not in terms of "color". In a program like Illustrator, "white" normally means "no ink." And you always have to know what printing method you are designing for.

     

    JET

     
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