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sloberdobhelp
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I would like the anchor points on the inside edge of my line

May 16, 2013 8:02 AM

How do I change the position of  anchor points on my line,  at the moment the anchor points are in the middle of my line, I would like the anchor points on the inside edge of my line so I can make my cut cuides more accurate. I am using illustrator CS6 cloud.

 

Message was edited and moved to Illustrator Forums by the Admin: Nitin Gupta aka LP

 
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    May 16, 2013 8:00 AM   in reply to sloberdobhelp
     
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    May 16, 2013 8:04 AM   in reply to sloberdobhelp

    You can't.

     

    That's simply not how paths and anchors work in Illustrator. Anchors are always dead center of the path. However, you can offset a stroke. The stroke is the visible attributes of a path. The path and anchors are merely construction elements.

     
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    May 16, 2013 9:01 AM   in reply to sloberdobhelp

    There are several ways to offset a stroke.

     

    You can use the stroke alignment options on the stroke panel if the path is closed.

    You can use Object > Path > Offset path

    You can use Effect > Path > Offset Path

    You can use the Width Tool

     
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    May 16, 2013 9:59 AM   in reply to sloberdobhelp

    Then that IS what you need. Have you tried any of them?

     

    Draw a box, add a 1pt stroke, click the Align Stroke to Outside button on the stoke panel.

     

    Draw a closed path, add a 1pt stroke, choose Object > Path > Offset path and enter 1pt in the Offset field.

     

    Draw an open path, switch to the Width Tool and Option/Alt click the stroke and move one side up to the  anchor:

    Snap_002.png

    You may want to then save this as a Width Profile so you can then simply select the profile on the Stroke panel in the future.

     
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    May 16, 2013 10:25 AM   in reply to [scott w]

    Scott,

     

    Draw a closed path, add a 1pt stroke, choose Object > Path > Offset path and enter 1pt in the Offset field.

     

    Would that not be 0.5pt (and the same for it as an effect)?

     
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    May 16, 2013 10:29 AM   in reply to Jacob Bugge

    oops.. yup 0.5pt since AI centers all strokes by default. Thanks Jacob.

     
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    May 16, 2013 2:18 PM   in reply to sloberdobhelp

    You mean like this? :

    Picture 1.png

    It’s called Align Stroke to Outside in the Stroke panel.

    As you might expect, it only works with closed paths.

     
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    May 17, 2013 4:14 AM   in reply to sloberdobhelp

    It is not a good idea to make cut guides in Indesign, is not the right tool for that.

     
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    May 17, 2013 4:26 AM   in reply to sloberdobhelp

    A cutter guide is vector based info mostly made in a CAD program (like ArtiosCad).

    So if you want to use this vector info in a exact way (like you mention in post) the program in the Adobe suit to use is Illustrator en not Indesign.

    Also all professional tools that are available in the packaging industry are vector based.

     
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    May 17, 2013 5:29 AM   in reply to CHMprepress

    Nonsense. Paths drawn in InDesign are every bit as "vector" as paths drawn in Illustrator.

     

    The problem in this thread is sloppy, ambiguous terminology. Slober is talking about "cut guides", by which he/she probably means the shoptalk term "cut line" or "holding line"—which are nothing more than strokes on the rectangles surrounding (or clipping paths containing) placed images.

     

    You are interpreting this as cutting paths as would be used to define the path that a NC machine (plotter, cutter) would follow to cut or mark on something—which could be created in either Illustrator or InDesign or just about anything—and which usually ultimately gets converted to HPGL anyway before being sent to the device.

     

    If Slober were talking about device cutting paths, offsetting the mere rendering of the stroke would not work; such devices follow the paths themselves, not their printed render. You'd have to actually offset the path itself, by using an offset path command or outlining the stroke, etc.

     

    JET

     
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    May 17, 2013 6:24 AM   in reply to sloberdobhelp

    Well, then that depends on what you mean by "die cutter."

     

    Die cuts for offset printing are still commonly jobbed out to a guy who actually uses a print of an outline as a guide while fabricating a die that is then mounted on a letterpress press. For that kind of die workflow, a mere offset stroke works, because a human is using a print as the guide.

     

    But if the die is being actually cut by a numerically-controlled device that follows a digital path with a cutting blade, then the path itself—not just its printed rendering—has to define the actual shape of the die path.

     

    JET

     
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