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Photoshop detected an error in your display driver.

May 28, 2013 6:57 AM

hello,

i have had this error for since over a couple of months and i have been udated my graphics card to the latest beta versions.

this is what my graphics procces settings showhttp://img838.imageshack.us/img838/1713/05c9aaae339f4426b9de450.png

- AMD radion hd 6000 series

-http://support.amd.com/us/gpudownload/windows/Pages/radeonaiw_vista64. aspx

 

it only crashes when i switch tools.

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 28, 2013 7:29 AM   in reply to LetsDemize

    Your screen shot shows "no gpu options available".  Therefore it is not recognized.  Run some checks in the OS to see what problem is.

     
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  • Noel Carboni
    23,524 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    May 28, 2013 8:46 AM   in reply to LetsDemize

    Since the Catalyst 13.4 release (not beta) seems perfectly stable with Photoshop, I suggest removing the beta driver version (with the assistance of the Catalyst Un-install Utility) and installing the 13.4 release.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 26, 2013 10:44 AM   in reply to LetsDemize

    There is a fix that worked for me, which I imagine is not recommended by Adobe.  I am using Photoshop CC with Windows 8.1 Pro. 

    1. First, to be safe, make sure your operating system is up to date, then go to your graphics card's manufacutrer's website (NOT Microsoft Update) to get and install the latest driver, and of course make sure Photoshop itself is up to date.  Reboot. 
    2. Next open Photoshop and see if uder Preferences>Performance the graphics card information is still grayed out (along with the 3D menu).  If so, exit Photoshop and proceed to the next step. 
    3. Search your Adobe program directories for files named sniffer*.*.  For each executable file (names vary by version and operating system), change it in an obvious, searchable way (I like to insert a ~ before the full name, so later I can find and reverse the procedure if necessary).
    4. Repeat step #2.  For me it immediately recognized my Nvidia GTX Titan card and the 3D menu was back in business. 

     

    Hope that helps!

     
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  • Noel Carboni
    23,524 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 26, 2013 2:20 PM   in reply to Pierster

    Thanks for the procedure, Pierster.

     

    Just keep in mind that changing files in the Photoshop installation area may result in a failure of the updater the next time a Photoshop update is available.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 3, 2014 6:26 PM   in reply to LetsDemize

    I am seeing this error notice on first launch of Photoshop CC on Mac OS X. I am running 10.9.1 on a machine which was not built by Apple, or in other words, a Hackintosh or CustoMac, which contains an NVidia GTX 670 and an AMD Radeon R9 270X. Both of my monitors are connected to the GTX 670. Some OpenCL processing is currently running on the R9 270X, which appears to the running application as AMD Radeon HD - FirePro D300 Compute Engine.

     

    The following is the output of the sniffer tool located inside the app bundle:

     

    snifferStart="2014-01-03_18:16:18"

    2014-01-03 18:16:18.237 sniffer[40830:507] invalid display

    Exception caught and ignored.

    2014-01-03 18:16:18.238 sniffer[40830:507] invalid display

    Exception caught and ignored.

    NumGPUs=0

    snifferEnd="2014-01-03_18:16:18"

     

    Both cards are verified to fully support 3D rendering as well as OpenCL computation. Of course, the Radeon card is much more efficient at number crunching, while the GeForce gains about 35% over the Radeon in heavy 3D performance, so unless Photoshop needs double precision shaders, it should probably be a faster choice for OpenGL processing.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 3, 2014 7:07 PM   in reply to kode54

    Well, the video drivers are returning errors - and since they fail on even basic queries, Photoshop cannot use the cards.  Disabling the sniffer may make them work... until they crash or give other errors.  The MacOS drivers just don't seem to be happy with your system or cards.

     

    Also, Apple and Windows drivers usually are not happy with mixed brands (and sometimes models) of video cards.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 3, 2014 7:17 PM   in reply to kode54

    Kode54,

     

    Think Chris was being kind.  Running 2 different cards with PS is a recipe for disaster.  Use the stronger of the two for both monitors.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 3, 2014 8:18 PM   in reply to Curt Y

    I already have both of my monitors connected to the GTX 670, which happens to be stronger at general OpenGL performance than the Radeon. In fact, I've already come to learn from experience that OS X does not really like having monitors distributed across multiple video cards, as it attempts to simultaneously render all windows on all cards with monitors attached, in an attempt at synchronization. This is already a mess with AMD video and Intel integrated, which is a required setup to get the Chameleon or Chimera boot loaders to even start up with an AMD Radeon 7xxx series card, as their VGA BIOS is too large for that boot loader. This is not a common Apple problem, but a problem for people who build their own machines from base components and use third party installers and boot loaders to make the whole thing run. I had a measure of success booting with just the AMD card using the Clover boot loader, but it gets stuck at gray screens on all my monitors with a spinning beach ball cursor. Again, not your problem.

     

    What I would like is for this sniffer tool to emit some more helpful error messages than just a general failure and a source code line number where it fails. Although, it's two numbers, so perhaps it is a line number and an error number? Or is it something else entirely?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 3, 2014 9:03 PM   in reply to kode54

    Not an expert here, but think it is more like a pass/fail test.  Both are hi end cards and either should work fine with corrrect drivers.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 3, 2014 9:18 PM   in reply to Curt Y

    True, but the R9 270X gets 26.5 fps in Heaven 4.0 at Extreme, while the GTX 670 gets 35 fps exactly. On the other hand, the R9 270X is about 3.5x as fast at crunching numbers compared to the GTX 670.

     

    I won't worry too much that it doesn't work with Photoshop, as I haven't found much of any use for Photoshop's OpenGL or OpenCL capability yet, what with being a totally casual user.

     
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