Skip navigation
Currently Being Moderated

Archiving: toss original raw, keep it as smart object in PSD ok?

Jun 15, 2013 11:36 AM

For archiving purposes, once a .NEF is embedded in a .psd file as a smart object,

I can toss the original .NEF, right?  Cuz the entire reference is contained within

the smart object as long as I keep the .psd, right?

Thanks

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 15, 2013 5:07 PM   in reply to Steve Zeeeee

    Steve, if your question goes to whether the Smart Object and the original raw file are linked, the answer is that they are NOT linked.  So deleting the original raw file will not affect the Smart Object in the least.

     

    The desirability of keeping the raw file for other purposes is an entirely different and subjective question.  It depends on independent factors like what the future may hold, whether you're contemplating abandoning Adobe as many of us are, etc.

     

    Storage space is very cheap these days.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 15, 2013 7:10 PM   in reply to Steve Zeeeee

    And for archiving, I would stay away from PSD (especially considering the recent subscription-only access move by Adobe) I would look at open standard formats like TIFF or  DNG.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 15, 2013 10:21 PM   in reply to charles badland

    Charles, I've got very bad news for you:  Adobe controls TIFF (has for a while) and of course the DNG format too, as it is their own creation to begin with, just as they control PSD and PSB.

     

    From the TIFF File Format entry in Wikipedia: 

     

    TIFF (originally standing for Tagged Image File Format) is a file format for storing images, popular among graphic artists, the publishing industry, and both amateur and professional photographers in general. As of 2009, it is under the control of Adobe Systems. Originally created by the company Aldus for use with desktop publishing, the TIFF format is widely supported by image-manipulation applications, by publishing and page layout applications, by scanning, faxing, word processing, optical character recognition and other applications. Adobe Systems, which acquired Aldus, now holds the copyright to the TIFF specification.

     

     

    Adobe has chosen to publish the specifications for PSD, to make it accessible to other developers.

     

    If they wanted to, they might conceivably pull the plug on TIFF and DNG, the same way you fear they can on PSD.  No difference there.

     

    TIFF and DNG are no more "open" formats any more than PSDs are, not more and not less, anyway.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 15, 2013 10:33 PM   in reply to charles badland

    Reflecting on the ramifications of the above helps us better understand the hubris and bravado Adobe has been showing in recent years…                                                          

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 16, 2013 5:21 PM   in reply to station_two

    No. I did know that. I had no idea Adobe owned TIFF. And I thought Adobe "gave away to the public" rights to DNG.

    I saw in Nack's blog Adobe had published the specs to PSD, but I don't know ramifications of that verses "open source" formats.

    Thanks for the info.

    I had always thought Adobe was truly concerned about "archival" nature of digital image encoding. That they were in it for the greater good of preserving art for future generations.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 16, 2013 11:28 PM   in reply to charles badland

    Yes, at one time Adobe was indeed a great company.

     

    Ever since the days of the former CEO (Bruce Chizen) and the Macromedia merger fiasco, the whole culture in the Adobe bureaucracy changed.

     

    It's not just customers who are disappointed, creative and engineering forces within Adobe are too,

     
    |
    Mark as:

More Like This

  • Retrieving data ...

Bookmarked By (0)

Answers + Points = Status

  • 10 points awarded for Correct Answers
  • 5 points awarded for Helpful Answers
  • 10,000+ points
  • 1,001-10,000 points
  • 501-1,000 points
  • 5-500 points