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Mike Fernbank
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How to print part of an InDesign CS6 page?

Jun 18, 2013 10:39 AM

I made the large leap from InDesign CS3 to CS6 and imagine my surprise when I saw that this version of ID still does not give you a way to print just part of a page. Am I just missing something? Since this is supposed to be a unified "suite" of applications, I assumed that simple thngs—like the print dialog—would have simlar features. Not so. In Illustrator you get a thumbnail image and you can drag the image around to print just a part of the page. The ID print diaglog is mostly unchanged from it's earliest version. The AI print dialog is very useful when trying to proof large format print jobs on a small format printer. In fact, it makes more sense for ID than Illustrator, but it is not there. I'm hoping that I'm simply missing something easy. Right now I have to export as a PDF and open in AI one page at a time. Very laborious. I have to say, for a "suite" this group of apps are more different than alike. Thanks in advance for any help.

MHBrown

CS6

OS 10.8

 
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    Jun 18, 2013 11:13 AM   in reply to Mike Fernbank

    You cannot compre a graphic application with a layout application. But what you can do is to export the file to pdf and in Acrobat or Reader use the snapshoot tool, drag a rectangle with it and then you can print the selection.

     
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    Jun 18, 2013 11:37 AM   in reply to Mike Fernbank

    You can also set up tiling. Manual tiling is a bit of a pain, but it can be done if you don't want to break the page into a grid.

     
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    Jun 18, 2013 11:43 AM   in reply to Mike Fernbank

    That is NOT true. Illustrator is a program without pages. It has no pages. It has artboards. But that is a complete different thing. Illustrator is supposed to have content put around on very different places. InDesign is a page orientated application. It follows complete different premisses. So here is a huge difference in the purpose of both programs.

     
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    Jun 18, 2013 11:45 AM   in reply to Mike Fernbank

    BTW I saw that you are opening pdf created in ID in Illustrator. You should not do so, because it will destroy fonts. And you will get a very different result than what you have done in InDesign.

    The ony pdfs which are to open in Illustrator are those created in Illustrator with Illustrator editing capabilities.

     
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    Jun 18, 2013 11:55 AM   in reply to Mike Fernbank

    You are missing the point: Due to the fact that the programs are completely different they cannot have the same printing dialog. That dialog is not part of the suite it is part of the program.

     
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    Jun 18, 2013 11:57 AM   in reply to Mike Fernbank

    Every application has a different type engine and processes type different. Illustrator and Photoshop are similliar, but a pdf from Photoshop has other issues when opened in Illustrator.

    But this is generally a basic that you should never open a pdf in Illustrator, Ai is a pdf cretor not a pdf parser.

     
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    Jun 18, 2013 12:07 PM   in reply to Mike Fernbank

    But you don't have a clue on the basics of each of these programs. No, one is graphic, the other is layout. If both had the same purpose one would be to much.

    No one will design brochures in Illustrator nor wll anyone create grphics or maps in InDesign. Bot are dedicated to different purposes.

    Illustrator has no pages, but InDesign prints pages. And if you need a selection to be printed do it in Acrobat.

     
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    Jun 18, 2013 12:09 PM   in reply to Mike Fernbank

    The theory of your point is not lost on me, Mike...BUT...your repeated arguement about the apps being a "suite" has no viable fulcrum, in light of the reality:

     

    It's long been admitted, established, and lamented that the Creative Suite apps, unfortunately, were neither conceived nor constructed in suite form, and that the histories of their respective code bases differ so widely, there is very little possibility of "unification" of features and functions. It's best just to avoid that line of thinking. It has no bearing.

     
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    Jun 18, 2013 1:15 PM   in reply to Mike Fernbank

    In this way they are similar [,,,] and should share some features that address this use.

    That value judgment ("should") is seemingly not shared by anyone at Adobe who exercises managerial oversight over both InDesign and Illustrator development teams.

     

    I thought that the apps had been re-written to make them more unified.

    It seems that they have, in some ways - just not the way that you need.

     

    you should be able to proof-print a section of a large poster in InDesign.

    There's that value judgment "should" again.   You can, but not without a bit of work:

     

    When I need to do this, I typically place the large-format document into a second, empty, letter-size InDesign document, and then resize the frame to grab just the bit I want to print out. Sometimes I will manually place the same image n times, then resize the frames and use the handy green whatchamacallit smart guides to ensure that all of my preview-frames are the same size. Then I manually move 'em to new pages. If I have to do this for a large number of identically sized posters (say, a H1N1 poster in forty languages) then I will save my proof-template, and then simply print -> relink to the the next poster -> print -> relink to the next poster, until I've printed out proofs for all forty posters.

     

    It's not that your need here is unusual or irrational, but it's clear that the tool in question doesn't have the feature that will automagically do this for you. It's a shame that your thread was derailed into a discussion of, what, product management? But rest assured: yes, the app will do what you need; no, the app will not do it all easily without some manual work.

     
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    Jun 18, 2013 1:17 PM   in reply to Joel Cherney

    Er, I suppose I meant that no one at Adobe who exercises managerial oversight over both InDesign and Illustrator development teams feels that this particular feature, or that the print dialog in general, must be harmonized to share features across the suite. Some features (e.g. the new dark interface) are getting this kind of standardization attention.

     
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    Jun 18, 2013 1:43 PM   in reply to Mike Fernbank

    Yes, it seems dumb not to have suite members not play well together, not to share nearly all their genetic makeup. It's understandable, perhaps, when embarking on a path to integrate disparate products.

     

    But, this may be part of the reasoning behind not actually tossing everything from every individual into the common melting pot:

     

    I have a faint memory of having heard or read something about laws that make it necessary for a company to isolate development groups. I can't pin down the issue, but there's something about being able to identify costs for each unique product or project, either for taxing issues, profit/loss reporting, and/or separability for the purpose of selling off one unit without giving away proprietary corporate-wide trade secrets. General Motors owns/owned the rights to all or much of SAAB's software, even after SAAB was sold by GM. Selling the SAAB corporation was bollixed up until the purchaser's rights in the software were clarified. I don't know the details, but the point is buying a factory, inventory, plans, talent, workforce, etc. are useless if you don't get control/ownership of the software that runs the product.

     

     

    HTH

     

     

    Regards,

     

     

    Peter

    _______________________

    Peter Gold

    KnowHow ProServices

     
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    Jun 18, 2013 2:39 PM   in reply to Mike Fernbank

    Mike Fernbank schrieb:

     

    … Perhaps they should try to keep InDesign from choking on .eps files (their own format!) and other productivity failures …

    You should realize that InDesign and Illustrator support eps completely, but it is an old format which is not capable to do a lot of things like transparency. Not the reason that InDesign or Illustrator cannot support eps is the reason, the reason is that with pdf and ai and psd we have much better oprtunities.

    Not that the Distiller is bad, but export is much better.

     

    And what other productivity failures do you mean? Name it.

     
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    Jun 19, 2013 7:40 AM   in reply to Mike Fernbank

    Hi, Mike:

     

    (I hope my wry humor, where it appears, comes through.)

     

    First of all, there's an unfortunate tendency to respond to long lists like yours as the whining of a negative person.

     

    In truth, irritations often yield improvement, like a grain of sand in an oyster that eventually generates a pearl. Yeah, it takes patience. It's probably uncomfortable for the oyster throughout its lifetime of creating something beautiful for someone who'll appreciate its "to-die-for" beauty and value. 

     

    Steve Jobs forced the delay of releasing the first iPhone when he found out how easily the display became scratched by keys in the pocket with his phone. AND!!! a cheap replaceable transparent overlay was NOT A SOLUTION TO ANYTHING except selling more cheap plasstic overlays!!!

     

    I don't have enough experience with the things you mention to know if your ideas are good or not. But it's clear that you're able to identify things that could be looked at and evaluated by folks who can do something about evaluating them. One thing you could consider is joining an Adobe pre-release team (aka "beta testing".) It's a bit like this recruiting ad that's often attributed to the antarctic explorer Shackleton: 

     

    "Men wanted for hazardous journey. Low wages, bitter cold, long hours of complete darkness. Safe return doubtful. Honour and recognition in event of success."

     

    But it's worse and it's better. Its wages are lower than low, they're none. The only honor/honour and recognition come from working with intelligent volunteers like yourself and with developers, and the knowledge that success is contributing something useful that can come back to you and other users. As to cold, and long hours in the dark - you tele-work wherever and whenever you choose. Unless you're a hyper-addictable type, there's no doubt about safe return.

     

    You can apply to join the community here: https://prerelease.adobe.com/login.html

     

    Good luck! if you decide to follow up.

     

     

    Regards,

     

     

    Peter

    _______________________

    Peter Gold

    KnowHow ProServices

     

    Mike Fernbank wrote:

     

    Well, I'm not going to drop everything to make a list, but I'll give a few examples. First, as an industrial designer, it is my professional opinion that the two applications have so much overlap one should be folded into the other. I'd keep AI and give it page layout ability. The conventional wisdom that the two applications have totally seperate functions is a fiction cleaverly marketed by Adobe, the idea being if you do a multi-page layout in AI or a single illustration in ID you are an amateur. This is simply not true. Many layouts fall into a gray area. Anyway, some specifics: hyphenation is handled differently, gradients are handled differently in both programs. They should be the same. The lasso tool does not behave as a lasso tool does in every other application, meaning it should select everything inside, not what it touches and what is inside (it should at least be a option.) AI cannot draw arcs or circles. An arc is a curve defined at a minimum by start and/or finish angle, included angle, radius and center point. A circle is a special arc of 360 degrees defined by diameter, radius and center point. Both shapes should be manipulated by these salient features. AI can do none of this. It is still very hard to simply clip a shape, the Pathfinder palette is overly complicated and obtuse. In AI, if a photo has a clipping mask the program behaves as if the entire photo is exposed. For example, an allign left command will align with the hidden part of the photo, not the visible part. In both applications you cannot select "through" an object. For example, if you have a bunch of rectangles with no fill stacked on each other you should be able to click on any of the strokes and select it (as may CAD programs do.) Instead, it behaves as if the objects are filled and you either have to put them on different layers and turn them on and off or do the clumsy "select next object below" menu. Both are painfully slow. I could go on, but there are many, many others.

     
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    Jun 19, 2013 12:51 PM   in reply to Mike Fernbank

    Mike Fernbank wrote:

     

    Thanks, Peter. In my case I certainly wasn't whining, I was asked for a list. Also, my job is designing things for people, specifically I design museum exhibitions. The process is pretty much the same. So when I say something is poorly implimented I'm speaking from over 30 years of seeing things done wrong and evaluating how they should be done correctly. Adobe is a garden variety case of a monopoly not needing to be concerned about having happy clients. The clients have no where else to turn (since the competition was either bought or marginalized). I'm very familiar with Shakleton's journey since have covered that here where I work. I serve on quite few committees for city planning and consult other not-for-profits institutions. In Adobe's case, since they are a for profit company, I'd only work for them if they pay me. I'm not going to give away my expertise for free to just any institution, it's how I make my living. Thanks for the suggestion!

    Mike

    You're welcome, Mike.

     

    Anybody who's been doing public museum exhibitions for as long as you have, must be doing something right.

     

    You could consider that the visitors aren't paying you, the museum pays you to attract visitors who will pay for the enrichment your exhibits provide.

     

    Adobe doesn't force folks to become volunteer pre-release testers. Most who do join are very smart and dedicated to being very selfish - they want something of value in exchange for testing. It varies by individual, but some of the valuable things are:

     

    • filing feature requests and bugs for inclusion or fixing in upcoming releases, with a stronger and better-directed voice that has a great chance to influence product development than posting them with public form here Wishform
    • being able to discuss the case for a requested feature with those who set priorities for what gets developed, and when, and with those who develop those features
    • advanced knowledge of the features in upcoming releases that can help in planning whether upgrading will have value that justifies the cost and/or effort
    • being able to evaluate and learn the new stuff before it's released,, use it for one's own professional purposes, and/or deliver it in the training, consulting, and instructional materials they create and perform on the first day the product ships

     

    Based on your list and comments, you have good ideas. Maybe this sounds like the kind of reward your job already affords you in addition to salary. If you don't have the bandwidth to consider applying to the pre-release program, at least consider filing your feature requests with the public wishform using the link above - airing comments here doesn't get them into the system. Good user suggestions often are incorporated into products, and users always benefit.

     

    Regards,

     

     

    Peter

    _______________________

    Peter Gold

    KnowHow ProServices

     
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