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No ASP/ASP.Net support in Dreamweaver CC

Jun 19, 2013 8:17 AM

Tags: #asp #dw #cc

Another Disabled or depreicated 'feature'. No ASP of ASP.Net support in DW CC.

 

At: * Vista/Windows 7: C:\Program Files (x86)\Adobe\Adobe Dreamweaver CC\Configuration\DisabledFeatures there are a some .mxp files to add these functions back.

Took the  steps required to convert mpx to ZXP.

http://www.projectseven.com/products/cloud-install.htm

 

The extension, ASP_JS_Support.mxp, once converted throws an error. It is searching for files in directories that do not exist. There is  Menus.xml file in the /configuration/Menus/ directory, the the 'element' is not in the file at all. See image below.

DWCC-error.jpg

This is my most required function.


When we open a new file, many file type starter pages are no longer available including ASP, Cold Fusion etc. Are these going to be added back?

DW-Filetypes.jpg

 

Add my voice to legions of others showing Our disappointment with DW CC's lack of support for developers. CC is simply a CSS, HTML WYSYWIG editor now. We should not have to load extensions to the primary program we use to develop our websites. While HTML 5 and CSS can develop great sites, the fact is there are millions of websites that function perfectly without these and will continue to do so.

 

IMHO Adobe focused completely on new technology, which is not even supported fully by browsers, and ignored technologies that are in use today. You missed by a mile and I regret purchasing a Cloud Account just to see what a drop shadow or curved border looks like in live view.

 

Support? Do I even need to go there?

 

I had such hopes for this version of DW, looks like CS6 will remain my main program.

 
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 19, 2013 8:19 AM   in reply to IM The Web Guy

    Hi Web Guy,

     

    Can you check out this discussion and let us know if you still need help?

     

     

    http://forums.adobe.com/thread/1236373?tstart=0

     

    Thanks,

    Preran

     
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    Jun 19, 2013 8:49 AM   in reply to IM The Web Guy

    Hi Web Guy,

     

    Sorry for the confusion. I have been quickly reading posts and missed the point, as in this case.

     

    Active support for ASP has currently been discontinued to make way for enhanced support for HTML5, CSS, and emerging web technologies. You will see an Adobe Blog post that will provide the messaging and the way ahead, but this is what I have for you now.

     

    Thanks,

    Preran

     
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    Jun 20, 2013 11:03 AM   in reply to IM The Web Guy

    IM The Web Guy -- You speak for many, myself included. The organization for which I do much of my work is sticking with its legacy applications and NOT planning on changing all of them overnight simply because Adobe decides that the future is here. Naturally, they may do so slowly or with newer applications, but SHAME on Adobe for not considering this! Not every client is in a hurry to spend tons of money on re-coding -- especially those with limited funds. [shocked] and [sad].

     
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    Jun 22, 2013 8:43 PM   in reply to IM The Web Guy

    I just noticed this problem in the trial Dreamweaver CC too.  Will be uninstalling tomorrow and stick with CS6 and Expression Web Designer. Not supporting ASP & ASP.NET is a deal breaker. I don't think I'm even going to bother learning what else is new in Dreamweaver CC. *sigh*

     
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    Jun 23, 2013 3:53 AM   in reply to Adamz197777

    I'm not sure why Adobe deleted the linked archive of deprecated features over time found here ( http://helpx.adobe.com/dreamweaver/kb/deprecated-features-dreamweaver. html ), the closest article they have left is here ( http://kb2.adobe.com/community/publishing/923/cpsid_92324.html ).

     

    Regardless, ASP.NET support was deprecated back at CS4.  If you added a number to CC this would be CS7.  So we have been since 2008 with no support for ASP.NET.  Classic ASP was technically supported, although there were many articles posted about the server behaviors being out of date, on both ASP and PHP sides, which caused Adobe to listen to the masses and discontinue legacy support for that if they were not going to be updated because I think we can all agree it would be better to remove something that could potentially open up security holes across the web then to leave it in for legacy's sake.

     

    While Preran speaks for Adobe and gives the official answer, many within the community believe the reason why support was removed goes back to the reasoning of why Adobe bought Macromedia.  Reason being that they cannot develop products around a proprietary technology, in this case Microsoft's, without their development lagging behind.  And the other part of the reason was the numbers game.  Based on 2 recent surveys ( http://news.netcraft.com/archives/category/web-server-survey/ , http://w3techs.com ) only 20% of servers run ASP/.NET.

     

    Since that decision was made in 2008 to discontinue .NET support, I would typically recommend that someone invested in ASP technologies to use what was Frontpage, and then Expression Web and now Visual Studio Web Designer ( http://www.microsoft.com/visualstudio/eng/products/visual-studio-expre ss-products ).  There's not really much else I can recommend that comes to mind.

     
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    Jun 23, 2013 4:56 AM   in reply to SnakEyez02

    Hi SnakEyez02, all

     

    Thank you.  It's true that Dreamweaver is moving towards standards-based web technologies. As I said previously, we are collecting all feedback, and will be sharing our roadmap with everyone very soon covering how we will be prioritizing our work based on various inputs from our users. The idea is to evolve Dreamweaver into the kind of software that will meet the demands of current and future web standards while still remaining light on its feet.

     

    We are still providing Dreamweaver CS6 for some time to ensure that we don't leave those users behind who are working with technologies where we are limiting our focus. And as you know already, you can run Dreamweaver CS6 and CC in parallel which means you will always have a choice of working with the latest features while maintaining your current workflows.

     

    About the broken links, apologies in advance. The policy is to unpublish documents that have ceased to be popular or cannibalizing the popularity of our latest, updated documents. Having said that, I will check with the team about the reason why these links don't work any more.

     

    Our presence on various social platforms and on the pre-release forum is testimony to the fact that we are hearing every one very seriously. Instead of multiple posts that will confuse everyone, we want to complete the process of listening before we publish a comprehensive reply.

     

    Thanks,

    Preran

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 23, 2013 5:30 AM   in reply to Preran

    Preran wrote:

     

    Our presence on various social platforms and on the pre-release forum is testimony to the fact that we are hearing every one very seriously. Instead of multiple posts that will confuse everyone, we want to complete the process of listening before we publish a comprehensive reply.

     

    Thanks,

    Preran

    Namaste Preranji,

     

    Thank you for this bit of information that Adobe is listening to all the wailing and gnashing of teeth. When (approximately at least) do you think Adobe would be making said "comprehensive reply?" In a week? A month? How long?

     

    VL Branko

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 23, 2013 1:45 PM   in reply to VL Branko

     

    The post is scheduled to go live next week unless something this week causes a delay in its posting. I will announce it on the forum as soon as I get the information.

     

    The idea of the creative cloud is to provide multiple software with special capabilities that play well with each other. This reduces the burden on one software to cater to every need. If you have a look at the current set, you will get a feel of what I am saying.

     

    Also, it is worthwhile to consider that changes in the web space have been more disruptive than most of the other domains. Dreamweaver is in a unique space where it has to cater to the demands of next generation standards and technologies while taking users on older technologies for the ride.

     

    Thanks,

    Preran

     
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    Jun 23, 2013 8:39 PM   in reply to Preran

    Danyavada, Preranji I look forward to reading it.

     
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    Jun 25, 2013 4:28 AM   in reply to SnakEyez02

    20% is a very large number.  The Apple iPhone has less than 20% of the smartphone market share (http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-the-iphones-market-sha re-is-dead-in-the-water-2013-5) and that's an extremely propietary technology. Yet Dreamweaver now supports building apps for that.

     

    Wasn't the selling point of Dreamweaver supposed to be that it would be one tool for using any of the web programming languages?  Now it's just PHP I guess. 

    I'll have to try Visual Studio Express Web Designer. Thanks for the link.  Usually I use the free Expression Web Designer 4 since its CSS support is better than Dreamweaver's in some ways (but there are other features that aren't as good of course).

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 25, 2013 6:27 AM   in reply to IM The Web Guy

    I'm looking at Microsoft® WebMatrix 3 http://www.microsoft.com/web/webmatrix/ --- very interesting! See also video "Introduction to WebMatrix" on PluralSight.com

    I'm keeping Dreamweaver CC for all it's other features, but I think I'm going to have to use WebMatrix a little bit for some of the features it has that Dreamweaver CC does not have.

    If I end up uninstalling it, well... I'm back in the same boat.

     

    Here are three images of Creating A New File in WebMatrix 3. (sorry Adobe, but you forced our hand!)

    WebMatrix1.png

    WebMatrix2.png

    WebMatrix3.png

     
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    Jun 26, 2013 12:01 AM   in reply to SnakEyez02

    I fully agree with this. I have been a DW user for many years now. Even before ADOBE got involved and it was still a Macromedia product. I tested the CC version on a trial base and have made the decision NOT to upgrade and will stick with CS6.

     

    The main reason I used it, was the fully integrated way data could be used on sites and I doubt that there are many sites out there that do not use some form of database for the backend. To drop this functionality, is a bit like leaving the engine out of a new car. Yes, it may be pretty and have very nice ways of building HTML sites, but where on earth does Adobe think the content comes from?

     

    I have also invested heavily in extensions for DW, which are almost all based on creating and retrieving content from a database. To now change that paradigm completely, will involve complete redevelopment of the sites I build and maintain.

     

    CMS is used extensively on the web, more so than "New Standards", so why drop this critical part of development?

     

    In my view, this is going to be the death knell of Dreamweaver for serious developers and site content management.

     

    Just my 2 cents worth.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 5, 2013 2:49 PM   in reply to Hans Kiesouw

    FWIW, once the "deprecated behaviors" are restored via the extension manager, DWCC has the same DB functionality as CS6.

     

    The fact remains, however, that defining previously supported database-driven web applications as "deprecated" ignores the reality that much of the existing fabric of the web is comprised of these technologies, which will be around for some time  and need continued support for the forseeable future.

     

    Although our company has used DW as our primary development tool since its inception, this decision on Adobe's part has prompted us to begin an agressive testing and review program of alternatives. I agree with Hans, that "this is going to be the death knell of Dreamweaver for serious developers and site content management".

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 5, 2013 3:59 PM   in reply to Adamz197777

    Adamz, the bigger picture for mobile is that while Apple represents 20% of mobile devices sold worldwide, Apple's model is more profitable with 74% of all mobile app revenue coming from iOS ( http://techland.time.com/2013/04/16/ios-vs-android/ ), so the people who use Apple spend money and the people using Android don't.

     

    With that said, the larger point I was making is that this change has been occuring over time and no one has been disappointed in the fact that the code is outdated, nor that ASP.NET support was dropped back in 2008 at it is only becoming an issue now 5 years later.  The problem is that the vocal part of the Dreamweaver community has been moving towards PHP for quite some time now and no one else spoke up.  Dreamweaver's initial reasoning for moving away from supporting ASP was that in the original 2 year waiting period between major CS releases, Microsoft could make many updates to the ASP platforms since they control the code and the development and DW always lagged behind.  Maybe if the ASP community becomes more vocal again about the type of support they are looking for, I think Adobe may be in a better position to support it with their always updating Cloud model.

     

    Furthermore, I don't disagree with Hans that moving to support CMS platforms wasn't the brightest move and gave many in that field the wrong impression of what DW does.  Because DW does not give those users a WYSIWYG which is what I think they were looking for.  However, on that same topic, I don't think it was wrong of Adobe to deprecate the old database features.  They were dated, insecure, and had no place in a professional development environment.  I would argue that what DW needs at this point is a more comprehensive SQL editor and querying system.  Not the pre-made garbage we had, but something to help with professional development and to test queries against the server to make sure they are using proper amounts of server resources and have reasonable execution times. 

     
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    Jul 5, 2013 4:11 PM   in reply to SnakEyez02

    This:

     

    "something to help with professional development and to test queries against the server to make sure they are using proper amounts of server resources and have reasonable execution times."

     

    DW as it was allowed for fast creation of a few basic commands (recordset, insert, update, repeat/show/hide region) that could then be quickly and easily tweaked. Not having to manually code everything has historically been a huge time saver and the compelling reason to use DW.

     
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    Jul 6, 2013 7:35 AM   in reply to RS5513

    While I do agree that mobile is fast becoming a very important model for site development, for Adobe to drop data bindings and the usual record set building, is really what - I believe - will drive developers to find products that will allow an easy and rapid combination of data driven content to their sites.

     

    I am aware that there are some extension builders and "Adobe Partners" that have created add ons that will return these facilities to DW, but this seems to be an external fix, rather than keeping it as native support.

     

    Almost all the sites I have built for clients, use a database for managing and sorting content, be they on line stores, portal sites for specific niche markets, or "one line brochures" of their organisation. Using a database to store content and then having it show on the site, does require a data binding, no matter what server model is being used: PHP/MySQL or any flavour of Microsoft's equivalent or anything else out there.

     

    Converting all the data to XML files also seems extremely inefficient and really slow, by comparison.

     

    Not everyone is going to use an APP for any given site, that is the reality, people search for things and they visit sites and then "participate" in the sites they like. Be they IOS users, or Andriod (BTW Andriod is now the biggest - sorry Apple).

     

    Yes, I will certainly be on the lookout for an alternative product and stay with the older version of DW, until I find something suitable.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 15, 2013 10:07 AM   in reply to Hans Kiesouw

    OK Adobe. You officialy suck at everything. No Fireworks. No data binding. No ASP. No Dreamweaver CS6 download option after deleting it and learning that DW CC sucks after all that made it great is gone. The people have no options when those who provide solution think they know best for us - be they government or software providers. Both suck! <% end rant %>

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 15, 2013 10:18 AM   in reply to RobbRokk

    Trying to use the Adobe Extension Manager to install ASP support but i get the error that Dreamweaver Version 11 or greater is required. Converted to ZXP as well and get the same error. This is so ridiculous. What a joke this has become after waiting for a year for DW CS6's FTP issues to be resolved and now this.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 15, 2013 2:34 PM   in reply to RobbRokk

    RobbRokk wrote:

     

    OK Adobe. You officialy suck at everything. No Fireworks. No data binding. No ASP. No Dreamweaver CS6 download option after deleting it and learning that DW CC sucks after all that made it great is gone. The people have no options when those who provide solution think they know best for us - be they government or software providers. Both suck! <% end rant %>

     

    Adobe does not suck at everything - Just at their understanding how to develop good solid products for web development and design. Always slow and laggy reactive behaviour on their part throughout the years.

     

    They always have had trouble with that. Which is the reason why they took over Macromedia in the first place. Adobe has been relying on Macromedia's legacy for far too long.

     

    At least, that is my opinion.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 15, 2013 2:50 PM   in reply to RobbRokk

    RobbRokk wrote:

     

    No Dreamweaver CS6 download option after deleting it and learning that DW CC sucks after all that made it great is gone.

     

    I think this is what you need...

     

    http://helpx.adobe.com/creative-cloud/kb/download-previous-versions-cr eative-applications.html

     
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    Jul 15, 2013 3:04 PM   in reply to Jon Fritz II

    That would seem to be a logical expectation. Except that Adobe now sucks and the app manager didn't allow me to click CS6, then the app manager updated and deleted any evidence of CS6. After an hour of searching and getting caught in CC marketing loops, I found where to download CS6. Did I mention the suckage?

     
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    Jul 16, 2013 5:29 AM   in reply to RS5513

    agressive testing and review program of alternatives

     

    As you go.. or when you're finished... Please let us know the results of your testing and review of program alternatives.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 19, 2013 8:20 AM   in reply to karindpowell

    So how the hell are we supposed to edit .asp files in dreamweaver. If we can't then I will be cancelling my subscription.

     
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    Jul 19, 2013 8:30 AM   in reply to FireworkCrazy

    Thing is for me. I use ecommerce software (VP-ASP) which is built on ASP. I don't need the asp to "talk" to anything, I just want to edit the graphical and text content on the pages. However, I now can't even do that with Dreamweaver.

     
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    Jul 19, 2013 8:36 AM   in reply to FireworkCrazy

    What I don't understand is that by dropping support for .asp files people aren't going to go.... "ooo Dreamweaver doesn't support ASP anymore, I must use that instead of xxx" But by not supporting it your going to lose customers???? Where is the logic in that?

     
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    Jul 19, 2013 10:52 PM   in reply to FireworkCrazy

    Now you need to go back to CS6. The only problem then is that you cannot re-associate .asp extensions to DW in Finder on Mac.

     

    Robb Smith

    [Sensitive Information Removed]

     

    Message was edited by: Sudarshan Thiagarajan. Please refrain from posting your mobile numbers/ e-mail addresses as this is a public forum.

     
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    Jul 19, 2013 8:51 AM   in reply to FireworkCrazy

    I have posted few steps that worked for me on this thread http://forums.adobe.com/message/5520693#5520693

     
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    Jul 19, 2013 4:20 PM   in reply to bgupta16

    When I follow the instructions above, clicking more info then selecting CS6 from the drop down. I get the download link, but when I click on it it says.

     

    Dreamweaver is a desktop app so you'll want to download it from your computer.

     


     
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    Jul 19, 2013 9:03 PM   in reply to FireworkCrazy

    This does not relate to what I have posted..Please explain more on what are you trying to do and when do you get that message?

     
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    Jul 20, 2013 2:55 AM   in reply to bgupta16
     
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    Jul 23, 2013 11:01 AM   in reply to IM The Web Guy

    Realy.... Really!  Very short sighted!

     
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    Jul 26, 2013 10:50 AM   in reply to KirbyQ64

    I love Dreamweaver, have used it for years for a lot of my front end web development and I work a lot with asp and asp.net technologies. Trying to work with some .asp files now and am really noticing the change. May have to start using expression studio. Shame

     

    This was really short sighted on Adobes part.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 11, 2013 10:30 AM   in reply to WiseyD203

    Same here WiseyD203

     

    I have been using dreamweaver for years strating with MX, and since I was on CS5, I thought... hum at 20.00 a month it could be a very good price to always get the latest version.  So I downloaded the trial version of it.  What was my suprise after starting it for the first time that there was no asp or aspx files.  Si I said again hum....  I went and opened an asp files and it seem that the intellisense is still there,  I did not go further, but as of this point I am very disapointed.  Of course I WILL NOT get that subscription and will stick to CS5, Visual Studio 2010 - 2012 and Expression studio, all of the above can be free version also.  Imagine free and doing what I need as opposed to NOT free and NOT doing what I need.  The choice is OBVIOUS don't you think?

     

    Everything I have developed in the past few years was originaly on Coldfusion and when they stop supporting it I went to asp. Now this is the second time I get f..ked by Adobe and had to go another way.  First with CF and now with ASP.   Like they say;  Foll me once shame on you, fool me twice shame on me.

     

    So I guess this is the last time.  Adobe I don't get the way you are thinking and you should probably ask your users before deciding for them.  Just look at Microsoft and XBOX ONE and Windows 8.  They listened and then they adjusted.  Amybe you should do the same.  Until the time you give us back asp and aspx, you can forget about me.

     
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    Aug 14, 2013 8:57 AM   in reply to IM The Web Guy

    Count me in. I just found out the hard way. All of my existing .ASP files stop uploading dependant files (including basic stuffs like images and css). Dreamweaver CC is totally removing the support for ASP (and CFM). Very disappointed. I need to go back to CS6 just for the sake of working with .ASP and .CFM files.

     

    How I understand Adobe Dreamweaver's road map:

    For ASP, use Microsoft product. For CFM, use Adobe ColdFusion Builder. Dreamweaver is staying away from proprietary formats.

     
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    Aug 16, 2013 12:48 AM   in reply to sfainc0110

    The solution is simple, and doesn't require all that much more effort on Adobe's part.

     

    Of alll the middleware technologies that have been around, it's come down to only two: PHP and ASP.NET. One isi open source, the other is proprietary. Keep PHP and keep up with PHP as it continues to develop. Forget the rest as part of the core program.

     

    However, always keep the others as extensions from whatever version they may have been built with, but no earlier than CS4. That should cover all legacy sites. I could be wrong. But developers, if you're still using Colf Fusion or JSP or ASP (either script type), is there really an advantage here or is it becaase that's what you've always used, are most comfortable with, or perhaps all you know?

     

    No disrepsoect intended, I may just be projecting. I held on to ASP for too long, and I rely a lot on third party extensions, even though I know the code pretty well. Even Microsoft itself long ago dropped classic ASP support and development, and my extension providers were moving away from it and dot-net as well. So I followed suit and went with PHP. A few years ago, PHP/MySQL perhaps could not hold up against the other tried and true solutions for performance and security, but, I'm pretty sure it's come a long way since then.

     

    I still don't get why support for middleware has been discarded altogether. What am I missing - are dynamic sites being built with HTML, CSS and JS? AJAX? If so, point me towards a tutorial, because it's not built into DW.

     

    Or what's going to happen is one of the primary extension providers will simply come out with their own editor, or we may even see a decent open source one out soon that supports extensions. If that happens, and the program is actually good, DW usage will fall.  But so what? Adobe still has the monopoly on all the other CS products and we will still need to keep our subscriptions up to date.

     
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    Aug 20, 2013 1:29 PM   in reply to Preran

    What you guys at Abode aren't grasping is that removing the ability to create a .Net page in the DW interface or the failure to even load a .net page into the editor from the site panel is just dumb! If you want to stop providing .net data integration tools, that fine. I get it. You will always be behind Microsoft in the features you can build into the editor. Understand that in a lot of firms, the designers use dreamweaver to style up the .net pages...or even create the new pages that the developers then code up. With this move you have just basically said not only are we not going to support any .net development, but we don't even want you to open your pages in our editor. ha very smooth, casting you lot in with the open source crowd is a dangerous course to take, people will soon expect you to offer your products as free to use too...

     

    But hey, what Adobe fails to realize is that while maybe only 20% of websites are built on the .net platform, almost all the business apps that run on the web are developed in .NET.

     
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    Aug 28, 2013 6:53 AM   in reply to IM The Web Guy

    I was struggling with this issue myself. I just found an workaround that at least gets .asp and .aspx files to appear in the design view. Just go to Edit>Preferences>File Types/Editors. Then click the plus sign to add an extension, put in ".asp .aspx". Then hit the other plus sign to add an editor and browse to the dreamweaver.exe file. Hit "Ok" to save the changes.

     

    Still no server behaviors, but at least I can edit legacy sites fairly easily. I'm using MS Visual Studio Express for Web (free) to build .net pages. That program has it's own set of quirks, but dropping in datasources, repeaters, etc is very easy. It doesn't do some important things as well as Dreamweaver - managing multiple sites easily, updating links when you move or rename a file, site-wide search and replace. It's tough to get away from the Dreamweaver workflow once you've become comfortable with it.

     
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