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No Compatibility for AS2 FLAs? Absurd.

Jun 21, 2013 9:47 PM

Will you consider adding compatibility please??

 

Love the dark interface - been waiting a long time for that actually. Never knew why it didn't happen when Photoshop got it. But very dissapointed that I cannot open FLAs with AS2 in them, perform an update, and simply export them back out.

 

Yea yea... I heard it - Adobe doesn't "support" AS2 anymore. But that doesn't mean that new products we are paying for should have zero "compatibility" with our previous work. Opening , editing, and closing an AS2 -based FLA file does not mean I am refusing to get on board with AS3 after a million years. It is a simple necessity. I prefer AS3 for coding to AS2. I get the focus on the latest scripting rev. I get that it uses the better VM that runs 10 times more efficiently blah blah - so better for mobile etc. (probably the motivator here). So, no longer "supporting" AS2 programmers - as in being there to help/encourage people who still write it etc - is understandable at this stage. BUT to disable the ability to open a legacy file with AS2 in it - perform a simple edit and reexport it - is a horrific decision. Here is just one real world example of why.

 

The group I work with has developed HUNDREDS of learning modules and tools over the last DECADE using Flash. Some of tools are complex interactive games etc - that require updates from time to time based on requests. Am I supposed to entirely recode them so I can use my new software? This as opposed to spending 15 minutes on an update and export? Each lesson module uses a custom designed AS2-coded shell environment that loads - on average - 30-50 external swf files - all coded in AS2 themselves because the shells cannot load AS3. To go backwards and reprogram the shells themselves (very complex), as well as all the interactivity and videos and buttons and audio and testing that is inside these shell-loaded swf files (numbering in the thousands likely) would be an enormous and absurdly wasteful undertaking.They regularly need small or minute updates to their content - mere text changes here and there even - previously taking only minutes to perform. Now, if I export the swf, it will be AS3 and won't work. These updates are done regularly. Are we supposed to now say "hey - client - guess what - your stuff needs to be completely retooled for no good reason - even tho it runs beautifully as-is" ?? I can't even open an FLA and export it out if it has AS2 in it??? I don't expect Adobe "support" in regards to new AS2 projects, but backwards "compatibility" is another thing. Some people have a ton of work still being used on a regular basis that was written prior to AS3 being the standard - and the clients don't care about AS3 - they care about their budgets.

 

I will have to keep Flash CS6 installed apparently, even tho I pay 50 bucks a month for the CC. Flash - for many of us interactive devs, who build stuff for government contracts and/or big companies that are still running IE7 and IE8 across their corporations (with no intention of updating anytime in the near future - believe it) have no option other than Flash, so we still spend an incredible amount of time in this tool. I can't just kick out static down-staged images for these guys with my magical Edge Animate software. Great product too - which I use for other things - but not the silver bullet of online animation/interactivity by any stretch of the imagination.

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 21, 2013 9:56 PM   in reply to The Jayster

    Hi Jayster,

     

    The older version FLA can be opened in Flash Pro CC.

     

    If it contains dropped features, few examples of what will happen are:

    1. Inverse Kinematics are converted to frame-by-frame animations
    2. TLF text is converted to classic, static text. TLF text embedded within PSD or AI files are also converted to classic text when imported in Flash Pro CC.
    3. ActionScript 1 / ActionScript 2:
      1. Publish Settings is defaulted to ActionScript 3
      2. AS2 code attached to any instance on stage will be removed (because actions on instances is not supported in AS3)
      3. AS2 components will be carried forward as placeholders, but cannot be used to create new content on stage. Also, they will generate compile errors in AS3.

     

    Reference documentation: http://helpx.adobe.com/flash/using/opening-cs6-files-cc.html

     

    Also note that you will be able to open fla created in Flash Pro CC , back in CS6 if you need to add AS2 code and complie.

     

    Hope you find this useful.

     

    -Sujai

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 22, 2013 11:02 AM   in reply to The Jayster

    I feel ya The Jayster

    Here is my rant...

     

    I work for a large company with a ton of legacy files that need updating periodically.

    Just had to work on something just the other day because the path to a server needed updating.

    This would be impossible to do in Flash.CC unless I recoded the whole app.

    Nobody is going to pay for that when it works perfectly already for years.

    If you have to maintain legacy code for several sites you need to be able to edit any file you have ever created.

    I started out with Flash 4 ( 1998 ) and have had every single version since.

    Even when there was very little offered in the upgrade.

    I will not be using Flash.CC though.

     

    1) I need to edit legacy files.

    2) I will not rent software.

    3) I do not agree with the restrictions imposed by CC

    4) There is no way to edit new files created in Flash.CC if you quit.

    Saving as CS6 version will loose forward features added in Flash.CC

    ( Exporting to Dart would be an example );

    I could think of more reasons but whats the point.

     

    These are my gripes with Adobe.

     

    1) Went to a "rent to use" software model.

    2) Ended support for mobile browsers.

    3) Removed design view from FlashBuilder.

    4) Cant edit legacy files in Flash.CC

     

    I am also sad to see Fireworks go bye bye.

    That was also in my original Macromedia Suite along with Dreamweaver.

    I have upgraded those too over the years.

    I'm sure that Dreamweaver will be next on the chopping block.

     

    Guess we have little choice but to stick with what works.

     

    I have recently been tasked with converting our video chat product to HTML5/CSS3/JS

    I decided to use Sencha for the framework.

    Although I have been able to recreate the interface and most of the functionality there are some huge roadblocks only Flash can handle.

     

    1) Broadcast your Webcam/Microphone via any Desktop browser or Mobile app.

    2) RTMP support for live video encoded from a browser or app, RemoteSharedObjects and onSync events.

     

    So I guess I will be stuck in the muck along with you.

    Shame on Adobe for self destructing and alienating its long time fatefull customers.

     

    I have always been gung-ho for Flash but my ho's been gunged.

     
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  • kglad
    72,371 posts
    Jul 21, 2002
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 22, 2013 12:21 PM   in reply to The Jayster

    if you have as2 projects that you could edit before you install flash cc, you still have an as2 editor that works with those files.  installing flash cc does not require removing any previous flash cs versions.

     

    in fact, keeping older versions of flash has been needed for, at least, 10 years if you need to save fla files in formats compatible with flash versions more than 1 version older than the current version.  that aggrevation is old news.  there's no significant additional aggrevation with the current state of affairs.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 22, 2013 12:34 PM   in reply to The Jayster

    Folks!

     

    removing AS2 it's one step for removing old features and this is only one right step to the future. If you have any as2 files and want to edit they - u can use old flash version. But coding with as2 it's like driving a horse in the city between cars. When cars will fly what than? You will be ready for this or still driving a horse?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 22, 2013 1:13 PM   in reply to The Jayster

    Sure clients have as2 project that work prefectly And you can offet swtich to new as3 Not for free ofcoarse

    But as game and media developer I see why Flash Player Next was not releaseed. It's because big amount developers that still use as2. If they all will not publish for as2 anymore - this can just speed-up whole flash player developer team extend and impove Flash performance because they will not waste time for old as2...

     

    But if you really need as2 - just install old flash professional

     
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  • kglad
    72,371 posts
    Jul 21, 2002
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 22, 2013 1:15 PM   in reply to The Jayster

    i don't know how you avoided clients that didn't have the latest nor the one prior to the latest version of flash.  i even keep a log of which clients have what versions so i don't have to always ask them what flash version they're using.

     

    i have one computer that has cs3, cs4, cs5, cs5.5, cs6 and now cc for the sole purpose of saving down to versions compatible with client versions.  i could get by with every other version up to a certain point but i've never had a compatibility issue so i've always left the old versions alone.

     
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  • kglad
    72,371 posts
    Jul 21, 2002
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 22, 2013 1:14 PM   in reply to Anton Azarov

    see my message 5.  no matter whether cc supported as2 or not, you would still need your older versions of flash if you have to send edited fla files to clients that do not have the latest (or one prior) version.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 22, 2013 6:13 PM   in reply to The Jayster

    Once again I have to agree with The Jayster.

    The external contractors I have to work with always keep their software up to date. The last time I recieved one that was incompatible with my version I was the one who had to upgrade.

    I would never ask   them to revert to an old version for me.

    Every version reverted will loose potential functionality and would not be professional IMO.

     

    All we are saying is until now, We can open every .FLA ever created since Flash 4 ( Maybe earlier but I cannot say first hand ) with FlashCS6 and save it to  the current version or 1 prior if needed.

     

    With all due respect,

    I should not need to maintain old software.

    I never had to do that before.

     

    Even if Adobe changes their mind about this rental software B.S and they do offer a standard upgrade.

    I can no longer just use the most current version for all of my needs.

    Something I have always had with Flash.

     

    Its a shame whats going on.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 23, 2013 8:47 AM   in reply to The Jayster

    This is especially hurtful because anyone without blinders on can see that the Flash tool probably has very little future. If we're really lucky, we'll be able to limp along indefinitely like Director. So it's not like this is aimed at masses of new AS3 developers that Adobe expects. No one with any sense who doesn't know Flash would invest the time in learning AS3, so why not support the existing developers as well as possible as the tool slides into obscurity.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 23, 2013 8:57 AM   in reply to The Jayster

    I think expecting Adobe to remotely care how much the companies using their tools have invested in applications built on top of their tools or how big those companies are ignores the fact that this is not the first time Adobe has abandoned such companies (probably the very same companies in many cases). There once was a tool called Authorware, which was used to produce training for huge companies and the US government. Adobe dropped it like a rock as soon as the acquisition of Macromedia was finalized.

     

    I think it's highly likely that at least some of these companies will get to the point where they won't embrace Adabe technologies, because any idiot can see that it's only a matter of time until that particular rug gets pulled out. I guess Adobe's new business model is to cater toward the one born in the next minute, as the ones who fell for it last time move on to other tools.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 24, 2013 6:30 AM   in reply to The Jayster

    I don't think Flash has a long future in gaming, either. Unity is no longer supporting Flash, and most of the game devs I know who were working in Flash a year or two ago are not working in it anymore.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 24, 2013 9:52 AM   in reply to The Jayster

    ...and right there is why Adobe decided I wasn't a good fit for the Adobe Community Professional (well Adobe Community Expert at the time) program LOL

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 24, 2013 10:07 AM   in reply to Amy Blankenship

    Could be Flash as future of games or not - this can be easy changed in one day. And this depends only from Adobe If they today will change main idea and workflow of the Flash Runtime - they will have realy great platform

     

    Simple steps that can give a new born of Flash it's develop if from the ground up as new plugin and don't integrate with old capabilities

    I'm not talking about returning to the Flash AS Next dialog. I'm telling about realy new and re-factored plugin Without any AS2 capabilities. Stop improvement flex, as2, lite and hurl all effort into new player

    That will as Unity3D work much efficiently and without vector graphics But we all understand that almost impossible - it's require big funds spending

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 24, 2013 10:15 AM   in reply to Anton Azarov

    At now days I see a big insteresting from clients in Flash games because they can be played in web, desktop and mobile as application. And Flash have big performance advantage comparing to HTML5.

    HTML5 have low performance on my iPad 2,3,4 with the same projects. So I don't know why HTML5 can be better

     
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  • kglad
    72,371 posts
    Jul 21, 2002
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 24, 2013 11:42 AM   in reply to The Jayster

    here are some differing (from ab's) viewpoints on flash for gaming, http://max.adobe.com/sessions/online.html?sdid=KEWZQ#tv

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 16, 2013 12:40 PM   in reply to The Jayster

    I agree. Someone needs to be fired for this.

     
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