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bleasy1
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Audio in timline, please simplify for me...

Jun 25, 2013 11:42 PM

Hey guys, Steve from England, I am used to premeiere elements 10 and when my film is on the timeline and i want to adjust the audio as i go along, i simply move the sliders and adjust and it stays like that without any further adjustments. Now in cs6 prem pro new to it? i have 4 audio tracks and three video tracks, during vows and speeches i am adding music and want to reduce at certain points with the sliders, but the thing is i have to watch the whole dam movie again to change track 1, then watch again for track 2 and so on, its driving me nuts. There must be a dam simpler way like elemnts 10 that uses just one slider, cmon guys this is supposed to be easier than elements or am i stupid...Help

 
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 26, 2013 7:16 AM   in reply to bleasy1

    I don't really understand what you're trying to accomplish, especially with you stating that you have to watch your video repeatedly to adjust each audio track.

     

    But I've also never used Premiere Elements.

     

    It sounds like you're using a multi-camera setup, and want to combine the audio from all of them.  Why?  You should stick with the 1 (or 2, if you need ambient sound) best audio sources.  You should also be editing it as a multi-camera sequence.  For details, visit http://helpx.adobe.com/premiere-pro/using/editing-multi-camera-sequenc es1.html

     

    If you still want to combine all the audio tracks together, you can create a nested sequence of just the audio, and then place it into your final sequence.  This will essentially put all of your audio on a single track, which you can then use track keyframes to adjust the levels throughout.

     

    Let me know if you have any questions!

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 26, 2013 7:59 AM   in reply to joshweiland

    I've also never used Elements. Also never use the "Audio Mixer" in Premiere - I just use keyframes in the audio clips to adjust volume levels right in the timeline.

     

    On each audio track, hit the twirly to open up the audio track to see the waveform, and there is a yellow line running across and that is the volume. Click and drag up or down with mouse to affect volume. Use Ctrl-click to add a keyframe (node) to the yellow line. Add two of these close together and then drag the second one down to "ramp down the volume", two more later to "ramp up" again. That is how I control levels for multiple audio tracks on weddings and stage events using 3 or more mics.

     

    I do believe in the audio mixer that you can "latch" the audio so that you can adjust on the fly while playing video and your changes will be added to the timeline, but probably kind of hard to manage in realtime with multiple tracks. Like I said, I just don't use the mixer at all, never have. I just work my way along the timeline previewing and adjusting as I go.

     

    Another little trick for audio - rather than ramping the sound up and down with keyframes, maybe you want the audio ON, then OFF, such as when switching mics in a wedding edit. You can just use the Razor to put a cut where you want to fade out a mic, then drag volume all the way down on clip segment following the cut, and drop an audio dissolve onto the cut to fade it smoothly, and you can adjust length of that transition as needed. So more than one way to do things.

     

    Note that if you use the "MultiCam" feature to edit the video, you only get one track of audio and still need to go back later and rework all of that, so I don't even use MC and just do it all in my timeline. There's not really a right or wrong way, just whatever methods you are comfortable using.

     

    Thanks

     

    Jeff Pulera

    Safe Harbor Computers

     
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    Jun 27, 2013 8:50 PM   in reply to bleasy1

    cmon guys this is supposed to be easier than elements

     

    Actually the other way around.  As the names imply, Elements is for the amateur, and is easier to use.  Premiere Pro is for the professional, and is far more capable, but that capability does also add complexity and a steeper learning curve.

     
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