Skip navigation
Currently Being Moderated

100% zoom is too small on screen

Jun 30, 2013 10:34 AM

Hello, I'm using photoshop CC on amacbook pro retina. I mainly use photoshop for web design and when I open a document that is 300x200 px, the 100% view is too small on screen. Any ideas, It was this way on PS cs6 also before I upgraded. I just tried to delete the prefs file and restarted PS and it did not change. I have also tried to change my screen resolution to "best for retina" and it is still the same.

 

Steve

 
Replies 1 2 3 ... 5 Previous Next
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 30, 2013 10:58 AM   in reply to pmlink360

    Photoshop has adjusted the software to compensate for retina increased resolution.  100% view should be accurate.  Other programs with out compensation may look 2X bigger.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 30, 2013 12:22 PM   in reply to pmlink360

    OK, I am having a brain fog, but it is a mac thing.  You need to turn off a feature so it displays normally like a window rather than what you are seeing.  Does that ring any bells?

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 30, 2013 12:47 PM   in reply to Curt Y

    Think it is called the Application Frame. 

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 1, 2013 12:09 PM   in reply to pmlink360

    Maybe I'm misunderstanding your issue. That looks about correct for a 200px X 300px on a MacBook Pro retina at 100%.

    You can View> 200% to see approximately how the image would display on on a non-retina device.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 1, 2013 10:00 AM   in reply to pmlink360

    I'm having this exact same issue. I'm using Photoshop CC on a Macbook Pro with Retina display. When I am editing images, the resolution image size says that it is enormous but the actual editing view shows it at nearly half the size. Zooming in doesn't fix it -- everything is just blurry as if the image is actually tiny. When I save as a jpg, the image saves in the correct size, but it's impossible to properly edit before.

     

    Any help for this issue would be very appreciated! Thanks.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 15, 2013 5:07 AM   in reply to KalebN

    Yep, I'm the same – I'm needing to have a second monitor attached so I can make sure I'm seeing it at the same size other people will. It's wierd, but when you move the application window from a retina screen to a traditional screen, all the elements (palattes, menu items, toolbars) remain proportionally the same, but the image increases to the right size. Then when you take it back to retina, it does a "minimise" for the image, while everything else fits.

     

    Would be nice if there was some way to change the resolution/appearance of the workspace, because you can't develop for the web like it is.

     

    Seems like I'm missing something.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 15, 2013 5:25 AM   in reply to pmlink360

    The image in the screenshot is 300px by 200px so View > 100% seems to work exactly as intended (one image pixel is represented by one screen pixel).

    Like Charles Badland pointed out you can use another magnification if 100% does not meet your needs.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 15, 2013 5:57 AM   in reply to c.pfaffenbichler

    Unfortunately that is not the answer – at 200% it's pixelated. I need to work in the resolution that the user (and I) will see.

     

    It's straightforward – when you view the page/image in Safari/Firefox/Chrome you see it at 100%. It should be appearing at the same resolution in Photoshop, not the 50% (or thereabouts) that it is.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 15, 2013 6:01 AM   in reply to Quaetapo

    View > 100% is intended to display the image so that one image pixel is being represented by one screen pixel regardless of your screens resolution.

     

    How do you work with screens of different resolutions and expect pixel images of certain pixel-dimensions to be displayed identically?

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 15, 2013 6:15 AM   in reply to Quaetapo

    It's straightforward – when you view the page/image in Safari/Firefox/Chrome you see it at 100%.

    Sorry, I missed that … are you saying the images are upsampled when displayed by the browsers when displaying on your retina display?

     

    Edit: While this could of course cause confusion/irritation in my opinion it does not change the fact that Photoshop’s 100% display size seems to work just as intended.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 15, 2013 2:31 PM   in reply to c.pfaffenbichler

    It seems more that the images are downsized in Photoshop. Everything appears as you would normally expect in the browser, but when you see it in Photoshop its significantly reduced.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 15, 2013 2:56 PM   in reply to pmlink360

    I just upgraded to a new Retina Display MacBook Pro and had this problem start today as well. Here is a screenshot of an image I found online that is 1280x720. On the web it is huge compared to the same image opened in photoshop at 100%. SS.jpg

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 15, 2013 4:10 PM   in reply to adamleewermuthmavs

    That describes it much better than I – thanks for the contribution Adam.

     

    Now, if we can just find someone to help/explain/sort out.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 15, 2013 5:27 PM   in reply to Quaetapo

    In Photoshop, 100% means each pixel you see on the screen is one pixel of the image. A 15-inch Retina display has 227 pixels per inch. A 200-pixel by 300-pixel image at this resolution then is 200 ÷ 227, or 0.88 inches, by 300 ÷ 227, or 1.32 inches. pmlink360's screen shot shows this.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 15, 2013 6:31 PM   in reply to Semaphoric

    I'd be surprised that Adobe weren't aware of this and therefore provide some ability to be able to display a graphic as it would appear on different devices. All well and good to be literal in their interpretation of the resolution, but not much help when you're designing for the large variety of screens out there.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 15, 2013 11:05 PM   in reply to Quaetapo

    It seems more that the images are downsized in Photoshop.

    No.

    When you open your pmlink360’s (edited) screenshot and measure the image area you will notice that is is 300px by 200px.

     

    View > 100% means that one image pixel will be represented by one screen pixel (as mentioned before) and that means that on a screen with smaller pixels this will naturally result in a smaller display of an image of certain pixel dimensions.

     

    If the browsers you mentioned detect the screen resolution and upsample the image that may be fine for them (to test please make a screenshot and measure the actual pixel dimensions of the image) but for Photoshop as a pixel oriented image editor resampling the image for a 100% view would seem an odd choice.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 15, 2013 11:11 PM   in reply to adamleewermuthmavs

    I just upgraded to a new Retina Display MacBook Pro and had this problem start today as well. Here is a screenshot of an image I found online that is 1280x720. On the web it is huge compared to the same image opened in photoshop at 100%.

    And yet the image in Photoshop is 720px high.

    As you said it is.

    So the browser must have upscaled it, mustn’t it? 

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Noel Carboni
    23,455 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 16, 2013 12:30 AM   in reply to Quaetapo

    What's the problem with using 200%?

     

    What does "It's pixelated" mean?  Your Retina display is so sharp it doesn't blur blocks of 2 x 2 pixels together as well as a 100 ppi display.

     

    Let me get this straight...

     

    You bought a display with pixels that are half the size of a run-of-the-mill 100 ppi display - ON PURPOSE, presumably so you could see things more sharply -  and now you're complaining that things shown at 100% pixel for pixel are too small or that zoomed displays are too sharp.

     

    Thanks for making me smile. 

     

    -Noel

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 16, 2013 12:38 AM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    Noel Carboni wrote:

     

    …Thanks for making me smile. 

     

    The original post already gave me a hearty belly laugh, from its very first line. 

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 16, 2013 12:40 AM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    I wonder if some people might think of »pixel« as a measurement unit for size.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 16, 2013 9:20 AM   in reply to pmlink360

    The problem is that for the last 10 years that I have been using photoshop on a mac, the images always displayed bigger and sharper on the screen no matter if I am connected to a monitor or not. Now that I have upgraded to a mac with retina display the images open smaller than I am use to. I, like the others asking for help are only asking if there is a setting somewhere that allows us to set it up so the images appear like they did before.

     

    Lets break out the ruler - Top image is the same picture I used before, on my mac screen in inches at 100%. Clearly it is showing bigger than an inch. Bottom image is the same picture at 100% but on my monitor hooked up to the mac and is really over 3 1/2 inches. This is how it use to display on my mac, nice and big and sharp. I am guessing it is a retina display issue.

     

    So without more condescending answers that help no one, is there a way to have the images display on my mac like they do on my monitor - the way they did before I had a retina display?

     

    Ruler.jpg

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Noel Carboni
    23,455 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 16, 2013 12:29 PM   in reply to adamleewermuthmavs

    I'm sorry, I don't mean to be condescending.  But the problem is you've paid extra for something that's actually an improvement, but now you don't want it to work any differently than what you had before.

     

    You don't appear to understand how images and displays actually work.  I'll try to provide an explanation...

     

    Images are made out of pixels.  Little squares of one and only one color each that when stacked in rows and columns together make up what we call an image.

     

    Your display has the ability to display little lighted squares of one and only one color each (it's really a bit more complicated than this, but I'm trying to keep it simple).  Stacked in rows and columns these tiny display sites make up your display screen.  Before the Retina display, every square inch had roughly 100 x 100 of these display sites.  Now (assuming a 15" Macbook Retina display) you have 220 x 220 of them in every square inch.

     

    In order to fit so many more in a square inch they have to be much smaller.  With me so far?  Each tiny display site is 1/220 of an inch on a side, by definition.

     

    When Photoshop displays an image, it sizes it per your guidance - you set the Zoom factor.

     

    100% zoom - by definition - means that one pixel from an image will occupy one display site on the screen.

     

    Can you now see how, since the display sites are much smaller on a Mac retina display, an image displayed at 100% will appear smaller?

     

    Now here's where some additional magic comes in:  The folks who programmed your operating system and browser realized that you would probably not like to see everything less than half the size it was, so they automatically use 200% (or more) zoom behind the scenes so that the pictures and stuff on web pages and application controls are displayed nice and big.  This happens with older non-retina applications automatically as well - it's called pixel doubling.

     

    To directly answer your question:

     

    Set an appropriate zoom level in Photoshop to make the image as large as you'd like to see it and you will be fine.

     

    It may help you to feel better to think, when you see the sharp edges of the pixels at zoomed-in sizes, that you have a display that's got such high resolution and is so accurate that you can see the edges of the actual pixels, while all the folks who don't have Retina displays are just seeing them blurred together.

     

    -Noel

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 16, 2013 1:06 PM   in reply to adamleewermuthmavs

    adamleewermuthmavs wrote:

     

    The problem is that for the last 10 years that I have been using photoshop on a mac, the images always displayed bigger and sharper on the screen no matter if I am connected to a monitor or not. Now that I have upgraded to a mac with retina display the images open smaller than I am use to. I, like the others asking for help are only asking if there is a setting somewhere that allows us to set it up so the images appear like they did before.

     

    Lets break out the ruler - Top image is the same picture I used before, on my mac screen in inches at 100%. Clearly it is showing bigger than an inch. Bottom image is the same picture at 100% but on my monitor hooked up to the mac and is really over 3 1/2 inches. This is how it use to display on my mac, nice and big and sharp. I am guessing it is a retina display issue.

     

    So without more condescending answers that help no one, is there a way to have the images display on my mac like they do on my monitor - the way they did before I had a retina display?

    Plug in a regular monitor into the HDMI port, and use that.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 16, 2013 2:05 PM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    Thanks for the insight, since I just started designing yesterday you've been a great help! I'll go ahead and post the answer to our problem down below. Now to find a youtube tutorial on adding this mask layer thingy, or maybe it's layer mask? Hopefully the tutorial tells me.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 16, 2013 2:23 PM   in reply to pmlink360

    I do have to thank Noel for giving me a better search term for this problem. Never dealing with a retina display before I didn't know what to search for so I typed out the exact problem, which brought me here. But with Noel's "help" I searched "retina display problems with photoshop" and found this very helpful and non condescending answer from Julieanne Kost's blog http://blogs.adobe.com/jkost/2013/01/viewing-photoshop-cs6-in-low-reso lution-on-a-retina-display.html

     

    The solution is quit simply and a lenghty lesson on "how images and displays actually work" is not needed.

     

    Select the Photoshop application in the Finder and choose File > Get Info. If you have a Retina display, under General, there will be an option to “Open in Low Resolution” check that and when you reopen your image in photoshop it will appear like you are use to.

     

    The image on the left was opened in photoshop on the retina display as normal. The image on the right is opened with "Open in Low Resolution" checked.

     

    Screen-Shot.jpg

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Noel Carboni
    23,455 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 16, 2013 4:25 PM   in reply to adamleewermuthmavs

    Honestly I wish you the best, but turning on a "compatibility" setting to essentially erase all the advantages of having a high PPI display to me seems to me to be the wrong approach.

     

    At this point I'd really like to know how what you're showing in your screen grab is better (or looks better) than running in "high resolution" mode and just getting used to selecting 200% zoom to see the image larger.  I imagine the designers at Adobe would like to know as well, since they specifically added a [200%] button to cover this issue.

     

    -Noel

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 16, 2013 6:13 PM   in reply to adamleewermuthmavs

    What could possibly be more condescending than using that offensive label to characterize others?

     

    If I should ever lose the ability to laugh at myself and at my mistakes, I'll consider myself doomed.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Noel Carboni
    23,455 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 16, 2013 8:49 PM   in reply to station_two

    Adam honestly doesn't see that he's making a mistake.

     

    Perhaps for him continuity with the way things worked before is paramount, and all else secondary.  I don't understand how that can help him move forward, but to each his own.  Knowing Apple, there won't be a compatibility pixel-doubling setting forever...

     

    -Noel

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 18, 2013 10:28 PM   in reply to adamleewermuthmavs

    The image on the left was opened in photoshop on the retina display as normal. The image on the right is opened with "Open in Low Resolution" checked.

    That is the same image in both screenshots?

    Could you please post the image itself or a link to it?

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 19, 2013 7:13 AM   in reply to c.pfaffenbichler

    Could you please post the image itself or a link to it?

    Forget it, I noticed you downsampled the screenshot which makes it a lot less significant.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 22, 2013 3:09 AM   in reply to c.pfaffenbichler

    After all R&D I could not find a solutions for this! Luckily I also have Thunderbolt display, I am survived some how. If not it would be really hard to eork on macbook pro with 100% view in photoshot. I tried zooming in 200%, but I hate when images get pixelated.

     

    upgrade to Thunderbolt, till adobe can fix this.

     

    cheers

    Maheshwar Mathad

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 22, 2013 3:26 AM   in reply to maheshwar26
    till adobe can fix this.

     

    Fix what?

    Pixel images are made up of pixels and the display devices represent pixels, but »pixel« is not a measurement unit of length as such.

     

    For Photoshop to upsamle magnifications above 100% with another algorithm than »Nearest Neighbor« (or the like) would make pixel perfect working pretty difficult so it is hardly generally desirable, but according to adamleewermuthmavs the option exists.

    They posted a downscaled screenshot so it is not possible for me to judge how images are actually upsampled at »100%« when »Open in Low Resolution« is chosen, though.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 22, 2013 3:37 AM   in reply to c.pfaffenbichler

    I also saw on illustrator and the the screen is 100%! if ratina display is causing this, then illustrator also would have been affected. Or may be its vector based so not impacted?

     

    cheers

    Maheshwar Mathad

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 22, 2013 3:48 AM   in reply to maheshwar26
    I also saw on illustrator and the the screen is 100%! if ratina display is causing this, then illustrator also would have been affected.

     

    Basically: No.

    Is it news to you that vector and pixel based applications work differently?

     

    Quote from the reference:

    About monitor resolution

    Your monitor’s resolution is described in pixel dimensions. For example, if your monitor resolution and your photo’s pixel dimensions are the same

    size, the photo will fill the screen when viewed at 100%. How large an image appears on-screen depends on a combination of factors—the pixel

    dimensions of the image, the monitor size, and the monitor resolution setting. In Photoshop, you can change the image magnification on-screen,

    so you can easily work with images of any pixel dimensions.

    Photoshop’s View > 100% is not intended to display an image at a certain size in inches or cm (according to its resolution), but to represent one image pixel by one screen pixel.

    So how would the feature need fixing?

     

    Edit: Have you checked out View > Print Size?

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 22, 2013 4:03 AM   in reply to c.pfaffenbichler

    There is no difference in '100% view' and 'Print size' both shows same size!

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 22, 2013 4:06 AM   in reply to maheshwar26

    Have you set the correct »Screen Resolution« in Photoshop > Preferences > Units & Rulers?

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 22, 2013 4:13 AM   in reply to c.pfaffenbichler

    Maheshwar Mathad SS.jpg

     
    |
    Mark as:
1 2 3 ... 5 Previous Next
Actions

More Like This

  • Retrieving data ...

Bookmarked By (0)

Answers + Points = Status

  • 10 points awarded for Correct Answers
  • 5 points awarded for Helpful Answers
  • 10,000+ points
  • 1,001-10,000 points
  • 501-1,000 points
  • 5-500 points