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whitby rider
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Resolution seems a little low on big screen TV

Jul 5, 2013 1:53 PM

I shot some video at 1920x1080 (30 frames per sec). I used continuous lighting to light my subject. ISO was 640. The final results look really good. However, after burning to DVD using Encore to prepare the DVD, the movie looks a bit pixely. It does not appear noisy at all (because of the 640 iso), just a bit mid resolution. I have seen sharper, higher quality video on my big screen tv when I view a movie or TV. My big scrren TV is 50"

 

Is this normal or have I exported the movie improperly from Premiere to get this issue? The export settings I used from Premiere were: Format:Quicktime, Preset:HD1080i 29.97, H.264, 48khz

 

Thank you.

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 5, 2013 3:03 PM   in reply to whitby rider

    Just to make sure that we are addressing the same problem, are you saying that you shot HD, then output to an SD DVD-Video, and are judging its resolution/quality vs the HD original material, or something else? The more info, the better, please.

     

    Hunt

     
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    Jul 5, 2013 3:38 PM   in reply to whitby rider

    Comparison picture of video screen sizes http://forums.adobe.com/thread/1120039

     

    A DVD screen is a LOT smaller than a HiDef screen... so when you put a DVD screen on a HiDef TV, the "expanded" image will not be as good as a true HiDef file

     
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    Jul 5, 2013 3:53 PM   in reply to whitby rider

    Sorry, but if you use DVD for your Encore project, the encoder within Encore will automatically re-compress and downconvert your H.264 HD video content to MPEG-2 SD. You cannot override this at all. The only way to author an Encore project in HD would be to open a new Blu-ray project.

     

    By the way, you will need a third-party burning software to write to DVD since Encore itself will not allow you to burn HD material at all to DVD (HD content can only be written to BD-R/RE in Encore). Write to a Blu-ray folder, then use the third-party software for the final burn. You will also need a Blu-ray player that can read AVCHD discs in order to use HD burned to DVD.

     

    Here are the restrictions for HD files that are to be burned onto DVD:

     

    1) The total bitrate (including video, audio, motion menus and miscellaneous content) must not exceed 18 Mbps combined.

     

    2) Audio should be a separate file (unmuxed), and be exported as Dolby Digital (AC-3). Do not mux (interleave) video and audio together as a single file: This will force Encore to re-compress both video and audio.

     
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    Jul 5, 2013 6:31 PM   in reply to whitby rider

    If you wish to come very close to maintaining the resolution and quality of your HD footage, you can Burn to BD (Blu-ray Disc) from Encore. It still figures into the mix. That will show the client what you have done, in a very good light.

     

    This graphic, of the differences betwen some common Frame Sizes, might give you an idea of DVD-Video, which will be SD (Standard Def), vs HD (High Def), and then some larger frame sizes:

    Digital_video_resolutions_(VCD_to_4K)_svg (1).png

    Notice DVD vs the two most popular HD resolutions. That is what you are fighting right now.

     

    Good luck, and hope that helps.

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 5, 2013 6:51 PM   in reply to whitby rider

    To burn a BD (Blu-ray Disc), you DO need a BD burner, and BD blank media.

     

    As for the Mac "super drive," I am a 100% PC person, so cannot help.

     

    Now, with a short Duration Project (about 20 mins.), one CAN burn an HD Project to a DVD-Video disc, but will need to use a BD burner, and play that on a BD player, as it is really not a DVD-Video, but a hybrid, or sorts.

     

    Good luck, and maybe others can address "super drive."

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 5, 2013 6:59 PM   in reply to whitby rider

    This forum is blessed with a lot of Mac-folk, and they can be so very helpful.

     

    As it's into the July 4th holiday in the US, you might need to wait a bit, for them to come back to the forums, and help you out there.

     

    Also, most of Adobe USA is on a one-week holiday, so they will not be back into their offices, until July 8th.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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    Jul 5, 2013 11:53 PM   in reply to whitby rider

    When I make a DVD from HD material, I export my timeline using a High quality "lossleess" codec, e.g. the free download UT codec.  This produces a very large file, but avoids a lot of problems with quality in the necessary re-encoding.

     

    I then use AME to produce a DVD legal file for Encore.  I create my DVD, and then I play it on a player which has Up-scaling on my Hi-def TV.  Up-scaling players give much better results with DVDs than straight DVD players when you have a large screen TV.

     

    The cameras you use make it sound as though you may be coming from a still photograph background.  Well all the problems caused by lack of pixels and down-scaling you met there are present in video, but in spades!!!

     

    The frame for 1920x1080 HD video has around 2 megapixels, while the frame for PAL SD video has round 0.4 megapixels.  Think how many megapixels you would want in a still image to print at A4 size with adequate results, let alone a poster sized 40 inch sheet of paper.  NTSC video has even fewer pixels than PAL!

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 6, 2013 2:58 AM   in reply to Alan Craven

    When I make a DVD from HD material, I export my timeline using a High quality "lossleess" codec, e.g. the free download UT codec.  This produces a very large file, but avoids a lot of problems with quality in the necessary re-encoding.

    Do you scale it down or leave it 1920x1080.

     
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    Jul 6, 2013 3:33 AM   in reply to Ann Bens

    Ann Bens wrote:

     

    When I make a DVD from HD material, I export my timeline using a High quality "lossleess" codec, e.g. the free download UT codec.  This produces a very large file, but avoids a lot of problems with quality in the necessary re-encoding.

    Do you scale it down or leave it 1920x1080.

    Check my second paragraph!

     

    I find that I can get even higher quality by using Vdub, with the Lanczos filter to do the actual down-scaling of the "lossless" export, but that seemed over-kill in the present thread.

     
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    Jul 6, 2013 5:11 AM   in reply to Alan Craven

    It does not say when you are scaling down when making the avi or the mpeg-2dvd.

    Premiere also uses lanczos.

     
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    Jul 6, 2013 7:49 PM   in reply to whitby rider

    That is most likely because you have an upscaling DVD player

     

    Plus, yes, a movie studio will use encoding software that costs $20K or more

     
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    Jul 7, 2013 10:08 AM   in reply to John T Smith

    And they compress almost frame by frame to get the best compression possible.

     

    Not something the rest of us can really match.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 7, 2013 2:30 PM   in reply to whitby rider

    how come a DVD movie looks hi-def on my 50" screen?

     

    It doesn't.  Watch the same movie on Blu-ray and you'll see the difference.

     
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    Jul 7, 2013 2:41 PM   in reply to whitby rider

    Well, given the difference in resources and source material, this is not surprising.

     
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