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Monkey1895
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number of licenses / versions when ordering an update to premiere elements 11?

Jul 11, 2013 11:25 PM

Tags: #premiere_elements_licenses

Hi,

at the moment I have adobe premiere elements 9 on one computer and I consider ordering premiere elements 11 as an update.

Could someone please indicate, how many licenses or versions I could receive, or in other words: on how many computers or notebooks can I install premiere elements 11 when ordering the one update?

Thany you for your help!

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 12, 2013 5:26 AM   in reply to Monkey1895

    You are allowed two installations of the program on two separate computers -- provided both computers are owned by you.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 12, 2013 7:56 AM   in reply to Steve Grisetti

    Is it still true that you may only USE one program at a time, even after installing on two computers?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 12, 2013 8:09 AM   in reply to John T Smith

    I've had both open at the same time.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 12, 2013 8:24 AM   in reply to Monkey1895

    Monkey1895

     

    Are you planning on leaving Premiere Elements 9.0/9.0.1 installed on the computer on which you plan to install Premiere Elements 11? If so, that counts as one installation for each of those programs. The focus is copies of the same purchased serial number on no more than 2 of your computers.

     

    You can leave Premiere Elements 9.0/9.0.1 installed on the same computer, as you check out Premiere Elements 11 on that computer. If you have no more plans for version 9.0/9.0.1 on this computer, you should Deactivate via an opened project's Help Menu/Deactivate and then uninstall via the usual Control Panel route. This way, you will not have 9.0/9.0.1 with its given serial number counted as 1 install contributing to the no more than 2 computers with that specific serial number. If you are thinking about using 9.0/9.0.1 with that serial number again on this computer at another date, you can leave it Deactivated without the need to uninstall it. It will become activated when you open it again at that later date if the "count is no more than 2".

     

    I have seen where Adobe advises use one program at a time. It has been my impresson that is a "for best results" type of comment rather than a dictate and is dependant upon computer resources. I have tried otherwise in my specific computer environment and find that I can run 2 versions at the same time, but I do not. I have no need to.

     

    Please do not hesitate to ask if you need clarification on anything that I have written.

     

    Thanks.

     

    ATR

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 12, 2013 8:56 AM   in reply to A.T. Romano

    A.T. Romano wrote:

     

    Monkey1895

     

    Are you planning on leaving Premiere Elements 9.0/9.0.1 installed on the computer on which you plan to install Premiere Elements 11? If so, that counts as one installation for each of those programs. The focus is copies of the same purchased serial number on no more than 2 of your computers.

     

    You can leave Premiere Elements 9.0/9.0.1 installed on the same computer, as you check out Premiere Elements 11 on that computer. If you have no more plans for version 9.0/9.0.1 on this computer, you should Deactivate via an opened project's Help Menu/Deactivate and then uninstall via the usual Control Panel route. This way, you will not have 9.0/9.0.1 with its given serial number counted as 1 install contributing to the no more than 2 computers with that specific serial number. If you are thinking about using 9.0/9.0.1 with that serial number again on this computer at another date, you can leave it Deactivated without the need to uninstall it. It will become activated when you open it again at that later date if the "count is no more than 2".

     

    I have seen where Adobe advises use one program at a time. It has been my impresson that is a "for best results" type of comment rather than a dictate and is dependant upon computer resources. I have tried otherwise in my specific computer environment and find that I can run 2 versions at the same time, but I do not. I have no need to.

     

    Please do not hesitate to ask if you need clarification on anything that I have written.

     

    Thanks.

     

    ATR

    Are you sure of that advice?  Last I checked, there was no such thing as an update to Elements products.  If there is one I missed it each year for the past three.  If there is one, the savings would be so insignificant as to not matter.

     

    When you buy a new Elements product, you get a new serial number and it qualifies for 2 new installs.  It does not count against the old license.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 12, 2013 8:49 AM   in reply to John T Smith

    John,

     

    I have not noted a change in the EULA for Adobe programs (prior to the CC licensing, which I have not looked at, at all), but historically (an important word here), Adobe's statement was that one was allowed to have two installations, but those could not be run at the same time. This was true for any program in any of the Suites - the Suites, say Adobe Production Premium, counted as one instance, so that one was not allowed to have, say Photoshop (from that suite) running on one machine, while PrPro (from that suite) was running on the other machine.

     

    That was not a limitation of the programs, per se, but was one of legality. I accidentaly had PrPro going on two computers, forgetting that it was open on the one downstairs, while I was upstairs. They both ran fine, and there was no "OPEN UP, this is Adobe!" knock on the door. Still, when I realized my mistake, I just shut one copy down. It took Todd Kopriva (Adobe Product Manager) several days, communicating with Adobe Legal, to get the definitive word on the suites. I usually had PS open on one machine, while PrPro would be churning away on the other. We found out that this was not allowed by the EUAL, as Adobe viewed the suite, and all programs in it, as one license, regardless of separate S/N's. In my case, I had three separate licenses for several programs, and licenses for two different suites, so if Adobe had wanted to drag me to court, I could probably have "beaten the rap." Still, my intention has always been to honor my licensing and the EULA's a correctly, as I could.

     

    With PrE, I am not sure how things might differ. First, the "upgrade" in PrE is really just a "reduced price," as the program is complete on the media, or download, and I have never heard of anyone needed a previous S/N to install, or run PrE. However, as things ARE changing at Adobe, I have to admit that even with PrE, things could be different. Also, the Elements programs differ from their "big brothers" in lots of ways, like having both a PC version AND a Mac version, on the same installation discs. With PrPro, one needed separate licenses to get a PC, and a Mac version of the program - until the CC licensing crossed the platform barrier.

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 12, 2013 10:11 AM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    Bill, you make a good point. Legally you can't run both installations of the same program at the same time because the software has just one owner -- and how can one owner be running it on two computers at the same time?

     

    But sometimes, for research purposes, I do. For instance, when I'm comparing the Windows version of Premiere Elements with the Mac.

     

    Just thought you'd like to know.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 12, 2013 11:23 AM   in reply to Steve Grisetti

    Yes. I have inadvertently run two copies of some of the programs, and nothing shut down, blew up, or caused Adobe to come yell at me. It can be done, but it's just outside of the EULA. When I was informed of the "suites," and how Adobe Legal viewed those, and their components, I altered some of my workflow, and then installed copies of certain programs, for which I had separate licenses, just to circumvent any legal issues. That treatment of the "suites" came as a surprise to me, and did take Adobe Legal some days, to get back with an answer - obviously, they were almost as much in the dark, as Todd Kopriva, and I were.

     

    In most of my cases, I would have one computer Exporting out of PrPro, while I was on another one, using Photoshop to create my Menus for Encore. If those two programs were from the same suite, then that was a no-no, so I changed things up a bit.

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 12, 2013 11:52 AM   in reply to whsprague

    whsprague

     

    You asked

    Are you sure of that advice?  Last I checked, there was no such thing as an update to Elements products.  If there is one I missed it each year for the past three.  If there is one, the savings would be so insignificant as to not matter.

     

    When you buy a new Elements product, you get a new serial number and it qualifies for 2 new installs.  It does not count against the old license.

    Yes, I am sure of what I wrote and, in the last paragraph, have tried to make distinctions with modififiers such as "impression". When the user has 9.0/9.0.1 already on the computer and he/she is installing version 11, a pop should appear acknowledging the existance of other versions and states the choice to leave the other versions as is, but "advises" just use one at a time. I am not talking about Premiere Elements 11 one serial number and Premiere Elements 11 with another serial number on the same computer. That was never part of the exchange of information.

     

    1. I have no idea to what you are referring when you mention "there was no such thing as an update to Elements products". I never once mentioned "update" in what I wrote. So, where is that question coming from in the context of what I wrote?  Further, there have been updates, important ones at that, for Premiere Elements 8.0 there is 8.0.1 and for Premiere Elements 9.0 there is 9.0.1. And, I believe one for version 3 as well. Upgrades are a different matter which had meaning for the Photoshop and Premiere Pro people in the past. Upgrade is a pricing only term for Premiere Elements versions which are standalone products.

     

    2. And, as for your comment about new serial number and it qualifies for 2 new installs, that is consistent with what I wrote.

     

    3. Unless Hunt or SG can point to the exact portion of the Adobe License Agreement for Premiere Elements with regard to what Adobe means for "use of program at a time in the same computer" during the installation of a new version, I will try to find that information specific to Premiere Elements.

     

    ATR

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 12, 2013 11:58 AM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    Hunt

     

    When you wrote

    I have inadvertently run two copies of some of the programs

    could you clarify as to:

     

    a. is one or two computers involved in your example?

    and

    b. Premiere Pro (or other) same version with same serial number on one and the same computer

    or

    c. Premiere Pro (or other) two different serial numbers on one and the same computer

    or

    d. None of the variations above

     

    ATR

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 12, 2013 12:12 PM   in reply to A.T. Romano

    A - Two computers

    B - In one case, PrPro w/ same S/N on laptop and workstation. In another, Photoshop w/ same S/N on laptop and workstation.

    C - Now, Photoshop with separate S/N's, on laptop and workstation

     

    I only have PrE on a laptop, so only have one installation.

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 12, 2013 12:39 PM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    Hunt,

     

    The only time that I have ever seen the "use one program at a time" in regard to Premiere Elements is when I have been installing a new version with a new serial number on a computer that already has one or more versions of Premiere Elements, each with its own serial number. And, I always opt to keep old and new versions installed on that one computer.

     

    If I install one of computer 1's Premiere Elements/purchased serial number on a second computer with no prior installs of Premiere Elements (any version), I do not get a "use one program at a time" message. Adobe does not appear to be acknowleding the existence of the copy on the first computer.

     

    The next and only time that Adobe recognizes  that Premiere Elements serial number is if I go to install that serial number on a third computer.

     

    So, until I find where in the Premiere Elements Adobe Licensing Agreement Adobe defines its "use one program at a time" and in what context, my comments and impression will continue to be as stated previously.

     

    ATR

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 12, 2013 12:48 PM   in reply to A.T. Romano

    Maybe this section of the Premiere Elements 11 EULA will be helpful:

     

    2.1.3 Portable or Home Computer Use. Subject to the restrictions set forth in Section 2.1.4, the

    primary user of the Computer on which the Software is installed under Section 2.1 (“Primary User”)

    may install a second copy of the Software for his or her exclusive use on either a portable Computer

    or a Computer located at his or her home, provided that the Software on the portable or home

    Computer is not used at the same time as the Software on the primary Computer.

     

    Excerpted from the PrE 11 EULA, found here: http://www.adobe.com/products/eulas/

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 12, 2013 1:19 PM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    Hunt

     

    Thanks.

     

    Are you interpreting that to mean that, according to the Adobe Licensing Agreement, the user would have to buy Premiere Elements 11 with a given serial number for one computer and Premiere Elements with a different serial number in order to be able for each to be opened and in use on its computer?

     

    If that is the case, then what I have written previously in this thread is in step with the Adobe Licensing Agreement since I was referring to installing Premiere Elements 11 on a computer that already has Premiere Elements 9.0/9.0.1 and the pop up "use one program at a time". Each of those has its own purchased serial number. A second computer is not involved.

     

    Consequently, all this supports my "impression" that the "use one program at a time"  in the context that I presented it

    I have seen where Adobe advises use one program at a time. It has been my impresson that is a "for best results" type of comment rather than a dictate and is dependant upon computer resources. I have tried otherwise in my specific computer environment and find that I can run 2 versions at the same time, but I do not. I have no need to.

    presents no conflict with the Adobe Licensing Agreement.

     

    ATR

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 12, 2013 1:33 PM   in reply to A.T. Romano

    Are you interpreting that to mean that, according to the Adobe Licensing Agreement, the user would have to buy Premiere Elements 11 with a given serial number for one computer and Premiere Elements with a different serial number in order to be able for each to be opened and in use on its computer?

    To be running at the same time? Then yes.

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 12, 2013 1:39 PM   in reply to A.T. Romano

    Yes, if one has multiple licenses, then that limitation should not apply, so long as each program, being used simultaneously, is on a different license.

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 12, 2013 1:41 PM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    Hunt

     

    Thanks. Glad that is put to rest.

     

    ATR

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 12, 2013 1:54 PM   in reply to A.T. Romano

    As in all things, what is ethical, unethical, right, wrong, fair, unfair, works, does not work and legal or illegal don't line up well.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 12, 2013 3:30 PM   in reply to whsprague

    Yes Bill, sometimes the lines can get blurred.

     

    I have always tried to go with what I read and understand to be legal, and what I thought to be ethical.

     

    However, there can be times, when all legalities are not met - as was the case in my use of the suites. I thought that I had a good understanding of the EULA there, but with some research, found out that I did not. Even the Product Manager did not initially know the "rules."

     

    As for the ethical aspects, with regards to Adobe EULA's, though I had found out that I COULD run multiple copies of some programs, against the EULA, when I was given the ruling on the suites, I rethought my workflow, and found both legal and ethical ways to get done, what needed to be done, and within the articles of the EULA's. Just the way that I am.

     

    Hunt

     
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