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Removing a small  guitar part from an old studio recording

Jul 20, 2013 11:56 AM

Hi Guys

 

Not sure if this is possible but I got an old  studio recording I done a few years ago and there's a  small  guitar part (2 measures) thats wrong and driving me nuts.... I'd love to be able to either erase it totally or even just bring down the volume  on that one part.....unfor don't have the original this was just one of the takes from the session  lost the original and I need it for an upcoming project. I'm using Audition CS6 in Win7 Ultimate  32Bbit

 

                                                     Appreciate any help

                                                     

                                                      Barry

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 20, 2013 12:16 PM   in reply to finbar69

    Maybe... if you had new Audition CC with sound remover tool

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 20, 2013 10:05 PM   in reply to finbar69

    there is a free trial:)

     
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  • SteveG(AudioMasters)
    5,602 posts
    Oct 26, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 21, 2013 4:18 AM   in reply to finbar69

    There are a couple of things you can try, and you don't need the CC version to try them. Your best bet for at least reducing one part over a short period is to identify it, and its harmonics, in the Frequency Analysis window and simply paint them out with the spot brush. Also, if the part is panned specifically to one place in the stereo, you can use the center channel extractor to reduce it, if you steer the extraction point to where the sound is - it doesn't just work in the centre!

     
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  • SteveG(AudioMasters)
    5,602 posts
    Oct 26, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 21, 2013 7:21 AM   in reply to finbar69

    At least you can console yourself that you wouldn't get at it with the sound removal tool either then - you need to be able to identify it in a similar way to use it. And it's not exactly ideal for doing the job; it's meant to be able to remove other instances of a cleanly identified sound, and this doesn't sound as though it's anything like that.

     
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  • SteveG(AudioMasters)
    5,602 posts
    Oct 26, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 21, 2013 9:15 AM   in reply to finbar69

    finbar69 wrote:

    ... can identify it more in the Spectral Pitch as opposed to the Spectral Frequency

     

    Er, they are the same thing! It's the screen under the waveform you need to be looking at, and you can expand the display vertically so that it's displaying just the bits you need, to make it easier. You have to bear in mind that the guitar notes won't just have fundamental frequencies, but a load of harmonics too, and to get rid of all of them, you have to identify at least all of the strongest ones - and that whole process isn't that easy to do. In fact, it can be very time-consuming, even if you get good at it.

     
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