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100% view is not 100% size?

Aug 23, 2013 12:27 AM

When I set view to 100%, the size of my drawingboard appears on the screen at approx. 70% of the actual size. Why is that, and how to change it?

Can you scale the size of an illustation before saving?

 
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 23, 2013 1:01 AM   in reply to Imumbo

    Imumbo,

     

    View = 100% corresponds to 72PPI. A normal screen resolution is somewhat higher, depending on the monitor and its settings.

     

    Therefore 100% is smaller than actual size. You may determine which % corresponds to actual size and use that.

     

    You can scale up or down before saving (you may do it to a copy), but depending on the target format you may be able to adjust the size in connexion with saving/exporting.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 23, 2013 1:53 AM   in reply to Imumbo

    In addition to what Jacob says, you can adjust the zoom % by overwriting the figure at the extreme bottom left of your Illustrator window. Once you have found actual size, make a note of the figure and you can re-enter it at any time.

     

    Hi Jacob.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 23, 2013 3:47 AM   in reply to Imumbo

    Imumbo,

     

    Is that strange, or what?

     

    That is strange. Probably, Worst is using a default resolution of 96PPI (someone with it may verify), as compared to the 72PPI in Illy; 148/110 ~ 96/72.

     

    Obviously, the normal sense of the term screen resolution is the pixel x pixel size that the monitor is set to; that variable resolution corresponds to a variable resolution in PPI, which is the crucial one here.

     

    There is no special scaling button. You may (create a copy of the artwork and) select everything and scale up, Object>Transform>Scale or similar, then adapt the Artboard or the Crop Area/Marks (depending on version) and Export, then scale down again (unless you work on a copy).

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 23, 2013 5:08 AM   in reply to Imumbo

    Imumbo wrote:

     

    Sorry, but I can´t find any button to scale up before saving. What follows here may be beside the actual topic, but I´d like to try an exercise someone recommended, that should produce better quality EMF. He suggested saving the file 10 times bigger before exporting to EMF. Then insert the EMF into PowerPoint, and there take it down again to original size and save it. I wanted to try that exercise because I have this problem:

    I am doing a simple illustration in black/white, a line drawing that has very small texts (5,5pt). The EMF has to be inserted into a Word-document and finally converted to PDF. (I found this procedure simply the best, when I did some music score examples, where the staff-lines would only be totally sharp when using this method.) What I find with the texts is that already when exporting to EMF, the spacing changes just enough to give a very different result when reaching the PDF.

     

    Back to scaling - I don´t see any possibility to save an illustration 10 times bigger?

    The 10x-to-EMF thing is pretty much nonsense, IMO, but if you want to try it, select all, then double-click the Scale tool and enter 1000% in the Uniform field at the top of the Scale dialog.

     

    Here's something else to try: convert your text to outlines, then select all and Edit > Copy. Switch to your MS Office app, (Word or Powerpoint...doesn't matter), and Edit > Paste Special > Enhanced Metafile. I find this often results in a much "truer" graphic in MS Office than any Illustrator export function.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 23, 2013 5:50 AM   in reply to Imumbo

    When I set view to 100%, the size of my drawingboard appears on the screen at approx. 70% of the actual size....My LCD screen has 1600 by 900...148% gives me a 1:1 view in Illustrator…When I use WORD, it´s 110% that gives a 1:1 picture. Is that strange, or what?

    And yet I'll bet that when you're presenting in the conference room, and still have the zoom set to 100%, the projector displays at much larger than actual size. You wouldn't consider that strange, would you?

     

    100% zoom does not mean "actual size" except in the rough sense of angle of view. (Relates to how far from your face the display is meant to be viewed).

     

    72 PPI at 100% zoom is the Mac OS default. 96 PPI at 100% zoom is the Windows default. The OS default may or may not be abided by the applications. For example, on Windows, Illustrator is 72 PPI at 100% while Acrobat is 96 PPI at 100%.

     

    None of that has any correspondence to actual physical size in real-world units of measure except in the (increasingly rare) special cases in which the physical dot pitch of the monitor hardware happens to match that of the software. Saying your monitor displays 1600 x 900 pixels doesn't mean anything in this regard because you haven't stated anything about what size those monitor pixels are. My Microsoft Surface Pro tablet's monitor resolution is 1920 x 1080; the same as several of my desktop monitors, which of course are much larger. My LCD TV is also 1920 x 1080, and yet is larger still. The Surface Pro monitor has a pixel count of 208 pixels per inch, so viewing an Illustrator or Word or Acrobat or Corel Draw page at 100% zoom is much smaller than your 70%. Many other handheld devices have even higher PPI.

     

    JET

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 23, 2013 9:54 AM   in reply to Imumbo

    With vector graphics you can scale as much as you like, and the maximum output quality of your print device will be used.

     

    Illustrator has some features that are not vector. To be brief they are the ones under effects >> photohsop effects, and of course if you place a bitmapped image that will not be vector.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 23, 2013 11:05 AM   in reply to Imumbo

    Drawing in the actual dimensions allows you to better judge stuff like font sizes or stroke widths. When drawing in scale, you tend to forget the scaling and assign stroke widths that might not print well or font sizes too big or too small.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 23, 2013 2:23 PM   in reply to Imumbo

    Imumbo,

     

    In addition to what Mike and Monika said:

     

    There are a few of the Stylize Effects (first group) that are also raster effects; you can set the Effect>Document Raster Effect Settings to the needed resolution depending on possible scaling.

     

    It may help you assess things if you make prints of pages/spreads, so it would be convenient to use a scale enabling that; depending on the final book size it could be 1:1 if you can print a spread like that as in an A5 book, or it could be A5:A4 (0.707:1 or 1:1.414) for an A4 book, or similar.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 24, 2013 6:04 AM   in reply to Imumbo

    Someone's recommendation about scaling to 1000% for EMF export is pretty silly. These are very easy things to test. Why don't you just try it?

     

    1. Draw something consisting of some simple vector paths in Illustrator. For example, just convert a few characters from a dingbat font to paths.
    2. Export to EMF.
    3. Launch an Office application and Insert the EMF.
    4. Zoom in, look it over. Is it accurate enough for you?

     

     

    Depending on the artwork involved, it can sometimes help to scale the artwork to 200% or so, because the conversion to EMF is not always as accurate, and the upscaling/downscaling can disgise the unwanted ugly detail. In my experience, this is more a problem with WMF than EMF. These days you should be using EMF.

    Is it true that I´ll get the best results with illustrations if I set them up in Illustrator in the dimensions they will have in the end product, in this case a book?

    Generally, and within practical limits, it just makes practical sense to set your document up at actual size. That avoids scaling having to be done at output. But...

     

    When drawing in scale, you tend to forget the scaling and assign stroke widths that might not print well or font sizes too big or too small.

     

    Yes! That´s exactly what I meant to say, and in fact what made me wonder about this subject of scaling in the first place. I´m extremely sensitive to forms and dimensions...

    This is nonsense. While setting up your drawing at 100% scale makes sense for a book, it certainly wouldn't make much sense for a billboard, would it?

     

    ...that´s why I like to see my things "as they are".

    Really? You want to draw your next trade show display at 100% scale? And view it at 100% scale while you draw it? You're gonna need a mighty big monitor for that. Forget your monitor. You'd better get out that projector I mentioned earlier, take it to the local abandoned drive-in theater, and work only at night.

     

    You're talking about two entirely different things: The scale at which you set up your document and the zoom at which you draw.

     

    While drawing, you continually zoom way in and zoom way out. The clutch assembly I'm drawing is destined for a book. The assembly consists of many parts. While drawing each part, I generally zoom in until that part pretty much fills the screen. In fact you pretty much have to in Illustrator in order for snaps to be reliable.

     

    As for accidently using an inappropriate text size (?!), you of course do not set up your document at actual scale of a billboard design. Nor do you work zoomed into it to view it at actual size while you draw. You zoom out to view it as a whole "page" and that's how you judge the layout and size of text, lines, etc., etc.

     

    In fact, it's much the same thing as drawing/designing for a page. Again, it's all about angle of view; how much of your field of vision is occupied. That's why you can work with reasonable comfort on your laptop monitor's pixels which are smaller than those of your desktop monitor; you're closer to your laptop monitor than you are to your desktop monitor. In use, they are both occupying about the same amount of your field of vision.

     

    You can read a web page on your cell phone for the same reason. It may use 96 of its tee-niney pixels to render an "inch" and that "inch" will surely be much smaller than the same "inch" of the same web page when rendered with 96 of the much larger pixels of your desktop monitor. But you can still read both equally well, because you're holding your cell phone just a few inches from your face so that its "inch" occupies about the same angular portion of your field of view as does your desktop monitor when sitting at your desk--just as the 1-foot "inch" on the billboard does when you're driving down the freeway.

     

    Of course, the real problem in this regard with Illustrator is it ridiculous absense of user-defined drawing scales, standard-fare taken for granted in every decent drawing program on the planet. What utter nonsense that an ostensibly "serious" drawing program can't allow the user to set up a drawing to scale in order to design a billboard or tradeshow booth, your customer's sign--let alone a housing subdivision, a map, a garden plan, a car graphic, a set of plans for your backyard shed...using true measure values.

     

    AI-only users have been resorting to archaic workarounds for such things since its very beginning. But it has nothing to do with using 72 versus 96 pixels to render an inch of measure at 100% zoom or with whether 100% zoom is actual size.

     

    JET

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 24, 2013 1:41 PM   in reply to Imumbo

    Imumbo wrote:

     

    ...I´d like to try an exercise someone recommended, that should produce better quality EMF. He suggested saving the file 10 times bigger before exporting to EMF. Then insert the EMF into PowerPoint, and there take it down again to original size and save it...

    This advice doesn't sound good to me

     

    Instead try this, in Power Point as well as in Word, go to the Insert tab > Text section, and choose Ojbect. You will have two options:

     

    option 1: Create New
    If you choose Illustrator, Word will open a new document window in Illustrator and you can paste or create the artwork there. When you save it will appear in PowerPoint or Word. The Illustrator file will be attached internally in the PowerPoint or Word files and will be used if you right click on the inserted object and choose Edit. Then if you scale it in Illustrator and save, the scale will update in PowerPoint and Word. But if you instead scale the inserted object in PowerPoint or Word a rasterized image of the initially inserted object will be used which will pixelate.

     

    option 2: Create From File lets you insert from an existing file and also gives you the option for linking the file instead of being attached as part of the word document. It functions the same as in option 1.

     

    Hope this helps

     
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