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flyash555
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Blurry photos - Premiere Elements 11

Sep 1, 2013 4:34 PM

(System) Windows 8 64 bit, Core i5 4670 CPU @ 3.40GHz, 8 GB DDR ram, GeForce GTX 650 - Nvidia/MSI - GeForce 320.49 Driver.

 

Hello I recently purchased Premiere Elements 11 and Photoshop Elements 11.  My first project was a success which included video and photos of my camping trip.  I burned that project to DVD.  My second project was created through PSE which was a slideshow from photos downloaded from Facebook (small images).  I burned that project to DVD.  My thrid project was another slideshow using photos from my camera.  I burned this project to DVD.  Unfortunately the pictures came out really blurry.

 

After reading the forums here I resized my photos to 1000x750 pixels however, my photos still came out blurry. 

 

After hours of troubleshooting, I decided to try to re-create my first successful movie which had still photos that were not blurry.  I used the same pictures and this time my pictures came out blurry.  Is there a setting I changed for this to happen?  The photo size from my 1st project is 4608x3456 pixels 7.73 MB.

 

I'm new to editing therefore I apologize in advance if I left out some critical information.

 

Thanks,

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 1, 2013 4:35 PM   in reply to flyash555

    Please see this article from the FAQs to the right of this forum.l

    http://forums.adobe.com/thread/1187937?tstart=0

     
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    Sep 1, 2013 5:37 PM   in reply to flyash555

    Please see the link in my first post.

     
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    Sep 2, 2013 7:37 PM   in reply to Steve Grisetti

    the two pics i use for the menus look very pixelated.

     
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    Sep 3, 2013 5:22 AM   in reply to pizzakid13

    Please see the link in my first post.

     
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    Sep 3, 2013 10:16 AM   in reply to Steve Grisetti

    i read that 1st.

     

    the pictures in the timeline look fine. the menu pics look bad.

     
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    Sep 3, 2013 10:40 AM   in reply to pizzakid13

    It looks bad when? On your finished DVD, when you play it on your TV?

     

    Note that when you Preview a menu in Premiere Elements, it is for navigation purposes only. It is not an indication of what your final DVD and menu will look like.

     
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    Sep 3, 2013 10:48 AM   in reply to pizzakid13

    pizzakid13

     

    Where do the menu pictures look bad...in the Movie Menu section Preview of the disc menu or in the playback of the final DVD-VIDEO on DVD disc? Is the problem with menu picture inserts or the whole menu (main and scene)?

     

    In Premiere Elements 11 Windows, my previews of disc menus are not the greatest but they look great in the final DVD-VIDEO on DVD disc. Major contribution of the Preview seems to be testing for possible TV remote problems. Even that is not always a 100% indicator for that. If the menus of the final product look bad, do you get the same with Blu-ray disc format on Blu-ray and AVCHD on DVD disc?

     

    By the way, are you also flyash555 or did you just tack on to this thread because you believed you had a common issue?

     

    ATR

     

    Add On...I did not see SG's reply to you until after I had posted this message to you.

     
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    Sep 3, 2013 1:24 PM   in reply to flyash555

    flyash555

     

    Your post 9 was marked "in reply to A.T. Romano". Were you really replying to Steve Grisetti and his link

    http://forums.adobe.com/thread/1187937?tstart=0

    that appeared as part of his first message to you?

     

    When you wrote

    I read your article 3 times and other FAQ's about my issue

    were you referring to anything that I have written on the subject? If so, please indicate.

     

    When you and Steve Grisetti have finished your exchange of information on this matter, I will comment from my perspective if necessary.

     

    Thanks.

     

    ATR

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 3, 2013 3:15 PM   in reply to flyash555

    1. If I wanted to create a slideshow, I should not create them on DVD's (for TV) since the picture quality is subpar.  Or I should use another type of software named something like "Pro Show Gold" which was mentioned in another post.

     

    2.  Do not use still photos when you create a video to be burned on a DVD to be played on TV.  They will look subpar.

     

    Is this correct?

     

    It depends. Where do you plan to display or share your finished video? On TV? On a computer? Online? On DVD? On a BluRay disc player?

     

    Each medium has its strengths and limitations, so you need to first decide how you want your audience to view your finished piece and then build the best project and output for that medium.

     
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    Sep 3, 2013 5:09 PM   in reply to flyash555

    My pics look bad in the preview disc menu. I will burn it and get back to

    you.

     
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    Sep 3, 2013 5:27 PM   in reply to pizzakid13

    DVDs are 720x480 pixels. So, if you plan to put your photos on a DVD, that's all the more detailed they're going to get -- as I discussed in the article I linked you to in my first post.

     

    And they're going to look blurry when you show them full-screen on your computer because your computer monitor is likely four or more times that resolution.

     
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    Sep 4, 2013 5:14 AM   in reply to flyash555

    I've written books on working with Premiere Elements as well as Premiere Elements and Phototshop Elements together. They are easy, step-by-step guides are have gotten great reviews on Amazon.

    http://muvipix.com/pe11.php

     

    I've also created a free 8 part Basic Training tutorial series for Premiere Elements support site Muvipix.com.

    http://forums.adobe.com/thread/537685?tstart=0

     
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    Sep 4, 2013 8:57 AM   in reply to Steve Grisetti

    I would like to give a big +1 for both Steve's books, and also for his Learning Series, especially Basic Training.

     

    Though I have been using Premiere (and Photoshop - for two decades), I always pick up his books, when published, as I know that I will learn something very useful.

     

    He also has a Cool Tips & Tricks book for PrE, that is a great followup, to the more basic ones. Nice addition to any editor's library.

     

    Good luck and happy editing,

     

    Hunt

     
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    Sep 4, 2013 10:20 AM   in reply to Steve Grisetti

    yes, burn to DVD and watch on Plasma. they are pixelated in the menu project. cant remember if they are in the disc preview. i'll check tonight.

     
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    Sep 4, 2013 1:00 PM   in reply to flyash555

    me?

     
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    Sep 4, 2013 8:11 PM   in reply to flyash555

    well, i burned the DVD and it there is a noticeable difference between the movies i did with PE2 and 11. with that older software, i had to convert the HD video with "convertxtodvd" since PE2 had no HD capability. i never noticed any downgrade in video quality.

     

    so correct me if i'm wrong here. with these HD capable programs like PE11, photos will look grainy or blurry because of the quality? why would there be a difference in photo quality if you're burning to DVD format anyway?

     

    also, the program crashed while trying to change the menu template. is there any way i can just use my pic by itself for the menu/scenes page? the templates provided all have a border of some kind. i like my pics to fill the screen. with just the title, play and scenes button.

     
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    Sep 5, 2013 5:14 AM   in reply to pizzakid13

    Unless someone else can help you, I think you'll just have to do some experimenting on your own. I've done all I can to explain video resolution.

     
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    Sep 5, 2013 6:11 AM   in reply to Steve Grisetti

    Hi Flyash and Pizzakid!

     

    I am a newbe to this whole world of Premiere Elements and Photoshop Elements (this is my third version on my third computer).  I would like to add a comment if I may.  I have never been more amazed at what wonderful programs these are.  I also am very appreciate of all the folks on this site that try to help others and make their Adobe experence more satisifing.  For myself, what has worked best if to practice everyday on some aspect of these programs, my goal is to allways learn a new skill or a new understanding of the world of photgraphy and vedio production.  One year into this learning test and I can say that I have moved forward but, I have such a long way to go!  Premiere Photoshop for me is about 4 times more complicated than Prmiere Elements.  The focus for me needs to be on perfecting my skill and knowlege of Photoshop first before I can expect better results in Elements.  What a joy you will find is that the two have the same Organizer!!  The other dificulty is that this skill is really a moving target, it is allways moving forward.  If you dont catch up with what is going on in the world of photography/video you get further behind!  So, I would recomend slowing down and putting together a new plan to really learn these programs.  If you are asking what books and what videos are the best, I would give you two responces, I find Steves the best but I would say all books and all videos help in some small way. 

     

    I challange you all to learn something new today and then tomorrow, make it, test it, make mistakes and fix mistakes.

     

    That is the only way you can understand when you have a problem.

     

    We are all in Cyber Space, the same as Outer Space, mission control can call and talk to you but you have to fix the problem.

     

    Moonpie

     
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    Sep 5, 2013 7:28 AM   in reply to moonpie001

    Moonpie,

     

    Glad that you are enjoying the journey. For me too, that is part of the whole process. Yes, handing off a successful DVD, or BD, to a client, who loves the work, is rewarding, but continuing to learn, in the process is a big payoff too - at least for some of us.

     

    I started way back when video was relegated to the studio only, with either a direct feed to the studio's switcher, or to a 2" tape deck. Back then, the video could only be edited by making a 45 degree diagonal cut with a razor blade, and then applying tape to splice that back together. I was working in film, as the quality and the look were so much better, and my cameras could easily leave the studio. Still, I was limited to one Audio track, to a Butt-Cut, a Fade to Black (that name changed to Dip-to-Black for digital Video), or a Cross-Dissolve (we called that a "Lap-Dissolve"). To see any of those, one had to have the two reels of film "printed" in the lab, and took at least a day - a day, before we could see if we had done well. Our editing rooms were filled with "laundry carts," or "bins," with 100's of yards of little film clips actually clipped to a rack over the bins.

     

    I did not get back to video, until it had gone digital. Oh my, how things had changed! Even with the rudimentary software of the day, it was easy to see the technical and creative power, and that power was intoxicating.

     

    As I had a cine background, plus many years as an advertising photographer, the last decade spent with Photoshop, it was easy for me to define a workflow for my video editing.

     

    I was shooting only SD (Standard Definition) miniDV tape-based material, so it was easy to learn what Project Preset I should be using - NTSC DV, in either Standard 4:3, or Widescreen 16:9, at 29.97 FPS w/ 48KHz 16-bit Audio. That was it, and was so simple. The NLE (Non Linear Editor) programs of the day were powerful, BUT were still quite simple, compared to what we have today.

     

    As I explored more, I realized that I could bring my creativity from my film days, to video, and the program would empower me for so much more. I got better, and better, learning something with each Project, and soon opened my doors to do commercial editing. Almost immediately, I began being handed all sorts of footage by clients, and some of it not meant to be edited - but I still had to edit it. That is where I learned about various file formats, and CODEC's, and also conversion programs. Though I had faced myriad formats with Photoshop, I found that was nothing, compared to the formats, and CODEC's of video. Lot of learning, but that was fun too.

     

    As I had spent so many years doing commercial still photography, it was natural that I also began producing SlideShows, where I got to experiment with Image Sizes and also formats. More learning, through my experiments.

     

    DVD-Video we my most common final output, and that brought a strict set of specifications, that had to be adhered to, for the DVD-Video to work properly.

     

    In my experiments, my eyes told me that I was best off, if I did the Scaling of my camera images in Photoshop, with either Bicubic Smoother, or Bicubic Sharper (depended on the original Image), and then Saved_As PSD's, for Import into Premiere (by then, I had used several other NLE's, but ended up focusing on Premiere, as it worked best for me). I eschewed JPEG (never really liked that format with its compression), and also took 90% of the Scaling load off of Premiere. To my eyes, the quality was better, and worth the effort.

     

    Having worked in photography, doing analog compositing, before there was digital editing, I was aware of resolution, and Scaling, and most of the pitfalls. However, as DVD-Video was still the main output, I understood its limits of 720 x 480 pixels. When I started HD TV's, and as my computer monitors increased in their resolution, I realized that DVD-Video was limited, but there was a war going on between BD and HDDVD, so there was not anything better. Rather than complain that DVD-Video was so limiting, I embraced it, as it was so, so very much better, than what had gone before, regarding video.

     

    When BD was finally decided upon, I was happy, but many clients still needed DVD-Video (and still do), so I had to continue with it, though "something better" was out there. Then, mfgrs. began adding up-rezzing chips to their high-end DVD players, and to most of their BD players, and DVD-Video display got even better, when paired with a calibrated HD TV.

     

    For me, it was easy to understand that a 720 x 480 video image would NOT look THAT good, when displayed on an HD TV, or high-rez computer monitor. It was like shooting 35mm film, and having to blow that up for a double-truck (11 x 17 inch) magazine spread! I knew to not expect too much, in such a case, and also normally shot 8 x 10 (4 x 5 minimum), when I was going to a two-page spread. DVD-Video is akin to shooting maybe 6 x 6 CM film, and going to that double-truck, when displayed on a high-rez computer monitor, or HD TV - never as good, as one would want. That is the nature of the beast.

     

    Soon, we will have 4K, and when it becomes common, those old DVD-Videos will look even worse. I do not think that up-rezzing chips will be improving all that much, especially when displayed on 4K. I also do not think that we will see any disc-based delivery above BD, as everything will go to streaming delivery for the new format. Still, like some people still have VHS tapes, and players, people will still have DVD-Video and BD (which never really did take off, like DVD-Video did). All of those will look pretty bad, compared to 4K material, shot, edited and delivered in that format. Still, those old formats will be around for a bit, and other than those up-rezzing chips, there is nothing that we can do about it - except to produce the best product in those formats, that is possible, and live with the results.

     

    Many have tried to explain the differences between, say DVD-Video and HD TV, but some folk just do not understand it. Having worked in all sorts of formats, with different resoulutions, it was easy for me. The best example that I have seen, to compare the formats is this little image:

    Digital_video_resolutions_(VCD_to_4K)_svg (1).png

    That should be clear to anyone.

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 5, 2013 8:24 AM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    I started with Mini DV 8 years ago when my daughter was born. Nero was the first editing software I had and it was fine but it compressed the AVI into some other format and the DVDs would start to pixelate and freeze so I switched to PE2. I was very familiar with adobe having used Photoshop for years and years. It was definitely a better program and the interface was great. It had a couple limitations that bugged me but overall, a far superior product.

     

    So I used it for around 7 years but my camcorder stopped focusing in lower light and just became a hassle. I started using my canon point and shoot for all video. It was HD so I had to reformat with"convertxtodvd" software. My pc was a little overmatched but held on for a while. Maybe 2 years of movies.

     

    Now I have a new, high powered pc so I got the latest combo of PE11 with photoshop. It has been a challenge to adjust especially since they do not provide a full manual with purchase. I used to dig through that book all the time with PE2. The help on boards like this and "elements village" are invaluable and greatly appreciated.

     

    I forgot to mention that the pics used in the timeline look fine in the finished product. It is only in the menus that I see the reduced quality. PE2 never did that but I guess it's because of the HD format.

     
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    Sep 5, 2013 12:17 PM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    Hunt

     

    Thanks for your response and walk through the history of your experience.  Where else can one get that kind of response!  It is most appreciated.  In my world I have just started to save everything to PSD format.  I do not have a HD camcorder yet so my expections are easly met.  I think this is one reason (for now anyways) I have not upgraded but will in the furture.  Also using the Bicubic shaper or smoother helps with scaling.  I started out with 8mm film developed and hand edited.  I guess this has made me a little more tollerent wieh it comes to working with shots that are not perfect, I often times will add an effect to deal with a bad shot.  This can add a nice change and unexpected interest to a disaster, afterall I am just trying to entertain.

     

    Thanks for your comment, will refernce your resolution example above and keep mindful of the differences! 

     

    Moonpie

     
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    Sep 5, 2013 10:19 PM   in reply to A.T. Romano

    It never occurred to me that I could get a blu ray burner and record in full HD. Would there be a noticeable difference between the DVD and HD?

     
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    Sep 6, 2013 5:31 AM   in reply to pizzakid13

    pizzakid13

     

    I think that you would do better starting your own thread on your Premiere Elements workflow. That way we can focus on your workflow specifically. As I always write "Problems with the same symptoms can (often do) have different causes."

     

    But let me respond to your immediate question to me here for now:

    It never occurred to me that I could get a blu ray burner and record in full HD. Would there be a noticeable difference between the DVD and HD?

     

    In the scheme of things, the purchase of Blu-ray equipment is relatively inexpensive...burner, players, discs but more expensive than if you were dealing with DVD. So, here is my idea for you before you make that Blu-ray investment. With the mix in this thread, I am not sure what version of Premiere Elements that you are using nor the operating system on which it is running and are set up for NTSC or PAL. So, I am assuming for now it is Premiere Elements 11 on Windows 7 or 8 64 bit.

     

    Take your stills (1920 x 1080) and burn them to a DVD-R or DVD-RW disc, BUT use the Publish+Share/Disc/AVCHD burn to disc. You can do that with your DVD burner; you do not need a Blu-ray burner for that. You will be putting your stills on the DVD disc in AVCHD format (1920 x 1080 @ 29.97 interlaced frames per second NTSC or 25 interlaced frames per second PAL). Contrast that with your DVD-VIDEO on DVD disc which would be 720 x 480 NTSC or 720 x 576 PAL

     

    Based on resolution alone, you should see a difference. Look at the quality of the stills as well as the quality of the menus. If you use stop markers in your Timeline, they will not function at playback on your Blu-ray burner for the Premiere Elements Blu-ray disc format on Blu-ray disc that you have created.

     

    Major consider with the AVCHD DVD choice is finding a player for the playback. For that you need a Blu-ray player. And, then at all Blu-ray players support AVCHD DVD. Your best opportunity for playback will be with a computer player. So given that you have such a computer player, I would suggest that you create the AVCHD DVD and see what it looks like at playback. If you like what you see, then you can consider an investment in the Blu-ray equipment and then do the burn to Blu-ray on Blu-ray disc. BD-R (25 GB) or BD-RE (25 GB). The BD-RE will offer opportunity for reuse, as the program erases the prior content before encoding the new material.

     

    ATR

     
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