Skip navigation
Currently Being Moderated

Spot color CMYK values are now LAB in indesign 6

Sep 20, 2013 6:34 AM

When I choose a spot color using InDesign 5, I get the CMYK values and have the option to use LAB values if I select "Use Standard Lab Values for Spots" from the ink manager.

 

In Indesign 6 I no longer have that option. The spot colors come in as LAB whether or not the "Use Standard Lab Values for Spots" is selected in the ink manager.

 

This is causing all kinds of problems. Why was the functionality changed. What can I do to have the program work as it did before?

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 20, 2013 7:37 AM   in reply to MickMaher1066

    The reason is because CS6 uses the newer Pantone Plus libraries which do use LAB values.

     

    I think you should be able to load the previous Pantone libraries into InDesign CS6 and use both the older and newer at the same time if you wanted (or switch to the old).

     

    Illustrator does not work the same way. You can only have one Pantone library at a time loaded, but can switch to the older library if you wanted.

     

    Google should turn up instructions.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 20, 2013 8:11 AM   in reply to MickMaher1066

    In color managed workflows it's generally accepted that Lab conversions give better results, but I can understand how for an older workflow where you are trying to match previous output you need the old numbers. You could try making a copy of the swatch, then redefine it to be Process and give it the numbers you want. If you name it something like Process Pantone XXX you should be able to delete the original spot swatches from the file and replace with the process versions (though this won't help with placed content that uses your spots).

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Rob Day
    3,122 posts
    Oct 16, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 20, 2013 9:02 AM   in reply to MickMaher1066

    Here are the legacy Pantone solid libraries

     

    http://www.zenodesign.com/forum/LegacyPantone.zip

     

    Unzip and copy to Applications:Adobe InDesign CS6:Presets:Swatch Libraries:

     

    These libraries don't replace Pantone + Solid, they will appear at the bottom of the selection list:

     

    ScreenSnapz001.png

     

    You still need to uncheck Use Lab to get CMYK:

     

    Screen Shot 2013-09-20 at 11.51.52 AM.png

     

    Coated, Matte, and Uncoated have the same definitions, so you only need one, in any case the definition, Lab or CMYK has no effect on the output of a spot color.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Rob Day
    3,122 posts
    Oct 16, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 20, 2013 1:20 PM   in reply to MickMaher1066

    So you see in my case choosing LAB or CMYK does have an effect on the output of a spot color.

     

    The definition affects the screen display or a composite proof simulation of the spot color, but not the extra spot color separation—if you spec a 100% tint of Pantone Orange it will output as 100% on the orange spot plate no matter what the color definition is.

     

    The definition would also affect the conversion to process color, but then it wouldn't be a spot color anymore. If your legacy jobs are really process color then the libraries I posted will work for preserving the original CMYK mixes. However those mixes are device dependent and would change in appearance depending on the press conditions

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Rob Day
    3,122 posts
    Oct 16, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 20, 2013 1:53 PM   in reply to MickMaher1066

    Why was the functionality changed.

    You might not notice the problems caused by solid ink CMYK definitions if you tend to leave Color Settings at the defaults.

     

    The obvious problem is with some colors that are out of the CMYK gamut and can't be displayed or printed with a CMYK mix. Pantone Purple is a good example. If you take the legacy mix for Pantone Purple—38|88|0|0—and assign it different CMYK profiles, you'll get different previews for the same mix, which simulates what would happen to the same values under different press conditions.

     

    If you were printing Purple as a spot color, the CMYK press conditions would have no effect on the color—with Lab definitons the CMYK profile also has no effect on the spot color's display.

     

    Here's Pantone Purple as Lab at the top, which is displaying the more accurate out-of-gamut color. Below is 38|88|0|0 with three different profile assignments, which one is right?:

     

    Screen Shot 2013-09-20 at 4.24.47 PM.png

     
    |
    Mark as:

More Like This

  • Retrieving data ...

Bookmarked By (0)

Answers + Points = Status

  • 10 points awarded for Correct Answers
  • 5 points awarded for Helpful Answers
  • 10,000+ points
  • 1,001-10,000 points
  • 501-1,000 points
  • 5-500 points