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wadeLFK
Currently Being Moderated

InDesign outputting 4c black: aka registration hell

Sep 20, 2013 10:30 AM

Tags: #color #pdf #indesign #blacks #4c

There are portions of my document that were created in InDesign as 100% black, but when the doucument is outputted to PDF the "output preview" function in Acrobat is showing those same portions as 4c black. What is going on? I have the most recent versions of everything and this has never been a problem before. Thanks. -Wade

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 20, 2013 10:39 AM   in reply to wadeLFK

    This is generally a sign that you are converting to a different CMYK space on export.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 20, 2013 10:40 AM   in reply to wadeLFK

    @Wade – what exact version of Acrobat Pro are you using?

    In a recent version of Acrobat Pro the values could be misleading…

    I'm using Acrobat Pro 9 and X. No problems here. But might be in version XI.

     

    As a test, just place the PDF in InDesign and check the colors there.
    Use the separation preview function.

     

    Uwe

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 20, 2013 10:54 AM   in reply to wadeLFK

    You place the PDF in ID, not open it...

     

    When exporting, what settings are you using for Color Conversion under Output? If you are converting to a profile  (and are not preserving numbers) and that profile is differnt from the assigned working space, you will get 4-color black. If you Convert to Destination (Preserve Numbers) the black will be preserved but other colors may shift.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 20, 2013 11:04 AM   in reply to wadeLFK

    OK, so what profile is assigned to the file, and what profile are you exporting to?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 20, 2013 11:17 AM   in reply to wadeLFK

    You're probaly using the default SWOP Coated v2 CMYK space, but we can confirm byt goint to Edit > Convert to Profile and see waht it says is the assigned document workspace, then cancel.

     

    The destination space is going to be listed in the Export options the printer gave you, under Output, a couple of lines below Color Conversion.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 20, 2013 11:25 AM   in reply to wadeLFK

    Yup, those are the North America General Purpose defaults.

     

    What's the destination?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 20, 2013 11:34 AM   in reply to wadeLFK

    Sorry, My bad. The destination profile will be on the second line, right under Color Conversion. Another screen capture would be pretty helpful...

     
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  • Rob Day
    3,138 posts
    Oct 16, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 20, 2013 11:38 AM   in reply to wadeLFK

    If you are exporting without including profiles, there is a bug wth AcrobatXI where you'll get conversion numbers if Acrobat's CM CMYK Working space conflicts with the profile you've chosen as the output simulation profile.

     

    Try opening Acrobats Color management and set the Working space to match.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 20, 2013 11:47 AM   in reply to wadeLFK

    Yes, those setting preserve the color numbers.

     

    The destination space is for uncoated newsprint, very porous paper that runs at high speed, and your clors will come out a bit muted compared to what you are seeing on screen (but newpaper color ALWAYS looks pretty bad ). If your monitor is calibrated you can get a pretty good idea of what the file will look like by going to View > Proof Setup.. and choosing the SNAP profile from the list, then choosing View > Proof Colors, but you may find it easier to just go to Edit > ASSIGN (not convert) Profiles... and chooes the SNAP profile, then your working sapce will match the destination and you should see a good preview if you turn on Overprint Preview.

     
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  • Rob Day
    3,138 posts
    Oct 16, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 20, 2013 12:46 PM   in reply to wadeLFK

    In addition to Peter's advice, SNAP has a really low total ink limit (220%), so your export setting will convert placed images to the SNAP profile honoring the limit, while leaving native CMYK alone. So you should double check that you don't have any swatches or colors over 220, for example dark red 40|100|100|0 would be a violation. You might check with the printer for their limit.

     

    It's always better to start working with the final destination profile assigned to the document, the default SWOP profile could show you a very misleading soft proof as you choose color. And you will avoid CMYK-to-CMYK image conversions, which are never ideal.

     
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