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Phil Carson
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Novice Needs Voiceover Help

Oct 20, 2013 8:29 AM

Hi, everyone.  I am a new user to Audition CS6, and am mostly interested in it's voice manipulation abilities for the voiceover market.  I have some excellent learning materials (Lynda.com; Classroom In A Book; etc.), but would appreciate anyone's input on where I can find voice specific comprehensive tutorials.  There are a few on YouTube, but like I said, I really need something more comprehensive than a few 5 or 10 minute videos.  Thanks in advance for your help!

 

Oh, I'm more interested in the actual editing capabilities rather than the recording capabilities (for now).

Thanks again!

 
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  • SteveG(AudioMasters)
    5,602 posts
    Oct 26, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 20, 2013 8:32 AM   in reply to Phil Carson

    You aren't going to find comprehensive tutorials about this specifically, I'm afraid.

     

    You need to do two things really (okay only one if you already know about voice-over work), and the first one is simply to learn how Audition works. This has nothing to do with voice-work - it's simply a matter of getting used to what the program can do. The general tutorials will do this fine for you - just pay attention to how to use compression and EQ; that will get you out of most of the difficulties you encounter.

     

    The second thing (if you are new to vocal work) is to get hold of a good book about it. Yes there are loads, but I'll recommend one specifically, because it comes with a CD and it's pretty useful - The Art of Voice Acting. And if you can't figure it all out like this, then come back here and ask specific questions - they're the ones we can deal with best.

     
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    Oct 20, 2013 7:27 PM   in reply to Phil Carson

    Just as an addition to what Steve said, worry about the acoustics of your room and the quality of your original recording .  If you have a good sounding original, you're 90% of the way there and the EQ and Compression are just the icing on the cake.  If the original recording isn't good then you can fight all day and still not be happy with the results.

     

    If you don't have the space or resources for a treated room, you might look at the sE "Reflexion Filters".  I know Steve and I both use them sometimes and, while no substitute for a painstakingly treated recording studio, they probably go about 80% of the way for a lot less space and money.

     

    Good luck!

     
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  • SteveG(AudioMasters)
    5,602 posts
    Oct 26, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 21, 2013 1:54 AM   in reply to Bob Howes

    Bob Howes wrote:

     

    If you don't have the space or resources for a treated room, you might look at the sE "Reflexion Filters".  I know Steve and I both use them sometimes and, while no substitute for a painstakingly treated recording studio, they probably go about 80% of the way for a lot less space and money.

    Yes, they're rather good - better than I thought they'd be, in fact. There's a whole load of stuff I didn't go into - room treatment, mic choice and positioning, etc. and because they're written by voice-over artistes as a rule, books don't go into too much detail about rooms and equipment. That's not the only reason either - equipment changes, and by the time it's been printed a book is almost bound to be out of date.

     

    That said, there's still quite a conservative attitude towards mics for voice, and inevitably some perrenial favourites, which have been available almost forever. None of them are cheap though...

     
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    Oct 21, 2013 6:30 AM   in reply to Phil Carson

    Okay, for the editing probably the best analogy I can give is to treat it like you would like a word processor.  You can cut and paste phrases pretty much the same way as you would with text.

     

    I'd tend to do it in multitrack mode just so I can have the multiple takes (in several tracks) all open at the same time--use a mix of solo and mute to listen to the track you want.

     

    Cut out the bits you want to replace and either discard them or put them in an empty track--copy the new bits you want and paste them in.  Easy peasey.  You can use the Edit/Cut/Paste mouse commands or (better) teach yourself keyboard short cuts.

     

    Three hints:

     

    -Zoom in close horizontally when picking edit points

     

    -Be careful to leave natural pauses.  Don't edit directly from the end of one phrase to the start of another.  Leave the pause at the end or beginning of one of them.

     

    -Turn on the zero crossings feature.

     

    It'll feel awkward at first but it really is easy and you'll quickly get very fast.

     

    I know this isn't a tutorial but this might be a case of where diving in and experimenting would do more good than watching videos or reading guides.

     
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  • SteveG(AudioMasters)
    5,602 posts
    Oct 26, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 21, 2013 6:44 AM   in reply to Phil Carson

    Phil Carson wrote:

     

     

    Basically, I'm interested in learning how to put together multiple phrases into a single sentence.  For example:

     

         "XYZ company appreciates your business", "your business".  "Please call again soon".  "call again soon".

     

    I need to learn how to put these clips into a simple sentence - sometimes even in the middle of a word, consonant or vowel.  Then normalizing and other quick fixes can take place after that.  Or should I do that first?

    Whilst it will be easier to listen whilst editing if the insertions are about the same level as the rest of the material, one the one hand it doesn't matter, and on the other it does. That might not appear to make sense, but actually it does. This is because Audition has two basic ways of assembling material like that, and the constraints are completely different. If you edit in Waveform view (ie, destructively) it's very quick, and easy to save, but you'll have a lot more trouble evening up the results afterwards.

     

    But, if you assemble your phrases in (non-destructive) Multitrack view, it won't matter at all, because you can fine-tune everything about the way the clips sound after you've done the basic assembly of them. When you've got it all sounding correct though, you still have to do a mixdown to end up with the final file, so there's an extra step to do.

     

    If I was doing this, I'd go for the multitrack approach, because you can save your work as a session, and if you need to go back and make changes, it's much easier and more flexible. So what you might do is to record all of the phrases and have them in one file, to which you can add markers. Then you have a choice; export either the marker ranges to multitrack view, or turn each marker range into a discrete file, and import those instead. The first method actually works fine (when you've figured out how to do it*), and results in less file clutter.

     

    * highlight the marker ranges in the marker list, right click on it, and you have an option to export them to Multitrack view. The only unfortunate thing about this is that it will dump them in a line, all onto one track, and you then have to separate them to put them where you want them. If you give the markers sensible names though, it's not too onerous a task.

     
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