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Freddy Ching
Currently Being Moderated

Volume Measurement

Oct 20, 2013 12:47 PM

Hello,

 

Is it possibe to measure the volume of inaudiable frequencies within Audition?

 

Thanks

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 20, 2013 2:51 PM   in reply to Freddy Ching

    When you say "inaudible" do you mean because they are very quiet or because they are out of the normal frequency range of human hearing? Can you describe an example?

     
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  • SteveG(AudioMasters)
    5,593 posts
    Oct 26, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 20, 2013 4:36 PM   in reply to Freddy Ching

    Freddy Ching wrote:

     

    Is it possibe to measure the volume of inaudiable frequencies within Audition?

    Not in a meaningful way, no. 'Volume' in the sense that I suspect that you mean implies that they have to be audible...

     
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  • SteveG(AudioMasters)
    5,593 posts
    Oct 26, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 21, 2013 1:25 PM   in reply to Freddy Ching

    Freddy Ching wrote:

     

    I've looked around and have seen somewhere that high volume can be dangerous whether it is audiable or not and can be more dangerous if you cannot hear it.

     

    I'd like to know how you can ascertain the volume of inaudiable frequencies if they are played out of the speakers on a pc or laptop?  How could I determine whether the audio is too loud when I cannot hear it.

    The chances of anything you can't hear coming out of a normal loudspeaker and damaging your hearing are pretty much zero - at high frequencies you'd blow it up, and even then it wouldn't be at damaging levels - there's simply not enough power available.

     

    No you can't tell with Audition because it doesn't determine levels anyway - the volume control does that, and Audition has no control over it - therefore measurement like that simply isn't possible.

     

    Yes there are loudspeakers that could damage your hearing like this, but they would either be PA horns being fed by kilowatts of power, or specialist transducers designed to output frequencies beyond human the human hearing range at high levels.

     

    Chances are that as an adult, if you can't hear it, you're already at least partially deaf at that frequency. This is a normal artefact of aging called presbycusis, and there's not a single thing you can do about it - once it's happened, that's it - you won't get it back again.

     

    But - that doesn't mean that you shouldn't continue to look after your hearing though, however bad this gets, because prolonged exposure to even more noise will make it degenerate further and faster. And if it hasn't happened to you yet, then that's an even better reason for looking after it - simply by avoiding excess noise exposure.

     

    The one thing worth mentioning specifically in this context is headphones. Listening at high levels on these can very easily overload your ears, and you should guard against this particularly.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 21, 2013 2:37 PM   in reply to Freddy Ching

    A good example of all of the above is the "mosquito" generators that were supposed to dissuade teenagers from gathering on street corners. Now banned I believe.

     

    http://movingsoundtech.com/

     
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  • SteveG(AudioMasters)
    5,593 posts
    Oct 26, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 21, 2013 4:37 PM   in reply to ryclark

    The mosquito generators were never loud enough to do damage - they were just very irritating. To do damage with one, you'd need to be quite close, and carefully lined up with a teenager's ear, and apply it for quite a while. Fat chance!

     

    As for animals - well that's true, and with some it's well beyond human hearing - over twice the frequency range. The one I have some experience of is our 18-yr-old cat (cats as youngsters have way better hearing than dogs do). When he was younger, my ultrasonic door leak detector drove him completely round the bend - he'd run away almost when I got it out of the box! But now, because cats suffer from presbycusis too, he can't hear it at all. He's not deaf though - far from it; It's just the upper range that's failed him.

     
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