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ArtOfVision
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Is there a tool, that my clients can use for editing online content developed with Dreamweaver CC?

Jan 14, 2014 9:03 AM

Tags: #template #client_editing #dreamweave_cc

I am developing websites in responsive webdesign using Dreamweaver. The sites are using Dreamweaver templates with editable and locked reagions. My clients want to add text and Images to existing pages. It is not necessary to use a complex right-administration system or to keep former states. They just want to use something simple with handling similar to Word to make changes in the editable regions.

 
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 14, 2014 9:21 AM   in reply to ArtOfVision

    I have never used it, but I think Contribute can do what you're looking for ($99)...

     

    http://www.adobe.com/products/contribute.html

     

    Otherwise you'll need to develop some kind of Content Management System in php (or some other server side language) to make sure your client can't break things. Maybe switch the site over to Wordpress or something similar.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 14, 2014 10:08 AM   in reply to ArtOfVision

    One of my clients and I tried Contribute about five years ago and hated it. Have no idea if it has improved since then.

     
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  • Jim Carpenter
    546 posts
    Apr 6, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 14, 2014 11:51 AM   in reply to Rob Hecker2

    Adobe Contribute will allow you to do edits. You have to have a copy of DW to administer it. I believe the administrator will have to have a copy also, so the price is double.

    Jim

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 14, 2014 12:02 PM   in reply to ArtOfVision

    Content Management Systems (CMS)

     

    Cushy CMS (watch the video to see how it works)

    No PHP or databases required.

    http://www.cushycms.com

     

    Perch ($59 license per site)

    PHP & MySql required

    http://grabaperch.com/

     

    Adobe Business Catalyst (subscription includes CMS & web hosting on BC servers)

    http://www.businesscatalyst.com/

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 14, 2014 6:12 PM   in reply to ArtOfVision

    Most clients want browser based editing so that they can log in to the site and make edits from any internet connected computer or device.

     

    Contribute was a good idea when it was first developed in 2002 but it is still licensed by the seat and needs to be installed locally to be used. It is also software which must be learned in terms of interface and workflow.

     

    If your client has several computers and Contribute is only installed on one (or two at most) then those computers are the only ones from which the website can be edited. That's an extremely inflexible workflow these days.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 14, 2014 7:12 PM   in reply to ArtOfVision

    If they know a thing or two about HTML/CSS and they have basic common sense then they can use Microsoft Expression Web free of charge.

     

    <http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=36179>

     

    They can edit any webpage and/or css file using this wonderful tool.

     

    It is not 42 degrees C here in UK fortunately.

     

    Good luck.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 15, 2014 9:08 AM   in reply to ArtOfVision

    Expression Web won't recognize DW's Templates.  The client would have full access to all aspects of the site. 

     

    Most CMSs have a WYSIWYG Editor that looks like Word so it's easy for clients for to use.  And you can designate which elements  are editable and lock down everything else.

     

     

    Nancy O

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 15, 2014 1:33 PM   in reply to ArtOfVision

    Most of my clients prefer Wordpress as a CMS - though WP can be daunting for anyone who only has basic knowledge of html, css, js, and php.

     

    Nowadays almost any client comes to me with the question if I can build their website in WP, whether for good or bad ;-)

     

    I suppose there is a reason why more than 20% of all websites on the web now run on WP, and it takes 40~60% of the CMS market currently. Clients just like it - it's very easy to use for the end user.

     

    Bit scary, actually.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 15, 2014 2:28 PM   in reply to Herbert2001

    I admit to being initially impressed with WP when I saw all it could do.  But over time I grew to hate it.  Every upgrade resulted in wasted hours chasing down solutions for a Theme, Plugin or other add-on that suddenly stopped working.  No more WP for me.

     

     

     

     

    Nancy O.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 15, 2014 2:39 PM   in reply to Herbert2001

    I'm still in the Wordpress fan club myself. It still offers most of the power and flexibility that my clients are looking for and they have adapted to it well.

     

    I was initially overwhelmed with the regular WP updates but they've become more automated and regulated.

     

    I've restricted sites to Premium Themes and plugins which are generally well supported. I also run plugins e.g. Vaultpress which automate the backup and recovery process.

     

    Last time my client moved server (their host, their choice) we migrated the entire WP site with the Vaultpress plugin. It was fully functional within an hour. All parties were very happy with that outcome.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 15, 2014 2:39 PM   in reply to Nancy O.

    Yes, I can completely understand your experience with WP - the client situation changed drastically about seven years ago for me, and it forced my hand to learn to code and develop within the WP framework. I create WP themes and plugins from scratch, so I do not have to hunt down solutions for pre-built themes.

     

    However, even after all this time I neither like nor dislike WP - it's part of what almost all my clients want, so I need to deal with it. I admit that only reasonably experienced html/css/js/php developers should try their hands at Wordpress.

     

    Unless the client wants a simpler WP site, of course. Systems like Gantry can make life somewhat easier as well in WP.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 15, 2014 3:59 PM   in reply to Herbert2001

    Could this be what you are looking for http://www.dmxzone.com/go/18529/online-page-editor-add-on/?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 15, 2014 8:07 PM   in reply to Ben Pleysier

    I routinely build custom CMS managed web sites and pages with a little PHP and some JavaScript. They are as easy to edit as a Facebook post, allow multiple users, can use any API or fancy widget from just about any source, and they are extremely lightweight and quick.

     

    I can set up multiple levels of user permissions, permissions to author articles, edit articles, or publish articles. Usually the total file count for a web site is under 50. Anyone who develops a good strong knowledge of MySQLi, PHP, and CSS, can do this.

     

    Set up a database table for pages, sections, articles, assigns, and then just use standard relational database procedures to tie them altogether. You can use one page layout for your main content and have it automatically divide up into rows and columns based on your CSS and a few cleverly written if statements.

     

    For example:

    <php if($row_section['column']==2){

      echo '<div class="col2">',$row_article['heading'],  $row_article['intro'],  $row_article['content'], "</div>" } ?>

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 15, 2014 8:28 PM   in reply to ArtOfVision

    ArtOfVision wrote:

     

    I am developing websites in responsive webdesign using Dreamweaver. The sites are using Dreamweaver templates with editable and locked reagions. My clients want to add text and Images to existing pages. It is not necessary to use a complex right-administration system or to keep former states. They just want to use something simple with handling similar to Word to make changes in the editable regions.

    If you are developing your site with DW then clearly any CMS package is not going to help your client.  Also, if all they need to do is add some images and change some text on some pages in the editable area then clearly access to DWT and all that nonsense does not apply to them.  by the way what is their knowledge of HTML/CSS?

     

    You really need to be practical and give them a site properly constructed and let them add whatever they want in the editable area using any tools they can use - Notepad, Notepad++, plain text editor or even the SeaMonkey's composer.

     

    Don't ever make the mistake of starting everything all over again using CMS unless you have plenty of time, and your client is paying you for duplicating the work.  In that case good luck and keep printing money.  That is what capitalism is for.

     
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