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Same computer - Photoshop banding, Lightroom no banding.

Feb 14, 2014 6:04 PM

Hi! There is something that I'm not sure I understand, in the same computer, if I make a new 16 bits file in photoshop and do a gradient from top to bottom, from black to white, in Photoshop I see a lot of banding, but if I save the file, and load it in Lightroom, it looks perfectly fine, no banding at all... any idea why can be that Photoshop can't display this correctly and Ligthroom can perfectly? Same hardware?

 

Thanks!

 
Replies
  • JJMack
    5,995 posts
    Jan 9, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 14, 2014 6:23 PM   in reply to Victor Wolansky

    Please post screen captures of your problem which shows all you Photoshop palettes.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 15, 2014 2:55 AM   in reply to Victor Wolansky

    In some cases this can happen with really poor quality laptop displays with a 6-bit color depth.

     

    But usually this banding is introduced by less than optimal calibration. I see equal color banding in these two, but more pronounced luminance banding in the PS version (which could be caused by different on-screen scaling ratios).

     

    The culprit is either the calibration look-up table (the video card correction to the display's response), or the display profile itself (the description of the display in its calibrated state). Usually the former is much more likely as it's an 8-bit pipeline with much less precision than the profile, but if there is a real difference between the two it would have to be the profile.

     

    This is in any case a quite common occurrence with calibrators that do their adjustments in the video card. This is why high-end monitors come with dedicated hardware calibrators, which load the calibration data directly into the monitor's high-bit internal look-up table (NEC Spectraview, Eizo ColorNavigator).

     

    Try to recalibrate with slightly different settings. Also try to bring the display as close to the calibration targets as possible before actual calibration.

     

    EDIT: An important difference between Ps and Lr is that the former "farms out" color management operations to the GPU at default settings. So that could explain the difference. To test, try to uncheck "Use Graphics Processor" in Ps preferences.

     
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  • JJMack
    5,995 posts
    Jan 9, 2006
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    Feb 15, 2014 8:06 PM   in reply to twenty_one

    Your Photoshop image is also zoomed out so its being shown at 16.7 % its size. How does your gradient look in Photoshop  at 100% where Photoshop is displaying your images actual document pixels not a quickly scaled rendering at 16.7% of the document actual size less the 1/5 the actual pixels on a 6, 8, or 10 bits color dispalay where the document color are 16bit color depth.

     
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  • Noel Carboni
    23,513 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 15, 2014 7:13 PM   in reply to twenty_one

    twenty_one wrote:

     


    EDIT: An important difference between Ps and Lr is that the former "farms out" color management operations to the GPU at default settings. So that could explain the difference. To test, try to uncheck "Use Graphics Processor" in Ps preferences.

     

    Color management moves to the CPU in Basic drawing mode also.

     

    -Noel

     
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