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Any GPUs for Windows that support both CUDA and Open CL?

Feb 21, 2014 6:49 PM

Tags: #photoshop #cuda #premiere #windows #gpu #aftereffects #graphics_card #open_cl

Hi everyone,

 

I was looking at this list:  http://www.adobe.com/products/premiere/tech-specs.html

 

while trying to decide which graphics card to buy to take advantage of Mercury playback.  I couldn't help but notice that there is not a single card listed that is compatible for both CUDA and Open CL in windows.  Do I really have to pick one or the other?  In that case, which would be more beneficial to a Premiere Pro workflow that utilizes a lot of dynamic links to After Effects?  As a side note, I use Photoshop a ton, and would love to keep my GPU acceleration in that arena as well.

 

Thanks!

 

-Charlie

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 22, 2014 12:25 AM   in reply to charlielavoy1
    there is not a single card listed that is compatible for both CUDA and Open CL in windows.

    Any NVIDIA GPU with latest drivers installed supports both CUDA and OpenCL.

     
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    Feb 22, 2014 11:55 AM   in reply to Fuzzy Barsik

    Only on a Mac.  Premiere Pro doesn't offer both options from one card on Windows.  If you want OpenCL, you need to use AMD.  If you want CUDA, you need nVidia.

     

    At this point in time, I'd stick with nVidia.

     
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    Feb 22, 2014 11:59 AM   in reply to Jim Simon

    Jim, do you understand that NVIDIA took part in developing OpenCL and OpenCL is implemented as a 'superstructure' of CUDA?

     
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    Feb 22, 2014 12:01 PM   in reply to Fuzzy Barsik

    I understand that OpenCL is available on nVidia cards.  It's just that PP won't use it on Windows.  Only Mac users get that option.

     
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    Feb 22, 2014 12:05 PM   in reply to Jim Simon

    Well, that is correct. Probably Adobe engineers simply didn't port MPE code for CUDA on Windows to OpenCL yet, which doesn't matter at all from a user perspective.

     
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    Feb 22, 2014 2:03 PM   in reply to charlielavoy1

    Sorry, you probably do not understand the subject completely...

    Both AMD and NVIDIA support OpenCL, while CUDA is an earlier proprietary NVIDIA technology and hence can't be implemented in AMD cards. It doesn't actually matter for you as a PrPro user instruction in which programming language Adobe engineers write so that Mercury Playback Engine works on Windows.

     
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    Feb 22, 2014 3:06 PM   in reply to charlielavoy1

    does this mean you can't use Mercury playback in Windows?

     

    You can, using CUDA if you go with an nVidia card or using OpenCL if you buy an AMD card.  You just can't get both options from one card under Windows.  You have to choose.

     
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    Feb 22, 2014 10:38 PM   in reply to Jim Simon
    You can, using CUDA if you go with an nVidia card or using OpenCL if you buy an AMD card.

    Rather Adobe engineers use OpenCL for implementing GPU acceleration for AMD cards while CUDA only instructions for NVIDIA cards on Windows. A PrPro user can only use Mercury Playback Engine in GPU accelerated mode, not CUDA or OpenCL per se.

    You just can't get both options from one card under Windows.  You have to choose.

    The only user-side option is to choose between AMD and NVIDIA, he/she has no power over the decision whether to port CUDA instructions for NVIDIA cards on Windows to OpenCL or not.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 23, 2014 10:57 AM   in reply to Fuzzy Barsik

    A PrPro user can only use Mercury Playback Engine in GPU accelerated mode, not CUDA or OpenCL per se.

     

    No, they are listed separately in PP.  Mac users, for instance, can choose either CUDA processing or OpenCL processing using the same nVidia card.  It's just that on Windows, only the CUDA option is presented, and it is labeled as such.

     
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    Feb 23, 2014 11:08 AM   in reply to Jim Simon
    Mac users, for instance, can choose either CUDA processing or OpenCL processing using the same nVidia card.  It's just that on Windows, only the CUDA option is presented, and it is labeled as such.

    Mac users can choose between what was implemented by Adobe engineers. One day, if Adobe decides to port already written CUDA code to OpenCL, a Windows PrPro user, who has NVIDIA card installed, may get similar checkboxes out of the blue with a regular update.

     
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    Feb 23, 2014 11:26 AM   in reply to Fuzzy Barsik

    if Adobe decides to port already written CUDA code to OpenCL

     

    I don't think that's how it works.  I believe they write OpenCL separately.  They're two different APIs.

     

    But, even if a 'port' were possible, as opposed to a ground up rewritte, I'm not sure I understand the point you're trying to make here.  Right now, you cannot use OpenCL processing with an nVidia card on Windows, you have to use AMD.  And of course, you'll never get CUDA processing on an AMD card.  So the answer to the original question is that you can't get both OpenCL and CUDA from one card under Windows.

     
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    Feb 23, 2014 11:49 AM   in reply to Jim Simon
    I believe they write OpenCL separately.  They're two different APIs.

    They are not that different, while 'porting' doesn't imply completely automatic process. Rewriting existing libraries from one language to another is something almost any developer is familiar with.

    I'm not sure I understand the point you're trying to make here.  Right now, you cannot use OpenCL processing with an nVidia card on Windows.

    The point is simple: both CUDA and OpenCL are supported by NVIDIA cards. The fact that Adobe engineers haven't ported libraries for GPU acceleration in MPE on Windows from CUDA to OpenCL so far doesn't mean they never will. Hence the statement that a user-side choice between AMD and NVIDIA equals to choice between OpenCL and CUDA is incorrect.

     
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    Feb 23, 2014 11:52 AM   in reply to Fuzzy Barsik

    Ahhh, now I get it.

     

    I do hope that Adobe will add OpenCL processing to nVidia under Windows.  I should have qualified my original statement by saying that for now, the user needs to decide between AMD and nVidia in order to use either OpenCL or CUDA.

     
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