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upgrading a student license to commercial

Dec 29, 2007 12:17 PM

Hey,

I'm posting to ask how much it costs to upgrade a student license of CS3 Design Premium to the commercial license - it's unclear in the Adobe online store.

Can anyone help?

Chris
 
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 29, 2007 11:38 PM   in reply to (Chris_Baraniuk)
    There is no upgrade from the CS3 Educational Edition to the comparable CS3 editions sold in non-academic environments. If you have an educational version of for CS3 obtained legitimately (i.e., you qualified for the educational version when you obtained it), you may continue to use that software for the indefinite future, even for commercial use! You cannot sell or otherwise transfer that license, though! When the next version of the Creative Suite is released, you will have two choices: (1) If you still qualify for the educational version, you can buy a copy of that next version (there is no special upgrade pricing from one educational version to another; the price is already very low) or (2) you can upgrade from the educational version of CS3 to the full version of the next version of the Creative Suite as an upgrade from CS3 at the prices published at that time.

    - Dov
     
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    Dec 30, 2007 12:32 PM   in reply to (Chris_Baraniuk)
    > Thanks, but how would I be able to use my student license for commercial
    > purposes since it was explicitly stated when I purchased it that I
    > couldn't??

    Exactly which products/version/licenses do you have?

    Were they purchased under volume licensing or as standalone products?

    By "explicitly stated" do you mean verbal advice when you purchased or was
    it written somewhere?

    Looking around online I see that there is confusion amongst end users on
    this whole issue.

    --
    Regards

    John Waller
     
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    Dec 30, 2007 1:35 PM   in reply to Dov Isaacs
    Thanks for the post, Dov.

    See comments inline:

    > The EULA (end user license agreement) and the purchase qualification
    > requirements for the current Adobe educational versions of products
    > (including all versions of the Creative Suite from Adobe) have no
    > restrictions on use of the product by the purchaser of the license.

    Is this clearly stated in a KB article (or similar) anywhere? Seems not many
    people read (or have the confidence to read) the EULA to draw this
    conclusion.

    It's certainly not common knowledge amongst students.

    > See for
    > qualifications for purchasing educational editions of Adobe software.

    Qualifying to purchase EDU versions does not seem to be an issue with most
    people.

    The perennial question is: "As a student (and after I graduate), can I
    legally use my EDU version of the software for paid work?" This seems to be
    answered above but is not common knowledge amonst students.

    > Note the following from
    >

    > that pertains only to pre-Creative Suite 3 educational versions of
    > Macromedia productions:
    > What are the restrictions in using education versions of Adobe products?
    > A customer may only purchase one copy of any product. Education versions
    > of Former Macromedia products only (Studio 8, Dreamweaver, Flash, etc.)
    > are intended for instructional and administrative purposes only and may
    > not be used for any commercial purpose.

    This confuses many students.

    If they have Educational versions of CS or CS2, they can legally do paid-for
    work - even after graduation. But not if they have Studio 8, DW8, Flash 8
    etc.

    They can do paid-for work with all CS3 products including DW, Flash etc -
    before and after graduation.

    Is that correct?

    --
    Regards

    John Waller
     
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    Dec 30, 2007 2:51 PM   in reply to (Chris_Baraniuk)
    It is correct.

    - Dov
     
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    Jan 7, 2008 12:30 PM   in reply to (Chris_Baraniuk)
    Chris,

    Your posting led me to take a look at the "other" Adobe websites. From what I can best determine, it is only in North America (US and Canada) that the "educational edition" of Adobe software has no restriction on subsequent commercial use as long as the purchaser whas qualified for the educational version when it was purchased.

    Apparently, outside of North America, the "student edition" of Adobe software does indeed restrict, via license, use of this software to non-commercial use.

    Sorry for the confusion.

    - Dov
     
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    Jan 7, 2008 10:24 PM   in reply to Dov Isaacs
    Dov,

    An academic question if you will:

    1) If an academic purchases a copy while in the US and moves to Europe,
    will he/she be covered by the original license or the European?

    2) If an academic purchases a copy while in Europe and moves to the US
    will he/she be covered by the original license or the European?

    Some not so academic questions:

    3) My Macromedia software with academic license did not allow for
    commercial use, now that Adobe purchased Macromedia is commercial use
    now allowed. (probably not)

    4) Do European academics pay less for their software, since they have
    reduced rights. (probably not)

    ...Mike
     
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    Jan 8, 2008 9:18 AM   in reply to (Chris_Baraniuk)
    Mike,

    Bad puns notwithstanding, I am not a lawyer, but I would assume your original license would stand unless overuled by law at your destination.

    With regards to your third question, the licenses from Macromedia (i.e., prior to CS3) still stand for those products and versions.

    As simply a dumb engineer, I am not in a position to analyze or comment on pricing.

    - Dov
     
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    Jan 8, 2008 8:21 PM   in reply to Dov Isaacs
    Thanks for the answer. I really think that Adobe would be best off with
    standardized licensing across the planet (as much as local laws allow).
    However, Adobe doesn't ask me. Heck, the same holds at my work and all
    too often at home. :-)

    Mike
     
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    Jan 8, 2008 9:16 PM   in reply to (Chris_Baraniuk)
    Hey, they don't ask me either and I allegedly work there!

    - Dov
     
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    Jan 9, 2008 9:18 AM   in reply to (Chris_Baraniuk)
    Hi,
    I am a really confused student. I purchased an educational cs2 at the college bookstore. Can I or can I not purchase the $200 upgrade to cs3 and install it?
    Thank you.
     
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    Jan 9, 2008 11:47 AM   in reply to (Chris_Baraniuk)
    If you bought the North American educational version of Creative Suite 2, yes, you can upgrade it to the equivalent commercial version of Creative Suite 3. Further questions, call Adobe Customer Support.

    - Dov
     
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    Jan 10, 2008 8:40 AM   in reply to (Chris_Baraniuk)
    I just called customer service, and one is not allowed to make porfit off of educational license. There is also not upgrade available, one must buy the whole program at commercial prices.
     
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    Jan 10, 2008 11:25 AM   in reply to (Chris_Baraniuk)
    Jessica,

    Please identify your location. The response outside North America is very different from within North America.

    - Dov
     
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    Jan 10, 2008 11:37 AM   in reply to (Chris_Baraniuk)
    Well, I am in Oklahoma. I simply called customer service, identified that I had bought the prod. prem. cs3 educational, and asked if I was able to use the student version after I had graduated for "business or for-profit" and the woman simply said that was not an option. "As an educational version it is intended for one to learn on...etc" and said that it was not in the license to use the product after graduating for profit.

    I read the agreement, and it only says one may use the software for educational purposes only and I could not find anything regarding the subject.

    As far as I am aware from my discussion with the woman, I would not be able to use my software once graduated for a job, or upgrade from the educational to the professional.

    If there is any way I can rectify this situation or a loop hole I am missing- please point it out- as it saves a couple grand.
     
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    Jan 10, 2008 12:26 PM   in reply to (Chris_Baraniuk)
     
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    Jan 10, 2008 2:22 PM   in reply to (Chris_Baraniuk)
     
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    Jan 10, 2008 2:26 PM   in reply to (Chris_Baraniuk)
    Dov,

    Thanks for the urgent response and know you have saved a lot of trouble for me and my fellow designers as I will spread the word. Keep up the great work and thanks again. If there is any update to your research let me know.

    Jessica
     
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    Apr 24, 2008 10:38 PM   in reply to (Chris_Baraniuk)
    I have a friend that bought Flash CS3 educational version and then updated the serial with Adobe for commercial use after he finished school.
    But now he bought Design Premium (not an upgrade) and wants to give me his Flash CS3 and transfer the license so I can use it for freelance work.

    It started out an educational license then turned into a commercial one. Technically, it's not an education license anymore so he would be allowed to transfer it to me, right?

    http://kb.adobe.com/selfservice/viewContent.do?externalId=kb402371&sli ceId=2

    "When you upgrade an Education product, you get a new End User License Agreement (EULA) that overrides the original license agreement and no longer restricts you to educational use."
     
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    Apr 25, 2008 8:41 AM   in reply to (Chris_Baraniuk)
    It should be fine in North America. Other regions might be different.

    There's a license transfer form that your friend will need to complete, and he's supposed to give you the entire chain of media involved in the upgrades.

    Peter
     
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    Apr 26, 2008 1:47 PM   in reply to (Chris_Baraniuk)
    My daughter is about to graduate from college and we have the chance to get adobe Creative 3 design premium for $395. My question is when it comes to upgrade time, can we just upgrade to the photoshop cs4 rather than the entire suite. We really only use the photoshop product.
     
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    Apr 26, 2008 2:02 PM   in reply to (Chris_Baraniuk)
    No. If you have the package, you need to upgrade the whole package as a unit.

    But you should be able to buy just Photoshop on an education license for even less than the cost of the suite, and that would give you a choice at upgrade time (assuming they don't change the rules), although the upgrades from standalone Photoshop to a full suite would be more expensive than the upgrade from a suite package.

    My advice, though is to go ahead and buy the suite. That's a real bargain price and you'll never get an opportunity to get another chance to buy the rest of the applications at that price again. The odds are pretty good that your daughter will eventually want to use at least one more of the suite components.

    Peter
     
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    Apr 26, 2008 2:22 PM   in reply to (Chris_Baraniuk)
    Jay,

    $395?? Make sure that it's a regular education version vs. the education volume licensing. I just called Adobe about the same thing and they said that if it's much lower than the price on their site then it might be a volume license that only a school is able to do. That means that you can use that software for the entire time you are in school but not afterwards. Where as the educational version on the Adobe Store website is the version that you are able to use (even commercially) after graduation and you can also upgrade it (entire suite). At least that's what the sales rep said. The price on the Adobe Store site is around $599 for Design Premium. For an extra couple hun I wouldn't take the chance with the one at the school.
     
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    Apr 26, 2008 5:45 PM   in reply to (Chris_Baraniuk)
    I will not reveal this top level college. But when you graduate from this college the license states that you own the perpetial license to this product. But you must graduate. I suppose after spending thousands for this flagship education, we deserve the license for this price. I have paid hundreds dollars in computer fees with this institution. So please don't envy me the price I'm paying. I have more than paid for it!
     
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    Apr 26, 2008 6:21 PM   in reply to (Chris_Baraniuk)
    A student license under the "education volume licensing" plan may be "perpetual" but you don't necessarily have any ability to upgrade at a discount.

    If you have further questions about this, please contact Adobe Customer Support and be ready to divulge the name of this "top level college" so that they can give you accurate information.

    - Dov
     
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    Apr 26, 2008 8:18 PM   in reply to (Chris_Baraniuk)
    Not to knock the school, but a school is a business and any business would not think of losing money on something unless they would see a return. I went to a respected art/film/animation college where it was normal to charge $45,000 per year for education but they didn't give you any deals on anything. Dov is right, just call Adobe.
     
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    Apr 27, 2008 5:11 AM   in reply to (Chris_Baraniuk)
    My school has the same arrangement. Under the terms of the plan, as I understand it, student and faculty purchases are credited toward the volume discounts the school receives for the number of licenses required to equip labs and classrooms. The more students buy the software through the program, the better the price for the school.

    Peter
     
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    Apr 27, 2008 4:24 PM   in reply to (Chris_Baraniuk)
    Thank you Peter for explaining better than me. I'm just a parent that sees a good deal when it is presented to me. There is no need to call Adobe- I can read the license better than most.
     
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    May 4, 2008 5:31 PM   in reply to (Chris_Baraniuk)
    Thanks Chris Baraniuk

    http://www.kobimedya.com
     
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    Jun 23, 2008 6:28 PM   in reply to (Chris_Baraniuk)
    Does it matter where you purchase CS3 Educational or only that you are registered at an accepted educational institution when you buy it?

    I can get retail CS3 Educational online cheaper than my college bookstore.
     
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    Jun 23, 2008 6:46 PM   in reply to (Mark_Swanson)
    Just make sure that the seller is fully authorized.

    Bob
     
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    Jul 3, 2008 5:36 AM   in reply to (Chris_Baraniuk)
    I'm a Tafe College lecturer in Australia and wish to purchase the Adobe Master Suite. The reseller at which i want to purchase from offers 3 versions Master Collection, Master Collection Student, and Master Collection Academic.

    I'm thinking of starting my own design business and want to know wether i'll be doing anything illegal if I buy the Master Suite at Academic price and use it commercially.

    According to http://www.adobe.com/education/purchasing/qualify.html I do qualify to purchase the product at academic price: Full or part time faculty and staff employed by accredited K-12 and higher education institutions. And i can provide the needed information.

    So i was looking at the End User License Agreements (EULA's) for Photoshop and Illustrator etc. and nowhere does it state that I can not use them for commercial use.
    All the EULA's are found here http://www.adobe.com/products/eulas/

    Only in the Macromedia products (Dreamweaver, Studio, Flash etc.) it states
    (f) Education Versions may not be used for, or distributed to any party for, any commercial purpose.

    This website http://kb.adobe.com/selfservice/viewContent.do?externalId=kb402371&sl iceId=2

    says "The Education versions of Adobe products are fully functional and identical to the retail versions, although there might be differences in packaging or marketing."

    "You may purchase upgrades for Educational versions of Adobe products, but there are no educational discounts for upgrades"

    "You may purchase regular upgrades to Education products you already own even after you no longer qualify as an Education customer (for example, students who graduate or instructors who leave the teaching profession)."

    "When you upgrade an Education product, you get a new End User License Agreement (EULA) that overrides the original license agreement and no longer restricts you to educational use."

    Is there a specific EULA for educational products that i cant find on Adobe's EULA page or does the EULA come with the packaging of the product?

    And if i purchase the Master Collection at academic price which is apparently "fully functional and identical to the retail versions" can i use Dreamweaver to make websites and people pay me for that service?

    Is academic pricing just a discount on full version? So i can use it for a graphic design business?

    Anyone's help on this would be greatly appreciated

    Ben
     
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    Jul 3, 2008 7:47 AM   in reply to (Chris_Baraniuk)
    Ben,

    No, in Australia, you are prohibited from using Student or Academic versions for any commerical work.

    See .

    Unfortunately, URLs you are pointing to are the US sites, not those for outside the United States.

    - Dov
     
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    Jul 4, 2008 1:42 AM   in reply to (Chris_Baraniuk)
    For student editions the following page is quite clear: http://www.adobe.com/ap/education/students/studentedition/faq.html

    Commercial use is not allowed, but a student edition can be upgraded to a commercial edition when a new CS is released.

    However, what is the situation with the regular (and more expensive) education versions? Adobe used to have a FAQ about this here: http://www.adobe.com/uk/education/purchasing/faq.html

    But that page is no longer accessible from the main page. Can anyone confirm that what is stated on that page still holds namely that the education versions *can* be used commercially and can also be upgraded?

    Walter
     
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    Aug 28, 2008 6:38 AM   in reply to (Chris_Baraniuk)
    Hi everyone,

    Was there any resolution to this last question? Is the Adobe Student Edition a newer incarnation different from previous educational/academic licenses?

    As Walter mentioned, the Adobe Student Edition FAQ page seems to be at odds with the other information, as it states:

    "Adobe Student Editions are for installation solely on private computers and for non-commercial purposes only."

    I would be truly, truly appreciative if somebody could once and for all help shed some light on this subject for me. I've gotten so many differing and conflicting responses from web queries, EULA readings, and Adobe customer service.

    My long-winded post today is spurred on by the confusing response from Adobe customer service that I received today. It read:

    "With regard to your concern to use Adobe Educational Software for
    commercial purposes, I need to inform you that the educational versions of our software are specially priced for qualifying students and faculty. Even though they are restricted for educational and
    institutional use only, educational versions are fully functional."

    Are the products restricted in terms of who can use them, what qualified users can use them for, or both?

    I'm a student (in North America) and received my CS3 Design Premium through my school over a year ago, but I'll be darned if I know how to tell what license I exactly have. Looking at the DVD case in front of me, it says "Student Licensing." I've read the EULA, which basically says you can use the software if you qualify as an educational end-user. Does that mean you have to qualify when you buy it, or forever on? How do I know if my version different from the above mentioned Adobe Student Edition which does, indeed, restrict commercial use?

    I'm not sure if this will help anybody help me understand, but I do know that a couple hundred of students (both undergrad and graduate) are enrolled in the same Adobe license deal as I am, so I'm guessing that is probably some sort of volume licensing.

    It would be absolutely wondrous to know once and for all that it was OK to use my software for commercial purposes both during school and after graduation, as it seems like a shame for the software to become legally derelict if not upgraded.

    If anybody has any thoughts, it would be fantastic to hear them.

    Dov, you seem to be a beacon of Adobe clarity, so I would love any advice you might have.

    Thanks so much!

    Ryan
     
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    Aug 28, 2008 7:08 AM   in reply to (Chris_Baraniuk)
    Dov has posted here before that in the US you must qualify at the time of purchase for educational pricing, but the license allows you to use the software both for educational purposes while a student, and for commercial purposes while a student and after graduating (or presumably dropping out).

    If you wish to upgrade to the next version you qualify to buy the standard commercial upgrade package at the regular upgrade price, or if still otherwise qualified, you can buy a new educational license for the new product. Educational products are not upgradeable to educational versions, and the license cannot be transferred, though you could at a later time transfer a commercial license obtained as an upgrade from your student version, if you chose to do so.

    Peter
     
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    Aug 28, 2008 7:42 AM   in reply to (Chris_Baraniuk)
    Hey Peter,

    Thanks for your response, I appreciate it.

    That statement in the Adobe Student Edition FAQ was what troubled me:

    "Adobe Student Editions are for installation solely on private computers and for non-commercial purposes only."

    Thinking back a couple of months or so, I think I remember an e-mail announcing the new Adobe Student Edition program, so I'm guessing the program (and its provisions) are not that old.

    Do you think I would I be safe in thinking that my version of CS3 Design Premium (now over a year old) is a separate entity from the Adobe Student Edition?

    Thanks again!

    Ryan
     
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