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Knockout In Illustrator

Feb 20, 2009 5:34 AM

How do i take a line of text and subtract it from another object, in Illustrator?

http://i223.photobucket.com/albums/dd286/freefileinc/photoshop_knockou t.gif
 
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 20, 2009 5:54 AM   in reply to mikeadobe
    In AI 12 (CS2): Pathfinder | Subtract from shape area



    The example above shows three objects -- red and black rectangles and text (from bottom to top). Pathfinder subtract was applied with black rectangle and text selected. Bottom example is a copy with black rectangle displaced. Note that text remains live (editable).

    There are other ways to do this in Illustrator.

    Please state Illustrator version in future posts.
     
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    Feb 20, 2009 6:20 AM   in reply to mikeadobe
    In the following screen capture, I have again two identical sets of three objects as described above. In the bottom copy, I have done nothing more than change the color of the base rectangle.



    AI 14 (CS4) pathfinder buttons behave slightly differently, I've been told. Someone with the newer version will have to confirm the action of the Subtract from shape function.
     
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    Feb 20, 2009 7:52 AM   in reply to mikeadobe
    As I stated in my first post, there are many ways to do this in Illustrator. I find the pathfinder method the easiest, especially if you want to keep the text 'live.'

    If you expand appearance after using subtract from shape area, you end up with outlined text and a compound path -- the same end result as your second method.

    Are you using Pathfinder from the Effect menu or the pathfinder palette (aka panel)? (These are not the same things.) If the former, try the latter. Again, apologies if things are different in AI 14.
     
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    Feb 20, 2009 10:18 AM   in reply to mikeadobe
    >I think palette and panel are the same thing, they just changed the terminology at some point.

    Yes. 'aka' is an abbreviation for 'also known as.' Sorry for the confusion, and damn Adobe (the company, not you) for these silly terminology changes.
     
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