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Qzzzzzzzzzzzz
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Photoshp CS2 - why can't I just cut an image into a circle?

Apr 7, 2009 12:40 PM

Hi,

I could do this with some lousy Microsoft pictureit my kids had years ago - and yet I cannot do it with photoshop.

Have followed several tutorials saying draw the circle - invert, yadda yadda and I just keep getting errors. Only thing I can cut is a rectangle - in my world we call that cropping.

Please advise - super frustrated by a simple task!

Any help would be appreciated.

 
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 7, 2009 12:55 PM   in reply to Qzzzzzzzzzzzz

    Qzzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

     

    Hi,

    I could do this with some lousy Microsoft pictureit my kids had years ago - and yet I cannot do it with photoshop.

    Have followed several tutorials saying draw the circle - invert, yadda yadda and I just keep getting errors. Only thing I can cut is a rectangle - in my world we call that cropping.

    Please advise - super frustrated by a simple task!

    Any help would be appreciated.

    Every image format available to computers must be a rectangle. If you had a miracle program in the past that created circular images, you were being faked. It was making a rectangular image with parts that were transparent.

     

    1. Use the elliptical selection tool and drag the circle you want.


    2. Select>Inverse, then press delete. (You have to inverse to delete the bits you don't want.

     

    3. Go File, save for web and save as a gif, with transparency on, selecting the color of the background as the transparent color. (probably white).

     

    You now have an image that will be as circular as your MS wonder program created.

     
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    Apr 7, 2009 1:22 PM   in reply to Don McCahill

    Don  you forgot to mention that he has first to convert the Backgrount to a layer by dobble clicking on the Background.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 7, 2009 4:13 PM   in reply to Qzzzzzzzzzzzz

    WAIT, PLEASE! and read this before you do anything...

     

    The first, most important question you need to answer is this:

     

    What will you be doing with your circular image?

     

    Will this be for printing, for importing for use in another application (tell us which app) or will it be strictly for viewing on a monitor?

     

    Please answer this question, and then we'll proceed with some specific information you'll need to know to produce best results.

     

    Thanks.

     

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 7, 2009 10:13 PM   in reply to Qzzzzzzzzzzzz

    You should have a circle selection first and then you can use Select>Inverse

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 8, 2009 11:07 AM   in reply to Qzzzzzzzzzzzz

    Since you're clearly not very familiar with Photoshop and professional design procedures, I'll forgive you for not understanding that the questions I asked are of somewhat vital importance.

     

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 10, 2009 11:42 AM   in reply to Qzzzzzzzzzzzz

    For ID or Illy, all you have to do is raise the background layer to a full layer, create the circle, select inverse, hit delete so there is a transparent background. Now save as a .psd file to maintain the transparency and place that file into either app.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 10, 2009 12:08 PM   in reply to Qzzzzzzzzzzzz

    Qzzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:


    I would like to be able to import graphics, cut in varied shapes - right now a circle - and use them in either illustrator, inDesign or both. I will be using the overall design from inDesign or illustrator to print postcards on my own printer.

     

     

    OK! Now, see, your answers make a WORLD of difference.

     

    Since you didn't specify I'm going to assume that your versions of Illustrator and InDesign are contemporary to your version of Photoshop.

     

    That being the case, then both of those applications are perfectly happy working with native .psd files. You can place them in either application and they will "understand" and respect the transparency attributes of the Photoshop file you place in those apps.

     

    Now then, rather than deleting any selections you may make, you will be afforded far more flexibility and editability by turning your selections into a mask. A mask will hide whatever it covers, and make it appear as though the masked part of that layer is transparent, revealing whatever might be on any layers beneath the masked layer. You may have a mask on each layer.

     

    Remember that the default indicator for transparency the whole way through to the "bottom" of a file is Photoshop's gray & white checkerboard pattern. If you see that, you're seeing transparency.

     

    For complete transparency, then, you will want to promote your default Background into an actual, floating layer. You do this by double clicking on its name in the Layers Palette.

     

    Also remember that the default Background color is white, and for many projects it won't need to be promoted to a layer. Why? Well, think about it for a minute: White is the abscence of color when printing; so long as there's nothing composited benath or around your masked object, nothing will print where there that Background white color is displayed, and the medium (let's say, for example, that it's a colored or preprinted sheet of paper) will show through.

     

    Of course, like most things with Photoshop, there are lots of things to learn about the process of masking. And for that, I've gathered together a bunch of links to instructional sources at the thread link below. What you need sounds pretty simple, so for now, you can just scan the links in the thread and read up on basic masking procedures.

     

    Once you've done a little homework and experimentation, feel free to return to this thread and asked more focused, specific questions.

     

    Photoshop Lounge Resource Repository: Advanced Masking and Isolation:

    http://forums.adobe.com/thread/370974?tstart=0

     

    Hope that helps!

     

     

     

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 11, 2009 6:39 AM   in reply to Qzzzzzzzzzzzz

    When you 'select all', then inverse, you are saying to select pixels outside the image and there are none. Hencely the message and you do not need to use 'select all' in the process.

     

    Are you using the elliptical marquee tool that is shown as a circle from the marque flyout menu on the toolbar (normally shows as a square)? As long as you have pixels outside the circular marquee, you should be able to do an inverse selection.

     

    Have you tried 'Shift-Crtl-I' to select the inverse? Did you accidentally deselect the selection?

     

    I can do this no matter what 'image mode' I'm in.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 11, 2009 7:08 AM   in reply to Qzzzzzzzzzzzz

    Well I'm glad you sorted that out, simple error. Now you're on your way to being a pro!

     
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