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Sharpening video in Premiere CS3

Jun 9, 2009 3:25 PM

Hi all,

 

I was just wondering what kind of success you all are having using the sharpening effect in Premiere CS3?

 

It appears that its only useful at very low levels before it starts to create visible artifacts.

 

Are there any procedures,  plugins or standalone apps that do a better job?

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 10, 2009 8:09 AM   in reply to nados

    Sharpening can be a touchy subject. A little can go a long way, and too much is easy to attain.

     

    One workflow that I employ, when visual Sharpening is needed is to first add Neat Video and adjust it accordingly. Afterwards, I'll then use Unsharp Mask, judicially. The reason for this two-step process is that Neat Video reduces the video noise (essentially the "grain" in the image), and then the Unsharp Mask is able to "sharpen" the footage without sharpening the video noise. I think that Neat Video still offers a trial. It used to be time limited only, no watermark, but check this out, as I have owned it for years, and have not seen a trial in that period of time. Render times will be impacted, but on my workstation it's not bad - maybe an extra cup of coffee, or two...

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 10, 2009 11:13 AM   in reply to nados

    Try this:

    copy clip from video 1 and paste it directly above in video 2

    Add the Sharpen effect to the clip in video 2 and set it to about 30 and lower the opacity between 50 and 70 (trial and error)

    You can also do the same with the Unsharpen Mask effect if the former does not give a satisfactory result.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 10, 2009 3:29 PM   in reply to nados

    Unfortunately, too many video cameras seem to have poor manual focus rigs. In the "old days" of cine, one could easily zoom in, set the focus with totally separate control, then zoom out to frame and never have to worry about focus (well, almost never). Now, it's all too bloody easy to jostle something. Give me an old 12-120 Angineaux, or Schneider anyday!

     

    Ann's suggestion might be of most immediate help and keep you from having to download and install a trial, though with out-of-focus footage, there might not be much saving it. If you cannot get good results with her method, then see if the trial still exists.

     

    One tip: set your Program Monitors View to 100%, or even 200% to judge your results. Do not try seeing the corrections with "Fit" - you'll go blind and possibly crazy in the process. Go lightly and experiment.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 10, 2009 7:04 PM   in reply to nados

    Good luck, and please do report on what your experiments unveil. Considering that my method would require the purchase of a plug-in and Ann's is free, it would be great for all of us to know what you found, regarding your footage. I'd always rather recommend a workflow that was free, especially if it was better. Trust me, others will benefit from your problem and your trials.

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 10, 2009 8:26 PM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    Give me an old 12-120 Angineaux, or Schneider anyday!

     

    http://smileys.on-my-web.com/repository/Happy/happy-049.gif

     
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