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Remove Green Screen with Adobe Photoshop Elements

Jul 12, 2009 4:00 PM

Hi,

 

I have setup a Green Screen in my home. I took some pictures of my wife with the Green Screen Background and want to remove the Green Screen and replace with a different background. I was able to do this via the Adobe Premiere Elements 7.0 but need help with the Photoshop Elements.

 

Any help is appreciated.

 

DSC01085.JPG

Sridhar

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 12, 2009 5:23 PM   in reply to sridhar71

    Well, as far as I know, PSElements doesn’t have “Croma Keying” ability...

    Try the “Magic Extractor” and see how you like the result...

    (you might have to clean-up some edges manually)

     

    Regards

    Nolan

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 12, 2009 9:02 PM   in reply to sridhar71

    Sridhar,

    I used the freeware PSE add-on GML Matting to remove the background. This tool extracts an item from a picture and places it on a transparent background.  It works especially well in extracting fine areas such as hair, as you can see in my example:

    http://www.pixentral.com/show.php?picture=1ONLQGu6d8KTj10ii8Y2a6RSPmB5 m

     

    I added the white layer so you can better see the result. In a few small areas where GML Matting did not remove the green, I selected around these areas and applied a Hue/Saturation change where I selected green from the pull-down list and moved the Saturation slider all the way left to remove the green. In a couple tiny areas this didn't work, so I again selected these areas and applied a Hue/Saturation with the pull-down list default of Master and moved the Saturation left to totally remove the color. Since the selected areas included some of the hair and the hair was dark anyway, removing the color was negligable.

     

    Oh yes, I also did some playing around with color correction and levels to brighten her a bit.

     

    If you want I can upload my changes, either the psd or a jpg version.

     

    You can download GML Matting at

    http://research.graphicon.ru/image-processing/gml-matting-6.html

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 13, 2009 5:00 PM   in reply to sridhar71

    The GML filters are somewhat unusual as they appear at the bottom of the "Select" menu instead of under "Filter". I can't say whether they work or not under PSE 7 but that's where you will find them.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 13, 2009 10:01 PM   in reply to sridhar71

    My bad...GML GrowCut shows up under "Select" but GML Matting should show up under "Filter" listed as GML.

     

    When you installed did it have Photoshop Elements 7 as a possible target. If so, did you make sure that version was checked. If it installed in the correct location, it should have added two files to your Plug-Ins folder GMLMatting.8bf and a GMLMatting.ini. If those two items aren't in your Plug-Ins folder try installing it again.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 13, 2009 11:59 PM   in reply to Terri_F

    FWIW, She is really easy to select on that green screen if you use a few tricks. The screen shots are in CS3 my preference but worked with Elements limitations to show you how easy she can be selected without any filters.

     

    My end product doesn't look as good as Mark's though. That's a tough act to follow. Thought I'd post this anyway just in case you couldn't get that filter to work in Photoshop Elements 7,

     

     

    First, make a copy of the image and desaturate it to make it black and white. I prefer using Hue/Saturation from the image menu (CTRL U) and moving desat slider down to -100. Next Invert it (CTRL I), then run levels from the image menu (CTRL L) to push the image towards pure white and black...well close. It should look something like this when these steps are done.

     

    b-and-w-invert-levels300.jpg

     

    Copy this image to a new layer. (Just in case something goes wrong so you don't have to repeat the last steps). Leave the copy in Normal blend mode. Grab your paint brush tool. Set the brush tool's mode to Overlay blend mode. You will use black and white paint to push dark gray to black and light gray to white. When done, it should look something like this:

     

    paint-overlay300.jpg

     

    Not perfect...I did this really fast and was a bit sloppy and didn't get all of my light grays pushed to whites. Probably not a problem for the hair edges but would need to be fixed for face and body areas as this will be a mask to make the selection.

     

    Select mask that was just made and copy it into your clipboard. Select<All; Edit<Copy. Create and adustment layer mask that has a mask. I used the Solid Color Fill Adjustment layer. Alt click the mask of the adjustment layer you created. It will turn the document white. This is because the mask is now the focus. Now paste. Edit<Paste. This will paste the above mask into the adjustment layer mask. Now, either alt click the mask or click on another layer to remove the focus from the mask. You'll use this adjustment layer as a base to a clipping mask. See next paragraph.

     

    The Solid color fill layer (or whatever you picked) with your mask is going to be the base on which your selection will be built. Create a copy of your original image up above this base layer. Now, hold in the alt key and move your curser in the layers pallete to the line separating these two layers. Notice the cursor changes to an odd symbol...a solid ring and a hollow ring with an arrow. Click the palette on the line separating these two layers. (Release alt key when done.) She should now be covering the mask you created. Areas that are white in the adjustment layer mask will show the original image; areas in black in the adjustment layer mask will be transparent. (Areas that contain shades of gray would be semi-transparent...amount based on the gray's brightness value.)

     

    For the green cast on the edges, I removed that by using a Hue/Saturation adjustment layer to remove the green spill over. If you only wanted to effect the girl and not a new background add it to clipping mask. (Same way...alt click the line between her image and the Hue/Saturation layer.)

     

    Not perfect but this is what I came up with based on the above mask:

     

    complete-on-white 300.jpg

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 25, 2011 9:18 AM   in reply to sridhar71

    Hello

    Although this is an old forum post I have found it by searching for a similar solution.

    For such a tool with so many features it does seem strange that it is not an easy thing to do in Photoshop.

    Like you I use green screen in Elements for video editing with good results. I also take a lot of photos for eBay, and (as already suggested) just use the bucket tool with a suitable colour and zoom in to clean up green pixels remaining with the same colour.

     

    But here is another suggestion which is more like true green screening. Anyway this is the way I have done it. . .

     

    I open a jpg with a background I like; use the colour dropper to pick the colour in the area I am going to drop the person photo.

    Switch to the person photo and change the background colour to dropper colour; use the bucket tool to fill the background; crop the photo as required.

    You may still need to zoom in and touch up green pixels around hair.

    You may also have to match the image size to the background image size.

    Save the person image as a jpg.

     

    Go back to background image.  Go to File, Place and select your person.jpg - resizing and placing is possible.

     

    This is my quick example:-

     

    Alps 011.jpg

     
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