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Revive GoLive - Interested Parties Only

Nov 4, 2009 10:04 AM

  Latest reply: sonofmrsnak, Apr 3, 2014 9:37 AM
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 16, 2012 10:19 AM   in reply to STURMKATZE

    There are people on this forum who always feel they need to get in the last word. Best to ignore them.

     

    BTW - Golive 9 will work with Lion.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 16, 2012 1:48 PM   in reply to sonofmrsnak

    I know. Thanks. I had 9 on my old computer, but I wasn't real thrilled. Anyway, it's all a PC environment for me. Well, I could do Mac, but I think it would be too much work for the reward. Maybe not. Still, I have Gl8 working in virtual XP, but it has some hiccups, but ya know, in the last couple years, it had some hanguns in real XP, so I guess it's a moot point :-Þ

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 16, 2012 2:02 PM   in reply to STURMKATZE

    I work all on Mac, though I do have XP installed on a MacBook for testing. Have never found cross-platform working to be easy. Best to have all your files in one place. It's always best to take the path of least resistance :-)

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 18, 2012 2:51 AM   in reply to sonofmrsnak

    sonofmrsnak wrote:

     

    BTW - Golive 9 will work with Lion.

    Are you certain of this?

    I posted that very question, and the one reply I've gotten is from a person who is saying he gets a fatal error message when trying to tun GL9 in Lion.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 18, 2012 3:06 AM   in reply to The Real Thorzdad

    Golive 9 will not work with Lion. Why?

    Lion is a Mac OS

    Golive for Mac never went past CS2 8.0.1

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 18, 2012 3:20 AM   in reply to promotional

    promotional wrote:

    Golive for Mac never went past CS2 8.0.1

    GoLive 9 was made available as a download-only option for Mac users when Adobe switched to Dreamweaver as the web-authoring app in CS3. It's a Universal app.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 18, 2012 3:44 AM   in reply to The Real Thorzdad

    OK if you say so. I wish I had a copy. If it is better than the one I have.... and works  :-)

    I've never come across it.

     

    I love Golive, especially CSS user interface. Dreamweaver is just a mass of tiny boxes everywhere.

     

    Golive is a biit of a pig nowadays though working in CSS as it's not exactly WYSIWYG any more. Dreamweaver 5.5 is far superior for this.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 18, 2012 10:18 AM   in reply to The Real Thorzdad

    The Real Thorzdad wrote:

     

    GoLive 9 was made available as a download-only option for Mac users when Adobe switched to Dreamweaver as the web-authoring app in CS3. It's a Universal app.

    So if GoLive 9 was made available for download, does anyone here have it? Is it legal to share now that it's obsolete?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 18, 2012 10:38 AM   in reply to promotional

    GL9 was, according to most reports, problematic, and had some features removed. Adobe stills owns it so sharing copies is illlegal.

    That being said, it is the only option to run GL on Lion. As mentioned before, I've only seen Windows versions being offered (though illegally on warz sites, etc..). Adobe will not sell you a copy nor will they release it to the public domain.

     

    Adobe blew it for me by releasing a pricey 5.5 so close to the 5 I had just purchased.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 18, 2012 10:51 AM   in reply to sonofmrsnak

    FWIW, I have GL9 running in Snow Leopard. I don't find it buggy or problematic at all. I was using GL CS1 before that, and I don't find GL9 lacking in the least, compared to that. And, despite its age, it's far-and-away better than Dreamweaver CS5. About the only feature missing in GL9 that affected me was the lack of a live preview mode. But, that's not a biggie and easily worked-around.

     

    GL9 is probably the biggest thing keeping me from migrating to Lion. If it doesn't work in Lion, I'm going to have to use Dreamweaver. And I think I'd rather chew broken glass.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 18, 2012 11:02 AM   in reply to The Real Thorzdad

    The Real Thorzdad wrote:

     

    ...If it doesn't work in Lion, I'm going to have to use Dreamweaver....

    Why do you assume that your only option is DW?

     

    Adobe products are not required for web design.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 18, 2012 11:17 AM   in reply to Marian Driscoll

    It's a type of environment that I'm very comfortable with. Plus, I already have CS5, so Dreamweaver is already there. I'm more than willing to look at other options that would give me a similar environment, but I'd rather not have to purchase anything else at this point. Web work is more of a side-line for me.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 18, 2012 3:14 PM   in reply to LRK 2

    I own GoLive 9.  I have been using GoLive since cyberstudio.  GoLive 9 was the most backwards app I have ever purchased.  In other words, it was actually worse than version 1. and that is hard to do.  So many problems with how it operates and tons of bugs.  It is SO amazing to me to see a company so out of touch with their customers.  We will remember this time when we discuss how they went under.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 20, 2012 7:07 PM   in reply to LRK 2

    Running Golive CS2 in "Windows XP Mode" doesn't work based on certain variables, if they are slightly altered. The other common option, "Windows Virtual PC" is full of problems related to its limitations. One, you cannot use preview mode, because it requires an absolute path to create a temp file, therefore it doesn't work. You can install Google Chrome and click on the browser for a preview as an alternative. Windows Virtual PC is inheritedly slow as well. It hogs Windows Vista and 7 resources, as it would, however the throughput is not fluid for lack of architecture, therefore you end up with a slow, shaky, and unstable results. You can only use one USB device to add applications or update the virtual XP environment... the limitations are extensive.

     

    I personally use "VMware Workstation 8" ($199 USD), which targets resource heavy applications that take RAM and network paths seriously. GoLive CS2 works wonderfully within it. Unity Mode allows you to float XP Windows successively in Windows 7. If you MUST upgrade to Windows 7, and MUST have GoLive CS2, this is really the only option.

     

    I have downloaded and tried every WYSIWYG editor, to compare possibilities with Golive and none exist. GoLive is an application of its own dominion.

     

    I work in Dreamweaver CS5 when I have to, and it does offer automation, like replacing the defunct SWF embed code with script rewrites that are mandatory for Internet Explorer 9 and browser backward compatibility. But try to click a table cell to modify it... you can't. Try to visually alter many of html elements in layout mode... you can't. I seriously, passionately dislike Dreamweaver for a list of reasons I would imagine has already been enumerated. It is an application optimized for developers, not for designers.

     

    Yes, it would take an Adobe team to keep GoLive up to speed, but Adobe is wealthy beyond measure, fully able to provide ongoing support if they chose to care. I don't even want additional widgets to bloat GoLive, I just want it to work in Windows 7 64-bit. I have spent $1,000’s over the years in support of Adobe, by purchases for myself and clients, and they don’t care that a minion of Adobe GoLive users earnestly want their beloved application.

     

    "Adobe doesn't care about its customers"... which I agree is the most accurate post on this thread.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 21, 2012 8:12 AM   in reply to LRK 2

    Linda,

    For me, GoLive is a non-issue. It's my software of choice and I think it's the best out there. But I start in Photoshop and I can take that design, slice up the images and put the whole thing together using a text pad or something. I don't need GoLive, it just makes my life easier.

     

    What I would suggest to you is this - most people have the need for some sort of content management system anyway. I would really get familiar with a program like Joomla. Then you could look through litterally thousands of templates that exist and find something that is close to what suits your needs, replace all of the images with images that you create and then tweak the CSS to polish it off. This way here, you would never have the need for an editor. I still have the need for it (as I said - to make my life easier) to make changes to the extensions available for Joomla. I customize about 90% of all of the components, modules and plugins that are out there to suit my needs. But most of these will work right out of the box for most people. Meaning that the chances of you needing to modify the code is slim. And if you do, you just hire a programmer to get that job done and include it in your budget.

     

    Taking this advice will probably enable you to continue this type of work and eliminate the need to use GoLive if it's just not possible moving forward.

     

    Because of the amount of web work that I do, I am in GoLive every day. I know eventually I will have to upgrade to Lion and it will go away. But hopefully, someone will be smart enough to come out with a program that is similar. My guess is they won't because of the growing amount of templates out there and laziness of people to do everything from scratch. Unfortunately, we are a dying breed. But in the corporate world - there is still much need for people like me and there is plenty of money to be spent too. Most of the websites we work on are $40k and up.

     

    But what I have laid out for you is a great alternative to the way things use to get done and hopefully, it is a solution for you to satisfy your clients.

     

    Keep us posted.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 21, 2012 8:49 AM   in reply to LRK 2

    Don't get me wrong. This is not a solution for only the big websites. I was just saying that there are still ways for people like me to make a living at this (even though I won't be doing it much longer). This solution is specifically perfect for low-budget websites. As you buy a template, you are looking for a site that has been built that has the right structure to it (a lot of sites have a similar structure to it). The only thing you would change is the graphics and then tweak the CSS for the positioning, colors, fonts and such.

     

    So my solution would still work perfectly for you. If you have a client with a $5,000 budget, you don't want to be spending countless hours on the interface design. This cures that for you

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 21, 2012 10:00 AM   in reply to LRK 2
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 21, 2012 10:25 AM   in reply to LRK 2

    If you have customers that want to continue with you then you have a few

    options:

     

    All web sites are now in maintenance mode- the design work has been

    done, you could keep them that way with a computer running GoLive software.

     

    First immediately announce that you are raising your rates (and notify

    all the clients that want you to continue with their web sites) so that

    you are not giving away your time and talents. If they are sorry to see

    you go because you are good and not because you are just the cheapest...

    you will find out. With these higher rates you maybe able to invest in

    the time and effort to find software or a content management package

    like Drupal, Joomla, etc. for any new or make-over work that comes your

    way. If you really hate the work and do want to get out completely you

    can drive away business really easy with 10 to 15 times the rate you

    charge ($5000 to $10,000 estimates on a basic simple 2 or 3 page web site).

     

    Consider outsourcing some of the work, if it is more than just a

    maintenance of the existing web site and they want major changes or

    make-over see about becoming in a sense the project manager and have a

    partner(s) that do the actual coding make-over or work. You become the

    go between and bill for the time you and the customer and you win.

     

    What ever you do do not just keep the status quo of you complaining that

    you are not getting paid enough for the work required.

     

    Richard Sheasley

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 21, 2012 10:34 AM   in reply to RSheasley

    Agree with Richard.

    Never give your time away. Your talents and your time is worth something. Charge what you are worth or it's not worth doing the work.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 21, 2012 10:51 AM   in reply to Michael M. Kadrie

    I think the irony here is that, over time, software is supposed to get better.

     

    It's stunning that there still is not a direct competitor for Dreamweaver. We all lose.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 21, 2012 6:05 PM   in reply to Inndesign

    Inndesign wrote:

     

    ...I personally use "VMware Workstation 8" ($199 USD), which targets resource heavy applications that take RAM and network paths seriously...

    There's quite a bit wrong with that statement but I'll just address the costly part. VMware Player (which will operate much like the workstation edition) is available for free.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 21, 2012 6:28 PM   in reply to LRK 2

    LRK 2 wrote:

     

    ...It will take time to learn Joomla, which I don't have right now… but you have me interested in making the attempt. I could possibly attempt the next website in February and learn to use Joomla as I go...

    That is good to hear after 2 years.

    LRK 2 wrote:

     

    ...from what I understand, the future of the web might end up being in the hands of open source apps such a Joomla and Drupal...

    Imagine where we'd all be if we picked up on Joomla or some CMS 2 years ago when we discussed this instead of petitioning to bring a corpse back to life. Some of the earliest posts in this multi-year discussion warned that a futile effort to revive GoLive would distract from progressing as a web designer. You would have had plenty of time to learn Joomla (or any other CMS) if you were not distracted. I hope you find new energy in web design by getting past futile distractions and looking to the future.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 23, 2012 6:14 PM   in reply to LRK 2

    I wish someoen would pay me crazy money to do a website. Oh well, all the people I do stuff for are poor and need help. Story o' me life.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 23, 2012 7:05 PM   in reply to Marian Driscoll

    Wrong for you is not wrong for others, Marian. Ipso Facto statements like that reveals much about a person who is quick to judge without facts or knowledge.

     

    VMware Workstation has features useful for product development that no other VMware product has such as integration with MS Visual Studio or VM teams, where the network between virtual machines in the team can be specified, including bandwidth and packet loss. VMware Workstation usually gets the new virtual hardware releases first and supports the widest guest OS range. It is optimized for interactive use and has some Direct3D (DirectX 9) and OpenGL capabilities.

     

    VMware Player is a stripped-down version of workstation, no cloning, no multi-level snapshot trees, no teams, etc. While workstation allows 64GB of allocated RAM, Player 4 is limited 32GB last I knew. Player runs a virtual instance, but can't create the virtual machine. Workstation allows for the creation and administration of virtual machines. Workstation allows you to use multiple screens on the virtual machine. Player only allows single screen. Workstation is targeting power users and developers; VMware even provides some hooks for using a debugger on the host to debug code in the Workstation.

     

    I am not only a html editor of 17 years, but a developer in Zend PHP, CakePHP, Ajax, MS Visual Studio, with a VM loaded Mac OS X Lion, and Linux Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5. So like I said, for some users who have limited skill sets, Player is sufficient, but for others Workstation is not optional.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 23, 2012 7:04 PM   in reply to STURMKATZE

    I wouldn't sweat it. The people that are doing the big bux websites are not doing it alone, and probably part of the team hired to do it.

     

    I've designed and project-managed large sites, but my personal cut was modestly proportionate

     

    One person can only do so much, and when you factor in programming, the costs can go up if you hire a company to help out.

    I've also found it extremely hard to find reliable freelance designers and programmers to save company overhead. Can't tell you how many people from guru.com flake on projects - all at various stages. The work ethic of so many is terrible these days.

     

    I prefer the clients who allow us to work at our hourly rate and like to keep things simple. You can find cheap website creation everywhere these days, so it's important to find clients who value working with people who not only will be around tomorrow and have the skills, but also close to the same time zone and are fluent native speakers in the client's language.

     

    We generally have more work than we can handle.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 23, 2012 7:22 PM   in reply to sonofmrsnak

    Not true for me (always). We have two other designers that will help contribute ideas (in other words, we usually present 3 concepts to a client). But I am the only one doing the work and building the website. Occasionally we have the need for a programmer that knows a little more than me, but most websites - I'm the man - from soup to nuts.

     

    But I'm probably the exception and not the rule.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 24, 2012 7:50 AM   in reply to Inndesign

    Inndesign wrote:

     

    ...Ipso Facto statements like that reveals much about a person who is quick to judge without facts or knowledge...

     

    Lighten up. Your comment about $199 would scare other users to think that they have to pay that just to run GL. You can run GL in VMware Player for free. There is no concern about "resource heavy applications that take RAM and network paths seriously". GoLive runs fine in VMware Player.

     

    Inndesign wrote:

     

    ...Player runs a virtual instance, but can't create the virtual machine...

    Please do not make ipso facto statements with your own limited skill set.

    player.png

     

    Inndesign wrote:

     

    ...So like I said, for some users who have limited skill sets, Player is sufficient...

    Eh... You never said that.

     

    The difference you draw between Workstation and Player does not apply to a GoLive user. If you need the level of resources offered by Workstation to run GoLive, you must be using GoLive incorrectly. GoLive was not designed for, nor requires, that much RAM. That is nice that you think you have sufficient experience. I'm just pointing out that you apparently have no experience with Player and have no need to scare people into paying $199 to keep running GoLive. Seriously, lighten up.

     

    Inndesign wrote:

     

    ... this is really the only option.

    Are you able to recognize the silliness of criticizing me for an ipso facto statement when you foolishly believe that Workstation is really the only option? You haven't even bothered to discuss VirtualBox.

     

    Oy! We're here to discuss possibilities; not to scare people into wasting money on unnecessary software.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 24, 2012 3:34 PM   in reply to LRK 2

    yes and why:

    golive was so intuitive with its simple to use toolbar and great interchange between photoshop, illustrator, with an indesign ease of page design.

    have dreamweaver and some other web softwares, but nothing beats golive.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 28, 2012 10:46 AM   in reply to Guy Jeff

    Hi,

     

    I'm gald to see this current golive forum. I'm one of those who has stranded sites. I struggled with DW to get them down. But working with DW is so tedious that I just don't maintain my vintage sites anymore. And I like the old look before everything became the same on the web.

     

    I'm writing to ask what "workstation" might be the best for someone who plans to use the most stable golive version on a mac. I plan to assemble a vintage machine and software. Can a old G4 on Tiger run golive 5? I forget what the last working set up was. I'm looking for the formula for the perfect legacy system set up.

     

    Any leads? I thank you in advance.

     

    Nik Mills of nikmills.com and cwrightmills.org

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 28, 2012 11:57 AM   in reply to myungkc

    Wow, GL5 goes way back. 8 (CS2) was the last real version (there was the failed 9). Tiger on a G4 should be perfect for it as I seem to recall running it on that model & OS originally. I'm still using GL8 everyday with Snow Leopard and it works great.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 5, 2012 5:26 AM   in reply to LRK 2

    YES.

     

    Like many designers, I've migrated to Dreamweaver like a good little Adobe customer.  But I've found it lacking for certain things at which GoLive excelled.  Which is why I continue to use GoLive from time to time, even long after its demise.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Calculating status...
    Aug 1, 2012 12:03 PM   in reply to rumblestrip

    I'm a Designer, I'm a Web Developper and I'm an Art Director. I still use Golive all the time and for all the different needs in web development. On my Mac (OS X 10.8.) Dreamweaver is installed but never used... Never.

    Anyone who has ever had anything to do with user interface design would understand why - after using the two softwares for a while.

     

    This is not a "Golive is good for designers" issue. A good user interface is better for everyone. For designers and developpers... everyone.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 2, 2012 7:46 AM   in reply to LRK 2

    I would sell my children for a revived GoLive, well perhaps I wouldn't - but I would be prepared to pay a premium for it.

     
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    Calculating status...
    Aug 2, 2012 8:41 AM   in reply to Ouzones

    Always with my three Golive licenses, me too!

    A DW legal license is installed next, looked and closed! An incomprehensible nightmare.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 2, 2012 9:43 AM   in reply to salochin48

    LOL! If I had children, I might, too... ;-)

     

    Seriously GL8 is still working fine on Snow Leopard, but i sure wish I could figure a way to port it to Lion. Will probably keep an SL machine whenever I upgrade to another machine.

    GL is even so much better with CSS

     

    If only I could find a copy of GL9, despite its problems. Would do me just fine.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 2, 2012 10:13 AM   in reply to ttlan@free.fr

    Not that I'm an advocate for Dreamweaver, but I know people who use it with

    great success. Maybe you need to give it more than just a quick look.

     
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