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ntaaak
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dimension tool plugin necessary for Illustrator ?

Nov 14, 2009 3:08 AM

Hello,

unfortunatley my company bought CS4, but a few employees also sometimes need  to add dimensions to drawings similar like in CAD software for engineer drawings possible.

But it looks like that it is NOT working with Illustrator CS4. (although written in Wikipedia, that illustrator closes gap between CAD and pixel basing software.)

 

Is there any possibility to install plugin for Illustrator or is Illustrator having such tool ?

 

 

Thanks for helping !

Jan

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 14, 2009 3:15 AM   in reply to ntaaak

    Jan,

     

    I am afraid, the answer is yes, no. You may look for it here: https://www.hotdoor.com/

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 14, 2009 4:32 AM   in reply to ntaaak

    ntaaak wrote:

     

     

     

    It is little unbelievable that Adobe, eliminated dimension tool from Illustrator. Why ?

     

    Did my company buy the wrong software ?

    Is there any other software from adope, which is able to work on .jpg picture and using dimensioning, too ?

     

    Br,

    Jan

    Illustrator is an illustration program it has support for CAD import nd export but it is a vector based illustration program most of the contributors here no little about CAD programs.

     

    But it is not a CAD or Technical Drawing program. You may find that there are other programs that are more suited for your purposes.

     

    I would like t say something about the idea that a few hundred dollars would be a barrier for company that sounds like it uses this all the time and produces profit as well. I am an individual and if I needed this plug in once i would purchase it and not flinch I would still make profit and i am cetain your company would as well.

     

    It surprises me that everyone complains about a few hundred dollars.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 14, 2009 6:01 AM   in reply to ntaaak

    I have an AI Javascript that I built for my own convenience, which creates simple linear dimension callouts, as described here.

     

     

    It is dependendent upon two Graphic Styles and one Paragraph Style which can be added to your documents (or templates) by copying / pasting from the .ai file that is included in the download .zip. However...

     

    It is little unbelievable that Adobe, eliminated dimension tool from Illustrator. Why ?

    Illustrator never had dimension tools.

     

    although written in Wikipedia, that illustrator closes gap between CAD and pixel basing software

     

    Whomever wrote that should be horse-whipped. (Or worse, forced to do techish commercial drawing with Illustrator in a roomful of others who are using either Canvas or CorelDraw.) That is probably the worst mis-characterization of what Illustrator is that I have ever heard.

     

    Did my company buy the wrong software ?

    Probably. If dimension tools and a few other very common features necessary for techish illustration are a frequent need, absolutely. Illustrator not only lacks ordinary dimension tools, it also lacks:

     

    • Reliable snaps.
    • User-defined drawing scales.
    • Connector lines.
    • Callout objects.
    • Live shape primitives (rectangles, polygons, ellipses, arcs) with geometric parameters (corner radii, etc.) that can be adjusted after creation.
    • Proper corner rounding / chamfering commands.
    • Any feature assist for mechanically corrrect perspective construction.

     

    Is there any other software from adope, which is able to work on .jpg picture and using dimensioning, too ?

     

    JPEG is just a lossy compression format for raster images. I don't know what it, in particular, would have to do with what you have described so far (using a mainstream drawing program to make attractive commercial illustration based on line work exported from CAD software).

     

    But unlike most of its direct competitors these days, Illustrator does not provide any features (other than the ability to apply Photoshop filters) for actually editing raster images. It can import a raster image (JPEG or other) and manipulate it as an object (rotate it, scale it, mask it, etc.). But there are no pixel-editing features.

     

    You have not very well described what your company's needs are. But just given your mention of dimension tools as being important and your need for something to "bridge" between working product drawings and commercial product illustration, I dare say you would be far better off with Canvas, Corel Draw, or Corel Designer.

     

    Unlike its competitors, Illustrator has always treated anything the least bit "techish" as if it's something to fear. It's competitors embrace it as what it is: a huge segment of the overall mainstream commercial illustration world. And it isn't just this seeming "technical" vs. "paper doily" aversion. Much of it is simply the fact that Illustrator has never kept up with its competitors in straighforward, no-nonsense path drawing features. Illustrator has always sat too fat-and-lazy on its Adobe label for market share.

     

    People (including myself) do technical/commercial illustration in Illustrator all the time. Most commerical product illustration is of that nature. But in doing so, they constantly employ tedious, cumbersome, and time-wasteful workarounds for the pathetically weak feature set of Illustrator--or they buy add-ons which cost half what they paid for Illustrator all over again. (I've never understood that mindset. No matter how well-done the plug-in, it's never as cleanly-integrated with the overall program as built-in features; and you have to put up with everything that goes along with mission-critical dependency upon add-ons from small third-party providers.)

     

    JET

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 14, 2009 5:48 AM   in reply to ntaaak
    But it is not a...Technical Drawing program.

     

    It's not?

     

    So you're not supposed to draw mechanically-correct product renderings with Illustrator?

     

    You're not supposed to draw cars, motorcyles, airplanes, boats, water faucets, furniture, parts explosions, cutaways, assembly instructions, tennis shoes, clothing, etc., etc., etc. with Illustrator?

     

    What are you then supposed to illustrate with a program called Illustrator? Just amateurish "logos" and loosey-goosey, artsy-tartsy paper doilies?

     

    Users (and Adobe) need to get off this idiotic "it's not a CAD program" knee-jerk defensive reaction. Take a look at what proficient illustrators use the program for. You'll find as many mechanically-correct product renderings as anything else. Are you only supposed to be able to do those things by tracing a photo?

     

    Illustrator is supposed to be a mainstream COMMERCIAL ILLUSTRATION program. Technical rendering is a very large segment of that term.

     

    JET

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 14, 2009 5:54 AM   in reply to ntaaak
    If I buy a car, and want to have special features like air coonditioning, but tha would cost same like the car.

     

    No, you of course do pay more for a car with air conditioning than for a car without air conditioning. But your analogy is spot-on, nonetheless.

     

    Nowadays, almost everyone is assumed to need air conditioning in a car. The manufacturers have long recognized that. So new cars without air conditioning have become the exception to the rule. And car purchasers do, of course, pay for that feature as embedded in the purchase price.

     

    But no car manufacturer requires the new car purchaser to go to a small local A/C shop and have some hack-job done in order to attach some third-party air conditioner hanging from under the dash of their new car. You certainly can do that, of course, if you were short-sighted enough to actually buy a new car without A/C when you knew you needed it. But there will certainly be trade-offs involved if you go that route. You will end up paying more overall, and you will not be as satisfied as if you had bought a car with the A/C properly integrated into the design.

     

    I absolutely GUARANTEE you this:

     

    Some of the VERY SAME people from whom you will hear the worn-out "Illustrator's not a CAD program....It doesn't need dimensions tools or user-defined drawing scales", just scant months ago were vehemently arguing "Illustrator's not a page-layout program....It doesn't need more than one page per document."

     

    Some of those VERY SAME Illustrator-can-do-no-wrong religious devotees now think Illustrator's decades-overdue multi-page capability is "innovative" and "brilliant."

     

    The very same ridiculous sequence will repeat itself if Illustrator ever does catch up (however doubtful) with the rest of the mainstream 2D drawing software world in such ordinary features as dimension tools, shape primitives, user-defined scales, isometric grids, etc., etc, etc.

     

    The bizarre thing is this: Adobe charges more for a car without air conditioning (or push-button windows, or power seat adjustment, or windshield wipers) than every other builder who has included those features as matters-of-course for decades. And Adobe's customers pay it, and then strut around proudly proclaiming their choice of the "leading" illustration software.

     

    JET

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 14, 2009 6:07 AM   in reply to JETalmage

    JETalmage wrote:

     

    <snipped>

    The bizarre thing is this: Adobe charges more for a car without air conditioning (or push-button windows, or power seat adjustment, or windshield wipers) than every other builder who has included those features as matters-of-course for decades. And Adobe's customers pay it, and then strut around proudly proclaiming their choice of the "leading" illustration software.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 14, 2009 7:56 AM   in reply to ntaaak

    You wouldn't want to dimension JPEG files - at least I wouldn't want to. They aren't vector. I am old school CAD - I do most of my work in CAD, including dimensioning, then I either DXFOUT from CAD, or use Acrobat Professional and PDF out at 1:1 scale from CAD. I do the rest of my line width / linestyle / line color, etc etc in Illustrator.

     

    A good place to start if you need dimensioning in CAD BEFORE bringing into Illustrator is Solid Edge Free 2D:

     

    http://www.plm.automation.siemens.com/en_us/products/velocity/solidedg e/free2d/index.shtml

     

    The program is free. Instead of getting JPEG files, have your provider get you DXF files. Illustrator has a slight problem bringing in DXF files from CAD at 1:1 scale, but it can be addressed by re-scaling in Illustrator if you need exact numbers.

     

    If you are interested and need some help getting started with Solid Edge, email me at:

     

    ralph@dyeline.com

     

    Ralph

    http://www.dyeline.com

     
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