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FunkyMac
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CS3 not opening .CR2 files

Aug 2, 2010 10:58 AM

I can't get either Photoshop or Bridge to recognize/open .cr2 files. I have Camera Raw pug-in 4.6 installed, fully updated CS3, Snow Leopard 10.6.4 and the pictures are taken with an EOS 7D. Can't get my head around what's going on here. The funny thing is that in Bridge pref the .cr2 format was listed as supported.

 

Anybody got a clue?

 

Best regards,

Jan

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 2, 2010 11:43 AM   in reply to FunkyMac

    Each model camera needs to be specifically supported in Camera RAW, and Adobe only updates the Camera RAW series for the current version of Photoshop, which was CS4 when the 7D came out.

     

    There are several things you can do:

     

    Convert the CR2 files to DNG using the current version of the DNG Converter, which is free.  DNG files will open in older versions of ACR.

     

    Upgrade from CS3 to CS5 to get the latest ACR which will support the newer cameras.

     

    Get Elements 8 (or 9 in another month or two) which will support a new enough ACR but only can process one image at a time.

     

    For about the same price as a Photoshop upgrade, you can buy Lightroom 3 and have the newest RAW engine but still be able to do Edit In Photoshop for images that need extra work.  LR upgrades are much cheaper than Photoshop upgrades.

     

     

    In my opinion, the newer processing of the ACR 6.1 and LR 3 RAW engines make an upgrade to CS5 or LR3 worth the price.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 2, 2010 1:21 PM   in reply to FunkyMac

    Not quite sure what scenario you are describing with grayed-out images, but the DNG Converter is a stand-alone program that operates only on an entire folder of images at a time, so you should click the Select button on a folder, not an image.

     

    The latest DNG Converter is available using the drop-down list at the top of the main Adobe Updates page:

    http://www.adobe.com/downloads/updates/

     

    In the Converter preferences, you may need to set the camera-raw compatibility to something like ACR 4.6 rather than the newer versions on the list, but I'm not entirely sure if this is necessary, so you could try it once, without changing the setting, and if those DNGs don't work in Bridge/CS3 then delete them all and modify the compatibility setting.

     

    There is also the choice whether to embed the original RAW data so it can be extracted later, or not.  Since this may be an interim process, you probably want to keep your original RAWs around, anyway, rather than embedding the data and deleting the CR2 files, entirely.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 2, 2010 4:31 PM   in reply to FunkyMac

    I can only speak to what happens on Windows...

     

    In the current 6.1 version of the DNG Converter, the first item in Preferences is Compatibility and is in terms of Camera RAW version, where 5.6 is the newest version where compatibility changed.

     

    What version of the DNG Converter are you running?  It should be 6.1.something.

     

    If you are using 6.1 and can't get things to work, then upload one of the offending files to www.YouSendIt.com and post the download link to it.  If you have not used YouSendIt, before, while you have to register, it is free, and you can just put your own e-mail in both the From and To so you'll get the link, yourself.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 4, 2010 2:47 PM   in reply to ssprengel

    Hello,

     

    My version of Photoshop CS3 will open CR2 files that were taken by my Canon XTi, but it will not open CR2 files taken by my new Canon T2i.

     

    Wouldn't these files be the same format?  Are all CR2 files the same? Any help would be appreciated.  I would prefer not to upgrade my photoshop at this time.

     
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  • Noel Carboni
    23,524 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 4, 2010 6:47 PM   in reply to zane441
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    zane441 wrote:


    Are all CR2 files the same?

     

    Nope.  Quite the opposite.  No two are alike.

     

    You'll need to check the Release Notes for the latest Camera Raw release for your version of Photoshop (which would be ACR 4.6).  If your camera is not supported (and it will not be if the T2i is newer than late 2008), you'll need to either get a new version of Photoshop to support it (for direct File-Open capability), or use the free Adobe DNG converter (for conversion then File-Open capability).

     

    http://www.adobe.com/support/downloads/product.jsp?product=106&platfor m=Windows

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 17, 2012 6:43 AM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    What a crock of CS. So now, in order to use my newer Canon Ti2 I have to upgrade to CS5? Why in the world would Adobe not support CS3 and CS4 for newer cameras? I own 11 CS licenses, a few premium versions, up to and including CS4 and I see no advantage to upgrading to CS5, in fact for most purposes CS3 works best for my users. Adobe has continued to degrade the CS family while making so called advanced improvements. I'm disgusted! Shame on you Adobe for not supporting long-time loyal customers. Time to reconsider Aperture.

     
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  • Noel Carboni
    23,524 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 17, 2012 9:35 AM   in reply to bigusmacus

    bigusmacus wrote:

     

    So now, in order to use my newer Canon Ti2 I have to upgrade to CS5? Why in the world would Adobe not support CS3 and CS4 for newer cameras?

     

    Did you read what was written above?  Adobe DOES provide free support for newer cameras - you just have to use the free DNG converter on your raw files to prepare them for opening by your outdated versions of Photoshop. 

     

    You have to upgrade to get direct "File Open" support with your CR2 files, and along with that convenience you get a higher quality conversion than what you got with your older Photoshop versions.

     

    bigusmacus wrote:

     

    What a crock of CS.
    ...
    Why in the world would Adobe not support CS3 and CS4 for newer cameras?

     

    Even if you didn't know about the DNG converter, you're seriously asking this?   Canon gets your money for a new camera, but Adobe shouldn't get your money for new software?

     

    I assume you paid only $199 for the upgrade to the Canon T2i since you already had a Canon.

     

    Oh, and did you ask Canon why they don't just retrofit older bodies for free instead of having you buy a whole new one?

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 17, 2012 9:35 AM   in reply to bigusmacus

    bigusmacus wrote:

     

    So now, in order to use my newer Canon Ti2 I have to upgrade to CS5?

     

    No...I guess you didn't understand....in order to open a recently made camera's raw file, in an application from years ago, you'll have to download and use the FREE utility called DNG Converter and convert your modern raw files to DNG so that can open them in older software.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 17, 2012 10:38 AM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    Hi there.

     

    I did read "the above" and I do understand and I did download the free DNG converter. It's actually in the "goodies" folder of the premium CS versions as well. I typically will shoot 500-600 photos per session. Now I will have to convert those 25MB files, 500 or more, before we can start to work on them. Meanwhile I have employees and clients waiting. Time is money, right? Isn't that what Adobe thinks? That's what my customers think, and I don't like to keep them waiting. I'm Adobe's customer. Why wouldn't Adobe simply make Camera Raw compatible with earlier versions of CS? Can you give me a real clear and logical reason why? After customers like myself have spent tens of thousands of dollars on Adobe software over the past 20 years, made the company very rich, why should I be even slightly inconvenienced because Adobe doesn't want to support earlier versions of their software when new cameras come out?

     

    And by the way, I do not consider CS3 nor CS4 as "outdated" just because Adobe had to come out with a new and improved version at an update cost of $399 or more.

     

    Camera hardware is a different story. When we buy new ones the new ones are usually better, and cost less. Cameras can last quite a few years, and how much better can they get? Most of our work doesn't require more than 10 or 12 MP if even that, so if the cameras didn't get better, that would be okay, and I wouldn't want to have to buy something better and pay more money for it if I didn't need it. Quite frankly, I don't like CS4 as much as CS3, so where is the value in upgrading every year or two or so? Huh? Where will it end? When will the program finally be perfect and not need to be improved?

     

    I assume you paid only $199 for the upgrade to the Canon T2i since you already had a Canon.

    $199 for an upgrade to CS4 Design Premium? Show me where.

     

     

    Oh, and did you ask Canon why they don't just retrofit older bodies for free instead of having you buy a whole new one?

    We resell the cameras, which in fact hold their value a lot better than Adobe software.

     

    And by the way, there's a lot of people out there on a lot of different forums asking the same question, and they too are annoyed. And they are "seriously asking this."

     

    Alright, so I'm making too big of a deal out of having to install DNG Converter on all our machines and take the extra time to convert the RAW files. Whine, whine. But I see it as typical of our world today, and it is annoying. Always newer, bigger, better, faster.

     

    Thanks for your reply.

     

    Alan

     
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  • Noel Carboni
    23,524 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 17, 2012 11:43 AM   in reply to bigusmacus

    I was talking about the price to upgrade Photoshop because that's all that's needed to convert raw files.  Yes, things do get a bit more complicated once you've partaken in the discount you get for buying the entire suite, because you can't upgrade just individual apps.  However, what's the entire suite upgrade price?  A whole $399?  Do you get within $399 of your original purchase price when you sell a used camera body that cost $2K new?

     

    It would be nice if Adobe went to effort at their expense to add new camera support into older versions, but they ARE in business to make money, and there reasonably has to be a cutoff somewhere.  They have simply chosen to cut it off at the release of each new version, no doubt because that greatly simplifies (reduces the cost of) the engineering.  And we really don't get any say in it.  Apparently they're still making sales, so the products have the value to justify the prices and policies.

     

    Your comment that new cameras are better implied that Adobe's new versions are not better.  Why do you think that's the case?  Frankly, just the improvements between raw development process PV2003 and PV2010 can arguably match the improvements from upgrading to a newer generation camera body.  And that doesn't count the additional utility of things like Content Aware Fill, or the other new things you'd get in the other apps in CS5.5.

     

    I suppose it's not unexpected that people want more for less - I thought as you do once - but it's clear that Adobe is in the software business to make money, just as the camera companies are in the hardware business to make money, and just as we're in our businesses to make money.

     

    Oh, and by the way, don't let the upgrade pricing policy changes for CS6 take you by surprise...  They're becoming more restrictive, and you may no longer be able to upgrade your older versions in the ways you thought you could.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 17, 2012 12:27 PM   in reply to bigusmacus

    bigusmacus wrote:

     

    I'm Adobe's customer. Why wouldn't Adobe simply make Camera Raw compatible with earlier versions of CS? Can you give me a real clear and logical reason why?

     

    Because that's not the way software is developed...the code for CS3 and CS4 is "old" meaning Adobe no longer is writing that code. The code base has been altered/changed by later versions. The SDK (software development kit) for Photoshop has changed...plug-ins that work for Photoshop CS5/5.5 are using the current SDK. Older versions of Photoshop have an older and in some cases, incompatible SDK.

     

    For example on the Mac, Photoshop CS5 requires that the plug-in be written in Apple's Cocoa API. Camera Raw 5 required a major update to be able to run in Cocoa...retrofitting Camera Raw 5 to run in a PPC platform (supported by CS3 but not supported by CS5) would be difficult. As a result of the engineering challenges of backwards compatibility Adobe has the policy of only updating currently shipping software to current customers. Truth be told, you are not a current customer...you are a former customer. Having Adobe spend R&D on supporting former customers would take resources away from supporting current customers. As a current customer, I wouldn't like that.

     

    Really, I think you have a problem of expectations...you buy a brand new camera that wasn't even around when you bought your software and you expect after several years that Adobe will re-engineer the old software for compatibility with your new camera? That's not a reasonable expectation. Since you don't really understand software development–as most people don't–I do as I develop plug-ins, I understand why you and many people just assume that Adobe is refusing to update old software as some ploy to make you upgrade your software. Yes, there is an element of that, but there are technical reasons why updating software for backwards compatibility isn't a good business decision.

     

    You made the decision to upgrade your cameras, part of that decision should have also included updating the software to use that camera. You are welcome to use the Canon software–for free–to process your images in your older software. The other alternative is to use the free DNG Converter (which Adobe doesn't HAVE to provide, but does, for free). The other alternative is to upgrade your software, and yes, that comes with a cost. So did your new camera.

     

    In point of fact, the advances to Camera Raw in particular are a strong reason for upgrading to Photoshop CS5/5.5. Call that an evil plot to force photographers to buy the upgrade, but i call is progress on the ability to get maximum image quality from your raw captures. I call that a good return on the investment.

     
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  • Noel Carboni
    23,524 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 17, 2012 2:37 PM   in reply to Jeff Schewe

    One point in both our responses that's worth singling out and saying again is that beyond adding camera support, the new features in Adobe's version releases DO add significant value in and of themselves

     

    As a current customer I'll go so far as to say that you may well have made a mistake to not upgrade to the latest release two years ago.  In my opinion even just the improvements in Photoshop alone are worth that entire price.  I plan to buy and download Photoshop CS6 the day it's released.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 18, 2012 9:45 AM   in reply to bigusmacus

    Not wanting to gang up on you, but there's another perspective on this:

     

    Many years ago, Adobe developed an 'Open Source' raw file format called DNG (Digital NeGative). Being open source, it means that the specification is available to all, and any manufacturer can use it without a licence (as far as I know). I know of at least two camera manufacturers that provide DNG format as a setting as well as proprietary raw, TIFF and JPEG.

     

    What this means in practice is that all camera manufacturers can make new cameras which will work with old software. But they don't.

     

    You should be shouting at Canon, and complain that they change the raw file format every time they release a new camera. Nikon is the same, as are other manufacturers. It's not Adobe's fault, and they give you DNG Converter for free.

     
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