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16 temp files from hell.

Nov 3, 2010 3:18 PM

Hi

 

For some reason a set of 16 temp files is created on my store drive (D:\) when i start up PS. its not the scratch drive. that is located on my ramdrive. these files are named "****_********_MVM_*.tmp" where the first and second line of stars is a random number while the last star is the numbers from 0 to 15. all the 16 files will be named the same but whith a different count at the end.

 

this is really bugging me since that disk is for storing ONLY (eco green crap 2tb drive), and it looks ugly to. anyway, all the temp files are at 0kb and i cant seem to find any way to 'fill them' so i have no idea what they are for.

 

what i want is to move them to a specific folder or at least another drive. A:\ in my case

 

--------

 

Adobe Photoshop Version: 12.0 (12.0x20100407 [20100407.r.1103 2010/04/07:14:00:00 cutoff; r branch]) x64 (CS5 Extended)
Operating System: Windows 7 64-bit
Built-in memory: 8183 MB
Free memory: 4488 MB
Memory available to Photoshop: 7183 MB
Memory used by Photoshop: 55 %
Video Card: NVIDIA GeForce GTS 250
Video Card Memory: 1024 MB
Application folder: C:\Program Files\Adobe\Adobe Photoshop CS5 (64 Bit)\
Temporary file path: A:\Temp\USERTE~1\
Scratch volume(s): A:\, 2,00G, 1,91G free  (RAMDRIVE)

 

C drive 25gb free (ssd)

D drive 1,5tb free (store)

 
Replies 1 2 3 Previous Next
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 4, 2010 12:30 AM   in reply to Psych0HoliC

    Doesn't look like Photoshop. PS' files are simply called PS***TMP.tmp or properly Photoshop Temp **************, depending on version of PS and file system of the scratch drive. This is coming from somewhere else, e.g. a service, a security tool or a third-party extension in PS.

     

    Mylenium

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 6, 2010 2:04 AM   in reply to Psych0HoliC

    They could have been security session files of the licensing service or some such thing and were probably stored there, because the global temp directory was inaccessible. that would match with your description of toggling UAC et al...

     

    Mylenium

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 29, 2010 1:33 AM   in reply to Psych0HoliC

    Hello,

     

    for some unknow reasons, I have the same problem.

    On my system, I have two internal hard drives, which are scratch drives for photoshop CS5. I have 3 external hard drives.

    Each time I open a file with CS5, it creates some .tmp files (same pattern than Psych0HoliC) on the 3 external drives.

    I'm on Windows Seven 7 64bits and this happens only with the 64 bits version of Photoshop CS5. With the 32bits version I don't have this problem.

     

    It's actually quite boring, since the external drives are often in sleep mode, so it takes a while to enable the drives, and some times it makes a windows I/O error.

     

    My UAC is set to 0, I tried to put it to 1 but it changes nothing.

     

    ++

    Bruno

     
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  • Noel Carboni
    23,469 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
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    Nov 29, 2010 4:56 AM   in reply to Psych0HoliC

    Do you play a racing game called "Man Vs Machine" by any chance?


    *_MVM_*.tmp files are reported to be temporary profile files/ racing names for Man Vs Machine games

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 29, 2010 5:22 AM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    Hi,

     

    no, I don't play any game, it's on my work machine. And those files ( ####_#########_MVM_##.tmp ) appear when I open one file in CS5 (not when I start the program), and disappear when I close CS5 (not only the file, but the main program).

    It's really boring, I must mention I don't have this with CS4 64bits. It's really due to Photoshop CS5 64bits.

     

    ++

    Bruno

     
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  • Noel Carboni
    23,469 posts
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    Nov 29, 2010 5:28 AM   in reply to Snugyo

    Boring or not, you should expect people to suggest things because it doesn't happen on every Photoshop CS5 64 bit system.

     

    I just opened an image and no *_MVM_*.tmp file appeared on my system.  So it's something that's different about your system.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 29, 2010 5:33 AM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    Of course, and I thank you for suggesting things, when I say it's boring, I refer to the behavior of Photoshop CS5 64bits, not the behavior of fellow posters.

    I should have mentioned that I have friends with similar system (seven 64bits, a bit less ram than me, I have 12gb, they have 6 or 8), and who do not experiment the same problem than me, so I know it's not a common problem. Still, common or not, it's boring

     

    Cheers,

    Bruno

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 29, 2010 7:18 AM   in reply to Psych0HoliC

    There has been an ongoing discussion on this topic in the Bridge Forum for some time now.  (http://forums.adobe.com/thread/679238?tstart=0).  There have been no conclusions as to where they come from.

     

    Since this threaed started I have seen the mmm temp files on at least 2 different drives.  All 0 bytes.  The appear in the root directory, even though this is not where the image files are stored.  I just delete them when they show up.

     
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  • Noel Carboni
    23,469 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
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    Nov 29, 2010 8:43 AM   in reply to Curt Y

    Hm, is every user seeing these files running Windows 7?  Notably I have Windows 7 Ultimate x64 with UAC turned off.  Notably also I don't run Bridge.

     

    The interesting thing is that, while I don't see any of these particular files, I *DO* see Photoshop spin up my external backup drive sometimes during application startup (I do not have this drive listed in the Edit - Preferences - Performance dialog).

     

    The presence of these temporary files doesn't seem like any sort of problem.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 4, 2010 8:07 PM   in reply to Psych0HoliC

    Well, those are not Photoshop files as far as I can determine.

    That leaves the OS, third party plugins, drivers, and malware.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 4, 2010 11:49 PM   in reply to Psych0HoliC

    I wasn't guessing, I was telling you: those files are not created by Photoshop.

    I can find nothing in the Photoshop code that would create those files.

     

    Again, you need to keep looking for what is creating those files.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 5, 2010 12:05 AM   in reply to Chris Cox

    I'll try on monday to determine what process could create those files. But that would be strange it's not PS CS5 64.

    I'm not using virtual drive, nor I'm using image drive. I'm just opening .tiff or .jpg files.

    As i previously said, those files are located on external drives only when opening a file in photoshop cs5 64bits (not when starting the program) and those file could not be removed until photoshop is closed, and when photoshop is closed, the files remove themselves).

    For information :

    I tried with illustrator cs5, it doesn't create such files.

    I tried with photoshop cs5 32bits, it doesn't create such files.

    I tried with photoshop cs4 64bits, it doesn't create such files.

     

    Tomorrow I'll try to use process explorer to see what handle this files, except if you have better suggestion.

     

    Best regards

     
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  • Noel Carboni
    23,469 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
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    Dec 5, 2010 7:15 AM   in reply to Snugyo
    function(){return A.apply(null,[this].concat($A(arguments)))}

    Snugyo wrote:


    But that would be strange it's not PS CS5 64.

     

    You are a True Skeptic.  Other people are telling you their installation of PS CS5 x64 doesn't create them, a top Photoshop engineer has told you the code can't create them...

     

    Out of curiosity, how many processes are running in your system right after you boot it up?  How many Add-ons do you have listed in Internet Explorer?

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 5, 2010 7:22 AM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    There is about 72 processes running, but the very odd thing is that thoses files are created only when opening an image in photoshop cs5 64b. they do not appear in any other situation. They also disappear when I close photoshop. I hope you are able to understand this coincidences make me skeptical?By the way I never said I don't beleive a "top engineer", I just say I'll check which process has handle to this file.

     

    And please, don't take this as a personnal offense, everyone could see this is a photoshop related problem, even if photoshop do not create the files itself.

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Dec 5, 2010 8:18 AM   in reply to Snugyo

    No offense taken, and I'm sorry if I seemed blunt.  I'm just trying to guide you into looking at whatever else is installed and running on your computer.

     

    You might consider using the (very good) free tools Autoruns and ShellExView to get a complete view of what's running on your system.  Also you might want to review all the non-Adobe plug-ins you have installed.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 5, 2010 8:26 AM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    I respect Cris Cox's messages, but I am also as skeptic.  There are many users, me included, that see the mmm. temp files file  such as this one on my dedicated internal scratch drive  (:///S:/4248_27721174_MVM_12.tmp).

     

    The people reporting the mmm temp files all run different programs,  and the only common thread is that they use photoshop.  I suspect it is generated within Bridge, but that is just a guess.

     

    Noel - Can you give me a search string that would bring up mmm files?  Even copying the above file does not bring it up in search.

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Dec 5, 2010 8:57 AM   in reply to Curt Y

    Try entering this in Explorer's search box:

     

    filename:*MVM*

     

    Keep in mind that Explorer's search is inaccurate and misses things sometimes.  It's a real failure by Microsoft in my opinion.

     

    Even better, install a freeware tool called grepWin.  From what I've seen it never misses anything, but it's a bit geeky to use.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 5, 2010 9:04 AM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    mmm* does not work.  Have tried variattions of it and none work.  Even a copy and paste of the file name does not work.

     

    Thought if I could get a search routine that worked, others could search their computers for mmm files.

     

    Does MS even search for temp.  Am using Win7.

     

    Message was edited by: Curt Y  that should be mvm, eyes tricked me.

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Dec 5, 2010 9:45 AM   in reply to Curt Y

    Microsoft has pushed this silly "Indexing" facility on us.  I call it silly because it's ridiculous to even think to pre-index an entire hard drive onto itself.  Either it will at least double the storage demands or the index has to exclude things.  They chose the latter, but how can they possibly know what you will want to look for?  Chances are what it excludes will be just what you'll be looking for (Murphy's law, and observed in real practice).

     

    Plus the logic is just plain wrong.  It cannot index nor find things in older Microsoft Word documents, for example.  If not those, then what do they think we want to search?

     

    Unfortunately indexing does nothing but muddy the water re: Microsoft Search results in Windows 7.  I personally have disabled indexing entirely, and without it Windows Search still functions - it becomes more of an actual SEARCH rather than some kind of database BS.  Plus indexing isn't using system resources all the time.  Plus there's an "atomic oplock" bug with indexing that can be devastating.

     

    Disabling indexing increases the chances of actually finding what you're looking for, but STILL not to 100%!!

     

    Microsoft Windows Search can be shown to miss files that clearly match search criteria, and (if you consider that a flaw) that makes it a failure no matter how you configure it or what syntax you use for the search.  The bottom line is this:  You cannot craft a Windows 7 search that will prove whether files do or don't exist on a given system - hence my reference to grepWin.

     

    I just searched my entire system with grepWin, with Photoshop CS5 x64 running, and I have no files as described above containing MVM in their names.  Notably I don't run Bridge.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 5, 2010 1:01 PM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    You could also use a utility to see what application/process has those files open.

     

    Yes, this may be *related* to Photoshop, but I don't see how they could be created by Photoshop.

    Again: third party plugins, other utilities (maybe even Bridge), the OS, etc. are all still possible.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 6, 2010 12:37 AM   in reply to Chris Cox

    I used Sysinternal's tool Process Explorer, last version available and made a handle search on the file pattern.

    Process Explorer says those files are handled by the Photoshop.exe process

    The research brings nothing else.

     

    I must say I'd be glad to provide more information, let me know if there's a specific tool I should use.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 6, 2010 11:24 AM   in reply to Snugyo

    OK, then that narrows it down to plugins, panels, or malware operating inside the Photoshop process.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 6, 2010 11:31 AM   in reply to Chris Cox

    And a plugin, pannel or malware who is not shared by the CS5 32 bits version.

     

    I'll try to see how I can manage to find out what it could be. I never installed any plugin, I changed preferences but never add scripts, brushes, actions, or whatever. I have nod32 who pretend to protect me against malware but we all know it could fail.

    By the way, do the other personnes experimenting the same problem also has nod32 antivirus ? Sometimes, the antiviruses create temporary files...

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 6, 2010 1:36 PM   in reply to Snugyo

    Snugyo wrote:

     

    By the way, do the other personnes experimenting the same problem also has nod32 antivirus ? Sometimes, the antiviruses create temporary files...

    I have some MVM files, but have no additional plug-ins, scripts, fonts, or whatever.  Use McAfee Security Center for anti virus.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 6, 2010 10:02 PM   in reply to Chris Cox

    Hi Chris,

     

    as I said here those files are created when f.e. the Lens Correction Filter or HDR merge was launched. It was 221 MB large when I launched lens correcting to a 100MB PSD (see the last allocation size statement in the dump of Procmon) and filled with zeros ;-)

     

    2010-12-07_064803.jpg

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 6, 2010 10:40 PM   in reply to ablichter

    Ok, that could be a VM file for the Mondo based plugins (like LensCorrection).

    And yes, it can be larger than the image, just like Photoshop's scratch files.  Space is needed for the original, and the filtered result, and intermediate calculations.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 7, 2010 12:20 AM   in reply to ablichter

    Hi,

     

    thank to your post I know I should have used process monitor instead of process explorer.

     

    mvm.jpg

     

    I must mention those events came right after I open a file (left.png, 183 bytes, on a 12gb ram system). C and E drives are ticked in the scratch disk, not F and G. Nothing was done on the file, simple opening (no filter, operation, script, or anything else).

     

    Don't know if that could help.

     

    Regards

    Bruno

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 7, 2010 12:55 AM   in reply to Snugyo

    Photoshop creates the scratch files on launch, and adds to them -- those are the PSTemp files, and only on the volumes you specify.

     

    Bridge can create database files, but not in the same locations and not tmp.

     

    The Mondo plugins can create temp files, usually on the OS volume in the TEMP directory.

     

    But I don't know of anything else in Photoshop that could create files with the names you describe at the times you describe.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 7, 2010 3:49 AM   in reply to Chris Cox

    Those files are always generated in the root of a volume and it's totally unpredictable on which.

     

    On my desktop at home, PS scratch is pointed to X:\, a dedicated partition. But there those tmp-files are spread to M:\ and N:\ when using HDR merge, which are storage disks for images and RAW only.

     

    I can confirm that openening a PNG does create them as well. Here Standard MultiPlugin.8bf is involved, seems it's Mondo plug-in.

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Dec 7, 2010 6:03 AM   in reply to ablichter
    function(){return A.apply(null,[this].concat($A(arguments)))}

    ablichter wrote:


    Those files are always generated in the root of a volume and it's totally unpredictable on which.

     

    Not true on every system.

     

    Armed with the new information (specifically that Merge to HDR Pro and Lens Correction could be responsible), I ran ProcMon and while capturing events (filtered on Process Name is Photoshop.exe) on Win 7 x64 Ultimate, I ran Merge to HDR Pro using Photoshop x64 12.0.2 and two images as input.

     

    Files with MVM in the name and matching the aforementioned pattern were observed being created in my temporary folder (C:\TEMP, which is identified by both my User TEMP and TMP environment variables).

     

    The specific file pattern was 6012_565852036_MVM_0.tmp through 6012_565852036_MVM_15.tmp, and they initially were accessed in numerical order.  These were created *just* after the plug-in file HDRMergeUI.8BF was read.

     

    MVMFiles.jpg

     

     

    Then about half a minute later, they were all accessed again, but this time in reverse numerical order (i.e., 6012_565852036_MVM_15.tmp through 6012_565852036_MVM_0.tmp).  Notably this followed not long after another temporary file, PhotoshopHDRtmpa06215.pfm was accessed, and the MVM file accesses were interspersed with writes to C:\$LogFile.  No C:\$LogFile could later be found.

     

    MVMFiles2.jpg

     

    For anyone investigating further, a ProcMon log file encompassing the entire Photoshop run above can be found here:  http://Noel.ProDigitalSoftware.com/temp/Logfile_Containing_MVM_Files.z ip

     

    Notably during the Merge to HDR Pro run, an "Updating Lens Database Cache" message was displayed briefly.

     

    The nnnn_nnnnnnnnn_MVM_n.tmp files were accessed only in the two blocks mentioned above, and were NOT left in my TEMP folder after the Merge to HDR Pro operation was completed and Photoshop was closed.

     

    Are these files a bother somehow?  They seem to me to be just transient temporary files.  Is it because they're showing up in unexpected places that they are being discussed?  Are they not being deleted under some conditions?

     

    For those of you seeing these files, what are the values of your TEMP and TMP environment variables?  Type SET T into a command prompt to check.

     

    C:\>SET T


    TEMP=C:\TEMP
    TMP=C:\TEMP

     

    C:\>

     

    Just a hunch, but perhaps you can set a deterministic folder for these files if you create a simple, short folder name containing no spaces for your temporary files and set your TEMP and TMP environment variables to point to it.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 7, 2010 6:04 AM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    Hi,

     

    here are my TEMP et TMP variables :

     

    TEMP=C:\Users\Guns\AppData\Local\Temp
    TMP=C:\Users\Guns\AppData\Local\Temp

     

    To answer if this files are bothering me. Actually they are.

    My F and G drives are external USB drives, and Win7 put them in sleep mode. When I launch Photoshop, and opening a file, the process of creating this files wake up the drives, and sometimes it creates this kind of error :

     

    Message de l’application : Adobe Photoshop CS5 Extended: Windows - Temporisation de périphérique expirée : Exception Processing Message 0xc00000b5 Parameters 0x000007FEFD86715C 0x000007FEFD86715C 0x000007FEFD86715C 0x000007FEFD86715C

     

    (sorry, french OS)

     

    Regards,

    Bruno

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Dec 7, 2010 6:07 AM   in reply to Snugyo

    I edited this into the above after first posting it, and if you're looking at the posts via eMail you may have missed it:

     

    Just a hunch, but perhaps you can set a deterministic folder for these files if you create a simple, short folder name for your temporary files and set your TEMP and TMP environment variables to point to it.

     

    Setting up C:\TEMP has always been a good strategy, ever since wayyy back.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 7, 2010 7:16 AM   in reply to Noel Carboni
    Not true on every system.

    conditional

    true on one 64 bit Win7 with only one partition, C:\temp;  files are in C:\root

    as well as on one 64bit Win7 with two partitions, C:\temp; files are on C:\root and D:\root

    and one 64bit win7, nine partions, C:\temp;  files are on M:\root and N:\root only, Not C: - D:, not on O: - R: nore X:)

     

    No files related to this issue in C:\temp

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Dec 7, 2010 8:06 AM   in reply to ablichter

    For what it's worth, I have C:, D:, and G: partitions.

     

    Interestingly, opening a .PNG file yielded a root access of my G: (external USB) drive just prior to opening the MVM files in C:\TEMP.  Possibly just coincidence.

     

    Did you reboot after setting up TEMP and TMP variables to point to C:\TEMP?

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 7, 2010 11:28 AM   in reply to Chris Cox

    I'm seeing these MVM files too; when I use liquify. They get cleared up when I exit liquify, and procmon shows PS witing to them - or in my case failing to do so as it's chosen a FAT drive to put them on and wants to write more than 4GB.

     

    It sounds like you're saying that they should be written to C:\Temp (I've created the directory and given myself full control but they still get written elsewhere). Presumably the fact that they are not is a bug..?

     

    thanks,

     

    ..rob

     
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