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Turn Compound Path Back Into A Path?

Jan 19, 2011 3:57 AM

Is there a way to do this? I recall finding a method a while back, but I have long forgtten it. If anyone knows I would appreciate the info.

 

Thanks.

 
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 19, 2011 4:04 AM   in reply to d.cloud

    There are 2 options for compound path:  Make or Release.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 19, 2011 4:11 AM   in reply to d.cloud

    And the options are in Object>Compound Path.

     

    markerline and I presume you mean The Original Paths rather then A Path.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 19, 2011 5:00 AM   in reply to d.cloud

    You're kidding, right?  Have you tried using the steps Mr. Bugge and I outlined above?  Look into your Layers palette to verify that your path is no longer a Compound Path after taking those steps.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 19, 2011 5:16 AM   in reply to d.cloud

    d.cloud wrote:

     

    Maybe I'm not explaining it right.

    You aren't.

     

    If you have multiple paths, they are either one object seen as a compound path, or multiple objects seen as multiple paths.

     

    You can not have multiple objects seen as a single path.

     

    And I have no idea what "regular path" means.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 19, 2011 5:35 AM   in reply to d.cloud

    To release a compound path you select the object and choose Object > Compound Path > Release from the menu.

     

    That will result in a path for each area of the compound path. The ONLY way to release a compound path and get one path is if you started with one path before making the compound path. If there is more than one component in the compound path you will ALWAYS, under all circumstances, get more than one path when releasing the compound path. That's the way Illustrator has always worked.

     

    That's essentially what everyone here has posted. If you don't believe the experienced users... good luck!

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 19, 2011 5:39 AM   in reply to d.cloud

    You dont' seem to understand... you are asking how to do what has NEVER been possible in Illustrator. What you want has NEVER existed. You are mis-remembering what it was you did apparently.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 19, 2011 5:46 AM   in reply to d.cloud

    d.cloud,

     

    What happens if you:

     

    1) Select the Compound Path,

    2) Apply the Object dropdown list from the top of the screen, mouseover Compound Path, follow the right arrow and click Release?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 19, 2011 6:05 AM   in reply to d.cloud

    d.cloud,

     

    Is that what you want, or how is it different?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 19, 2011 8:48 AM   in reply to d.cloud

    Maybe what you did to turn multiple objects into A SINGLE path object was to use the Pathfinder Object and use Weld but especially if they are not intersecting paths that only results in a GROUP, not a single path.  (Please do not belittle such contributors as SW and Jacob Bugge who have several thousand posts and have obviously helped people in the past come to solutions about issues they were facing with software)

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 19, 2011 9:25 AM   in reply to d.cloud

    Someone here is talking out of the back of his neck.

    A compound path is 2 or more paths or objects that have been united together to make "holes" (like for example the counter of an O).

    Here's an example:

    compound.jpg

    When you release a compound path you are in exactly the same place as you were before you made it: Two (or more, depending on the number of "holes") separate objects. Unless you grouped them beforehand they're all loose from each other and can be played with as you like.

    So Jacob and Associates should be listened to.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 19, 2011 10:49 AM   in reply to d.cloud

    I answered this already above. Look, I know you guys don't know how to do this so why not just leave it alone and perhaps someone will come along who does know how to do it.

    This is what you wrote above in response to Mr. Bugge . . . . if This isn't belittling, I don't know what is "Why Not Just Leave It Alone and perhaps Someone Will Come Along Who Does know how to do it".  Do you really think these forum members would have spent their time trying to help you if you give this type of response?  Think again carefully about how you choose your words.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 19, 2011 11:45 AM   in reply to d.cloud

    d.cloud wrote:

     

    I'm not going to dignify this with anymore responses.

    Sweet!

     

    This is just getting stupid now.

    Sure is, but do you know who patient zero is?

     

    If you take that remark as belittling then I don't know what to tell you. There is nothing belittling about it.

    It was certainly seen as belittling by at least one person here who tried to help you and has fully and completely answered your question.

     

    I was simply saying hey, look, I'm not getting the answer I came here looking for, so let's move along. Which is just what I'm going to do now.......

    You did get the answer you came here looking for, several times. You just didn’t get the answer you wanted.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 20, 2011 10:23 AM   in reply to d.cloud

    I suspect we have a troll ...


     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 20, 2011 10:37 AM   in reply to d.cloud

    Okay d.cloud, forget what everybody just said...now help me out here to better understand your problem.


    First question is: In your defination, what is a compound path?

     

    The reason I am asking this because I don't think everybody here is on the same page, so if you can tell me what YOU think a compound path is, then we might be able to find a solution for you.

     

    Thanks!

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 20, 2011 12:37 PM   in reply to d.cloud

    If the Release method is not achieving what you need, perhaps try selecting individual paths within the object, then cut (command-X) and paste in front (command-shift-f) or paste in back (command-shift-b). Then each will be a separate path. Or you could try ungrouping after using the Release method. Hope this helps.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 20, 2011 1:16 PM   in reply to d.cloud

    d.cloud

     

    Don't worry about it, we are not infalable.

     

    I believe you want to either expand the compound path, flatten the transparency or use the Unite filter in the Pathfinder panel.

     

    And you are correct they do not understand because thoughg you stated it correctly it is not the way the expect it to be stated,

     

    I did not read all of this since so if someone made the above suggestions and they did not work then I might also be misunderstanding you as well.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 20, 2011 1:23 PM   in reply to Wade_Zimmerman

    Hi Wade,

     

    I mentioned WELD above when I should have used the term Unite.  Weld is a process that is similar to Unite but is found in CorelDraw.  I mixed my programs up.  But in any case what you suggested still results in multiple paths or grouped multiple paths.  I think the user wants a single Path object for everything on the ArtBoard in question.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 20, 2011 3:05 PM   in reply to markerline

    I think the user's been drinking.

     

    And it's oh so nice for Wade to come in an insult everyone, without even reading the thread.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 9, 2011 2:05 PM   in reply to d.cloud

    I had the exact same problem, and found this high up in Google search results, so I thought I'd condense the solution I culled from this thread.

     

    Select the compound path.

    Hit Unite in Pathfinder.

    Go through with the Direct Selection Tool and delete any unwanted segments that have resulted.

    Joint points from seperate paths.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 23, 2012 1:43 AM   in reply to d.cloud

    I think I understand what dcloud was asking, can you make a compound path into a single "shape".  For example you type a capital "R".  You convert to outlines and this results in a compound path - the "R" and the "hole" at the top.  I think dcloud wants to flatten this so that the "hole" disappears completely.  If you use the pathfinder tools to cut the "hole" away - it appears gone but it's still a comound path as the release command still brings the hole back.

     

    Maybe dcloud was mixing up Illustrator and Fireworks - which allows you to subtract/punch a hole in a shape and then hit the "combine" button beneath the shaping tools to create one path (shape)??

     

    Following KnifeJob's solution results in my "R" as a solid path with no "hole".

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 23, 2012 6:34 AM   in reply to d.cloud

    D. Cloud,

     

    You simply need to stop clinging to something you evidently misunderstood in some tutorial somewhere and once and for all acquaint yourself with what Compound Paths are by reading and working through the actual AI documentation.

     

    If you still don't understand, then you need to figure out a way to state clearly and accurately (using the terminology of program's interface):

    • what you start with
    • what exactly you are doing to it
    • what you get as results
    • what you expect as results

     

    Screenshots would be a big help, because you are struggling with terminology and thereby not being clear. What you are saying you want to do simply does not make sense. The only way a Compound Path becomes a "regular path" is to release the compounding. There are multiple ways to do that. It can happen as a result of explicitly selecting the Release command, and it can happen automatically as a consequence of other operations. So if releaseing the compound does not do what you want and you think that means that "I just don't know how to do it," I assure you what it really means is you don't know how to state it.

     

    Beyond that, until you can clearly convey your issue, I can offer you these facts that may or may not help clear up some of your confusion:

     

    • Compound paths are nothing but special Groups which combine multiple paths (which, when compounded, are generically called subpaths) so that they occupy the same position in the z-stacking order. They share the same fill/stroke attributes as if one object.
    • If the winding rule is set to even/odd, then the subpaths reverse each other's fill where they intersect. If set to non-zero winding rule, they don't.
    • Compound Paths are not only for "making holes". Subpaths commonly do not intersect.
    • Compound Paths do not require more than one subpath. There's nothing preventing you from creating a Compound Path out of one path. If you do, the Appearance palette and the Control Panel will list it as a Compound Path.
    • In Illustrator, subpaths of Compound Paths do not have to be closed.
    • Compound Shapes (usually created in the Pathfinder palette) are entirely different things from Compound Paths.

     

    JET

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 12, 2012 7:42 AM   in reply to d.cloud

    Not sure if you're still wondering about this d.cloud but I did find a way, sort of. Make your compound path and take the knife to it. Breaks the compound path and keeps the shape, making one path. It's not perfect, obviously you end up with a slice through it, but it worked for what I was trying to do. Hope it helps.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 13, 2013 7:20 AM   in reply to d.cloud

    Hi there people, I expect you guys dont crucify me, but I have the same problem that d.cloud had. I'll try to explain it better and for this i'll use this image:

     

    step_to_step.jpg

     

    Step 1: There we have 2 circles, A and B. B is in front of A.

     

    Step 2: I had aligned B inside A.

     

    Step3: I used the pathfinder > Minus Front and got this result.

     

    Everything ok until now, the visual result of what I want is exactly that, BUT this shape (in step 3) is a compound path now, as we see below:

     

    unexpected.jpg

     

    I wonder if I needed this shape for making a logo, leave the compount paths on a logo is not the best think to do, right?

     

    Thats why I have the same problem that d. cloud had. Is there any possible way to convert this compound shape into a simple path? Or is there any other way for doing this shape giving the same result with a simple path?

     

    Thaks a lot guys!

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 13, 2013 7:42 AM   in reply to leandrogdsantos

    leandrogdsantos wrote:

     

    I wonder if I needed this shape for making a logo, leave the compount paths on a logo is not the best think to do, right?

     

    maybe there is a reason not to have a compound path, but I can't think of it.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 13, 2013 7:58 AM   in reply to dougofakkad

    So dougofakkad, you think there is no way to do that without using a compound shape?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 13, 2013 8:11 AM   in reply to leandrogdsantos

    what i said was that there is no reason _not_ to use a compound path. I don't really get the aversion to compound paths.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 13, 2013 8:16 AM   in reply to leandrogdsantos

    A compound shape is a different thing.

     

    Compound paths have been around for a very long time. The concept is implemented in about all vectorapplications and it works in fonts.

     

    Vinyl cutters should be able to deal with it, but mind the fill rules (search for that in the manual or on Google).

     

    Compound shapes in contrary are an Illustrator concept. They might or might not work accross applications. But when you're exporting to EPS or PDF they will be expanded automatically. Most probably they will be converted to a compound path then.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 13, 2013 8:48 AM   in reply to Monika Gause

    I understand and thank all you guys, but the only answer that I really need is if is there any other way of doing that (Step 3 result) without using a compound path.

     

    Again, thank you for the help.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 13, 2013 9:44 AM   in reply to leandrogdsantos

    can't you just make a circle and stroke it?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 13, 2013 9:56 AM   in reply to leandrogdsantos

    See Carlos. But actually it's not advisable for logos.

     

    You can't cut it.

    It might get scaled unproportionally if opened in other software or if scaled with unsuitable preferences.

     

    In the old days (that is about the time when men started to build hammers from stones) you made this like so:

     

    Bildschirmfoto 2013-03-13 um 17.54.15.png

    But that is not advisable, since when using it on a vinyl cutter it will make an ugly little cut into the upper part of the circle.

     
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