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PS CS5(64) OpenGL Drawing Not Enabled by Default

May 11, 2011 6:37 PM

Hello!  I have a PC I built last fall (PC2) I'm now grooming to be my main PC.  I'm preparing to rebuild my current main PC (PC1).  PC2 will soon have to do the heavy lifting.  PC2 has a performance problem;  I noticed when I was going through Photoshop CS5 (64-bit) preferences.  On the Performance page, GPU Settings area, Enable OpenGL Drawing is not checked by default.  (In my retiring PC1 Enable OpenGL Drawing is checked by default and the video adapter is listed in the area.)

 

I have this related oddity I hope we can troubleshoot:  When I drag to move or resize a window in PC2 only the outline moves or resizes until the mouse button is released.  (In my PC1, the windows move /resize as they are dragged.)  Any ideas where to start looking for the cause?

I had the identical nVidia driver on both PCs.  Just this afternoon I did a clean install of the latest nVidia driver, 270.61 on PC2.  It made no difference.

 

BTW, the motherboard, CPU, GPU (ZOTAC  ZT-98GES3M-FSL) and data HDD are the same model on both PCs.

 

Here's my PC2 List:
ASUS  P7P55D Deluxe  LGA 1156 Intel P55
CPU  Intel  Core i7-870  2.93GHz LGA 1156
DRAM  Corsair  CMX8GX3M4A1333C9  4 x 2GB DDR3 1333 (PC3 10666)
GPU  ZOTAC  ZT-98GES3M-FSL  GeForce 9800 GT 512MB 256-bit GDDR3
PSU  Corsair  CMPSU-750TX  750W
Drive 0  (O/S) OCZ  OCZSSD3-2AGT90G  3.5" 90GB SATA II
Drive 1  (Data) Hitachi  0F10452  2.0TB SATA 3.0Gb/s 7200 RPM 32MB
Drive 2  (Apps, Web site, Pgms & Updates) OCZ  OCZSSD3-2AGT90G  3.5" 90GB SATA II
CPU Heat Sink  ARCTIC COOLING    Freezer 7 Pro rev 2  92mm CPU Cooler
O/S  Microsoft  GFC-00019  Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit
Monitor  NEC   LCD2190 UXi  LCD 'twist' tech.

 

I'll appreciate any help that gets this resolved.

 

Thanks - Dave

 
Replies
  • Noel Carboni
    23,526 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
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    May 11, 2011 8:45 PM   in reply to DaveMcKeen

    It sounds like it might be a physical failure of part of the GPU in your second system.  Try swapping the cards between the system to see if the problem follows a particular card.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Pierre Courtejoie
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    Jan 11, 2006
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    May 12, 2011 5:04 AM   in reply to DaveMcKeen

    It looks like 270.73 fixes some openGL issues for the video applications, but it might only be available for QUADRO cards. Still, it's  worth researching.

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    May 12, 2011 10:52 AM   in reply to DaveMcKeen

    Honestly, I have not experienced a slowdown since my initial Windows 7 install, but then I have tweaked my Windows 7 setup a good bit.  That may say something I tweak avoids the slowdown you're seeing.  And I may know what...

     

    One thing I often advise people to do is to disable Windows 7 Indexing.  This virtually always frees up computer time and resources for your apps with very little downside (and even some upside).

     

    Somewhere here I have a thread where I describe exactly how to do that.  Basically it's a matter of stopping the indexing service, deleting the index, and setting a few other things so that they don't expect indexing to be available.

     

    Since I'm not sure where that thread has gone, I'll reprint some tweaks from the "how to" guide I've put together in subsequent posts here...  Give me a few minutes...

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    May 12, 2011 11:02 AM   in reply to DaveMcKeen

    Disable Indexing

     

    Indexing is supposed to make it quick and easy to find things on your computer using Windows Search (that little box at the upper-right of Explorer windows).

     

    But when you think about it, does it make sense to read all the files on your disk, extract everything you could possibly want to search for, and store it on that same disk another way?  To even consider indexing providing better performance than just searching the files, Microsoft must be picking and choosing the data they think you'll want to look for (excluding data you WON'T want to search for), where you'll want to search, and in what kinds of files, and in fact they are.  How could they know everything you'll ever want to search for? 

     

    They can't.  Not everything is indexed, and never will be!

     

    Try this:  Create a simple text file on your disk, in a temporary folder.  Call it "FindMe.log" and put in the text "This file contains important tax information".  Now navigate to that folder with Explorer and enter the word "tax" into the Search box at the upper-right.  Enter any of the words in that file!  Windows Search will not find the file, because it simply does not LOOK in .log files by default, and there's no fallback strategy - Windows Search simply does not index nor search for information for some kinds of files. Incredible!

     

    All it takes is ONE TIME searching for something you know is there and NOT finding it to destroy your confidence in Windows Search.

     

    And so they scan through your files endlessly, pick out the strings you might someday search for, and store them in yet another set of files (the "index").  As though your computer has nothing better to do.

     

    Not only is the basic premise of this wrong, but it's not even implemented very well.  The index often becomes corrupted, and so Microsoft has provided functions for you to clear and regenerate it.  Just what you wanted to be doing - NOT.

    Consider these shortcomings:


    • Some file types are simply not indexed or searched by default – e.g., .log files, and there's no fallback.  If you create a new file type no one's seen before, its contents will not be indexed.

     

    • Only strings they think you are likely to search for are indexed.

     

    • Because of poor implementation, indexing will miss things in some file types that are indexed – e.g., older Microsoft Word documents or files containing Unicode text (Microsoft's own invention).

     

    • Indexes often become corrupted and the Windows Search results fall out of date or it stops finding things entirely.

     

    • Indexing operations use computer time, increase disk wear, and interfere with your own access to your files.

     

     

    In summary, indexed Windows Search operations in Windows 7 simply can't be trusted to find your data in your files when it's critical, and so they're essentially useless.  Searching for filenames using Windows Search actually can be occasionally useful (though the syntax to ensure it searches only filenames is a bit tricky), but this doesn't require indexing.

     

    Moreover, indexing can actually interfere with file operations, causing your system to report disk corruption, because of an implementation error in indexing and NTFS (search the web for "Atomic Oplock", for example).

     

    So indexing should simply and utterly be disabled.  This won't actually stop you being able to try Windows Search - on the contrary with indexing off Windows 7 will actually search your actual files (within the limitations listed above) just when you tell it to, and (since indexing isn't implemented very well) it may actually INCREASE the probability that you might find what you're looking for.

     

    Here's how to disable indexing:

     

    1. Click Start and enter services in the search box.
    2. When Services (with little gears) comes up, click it.
    3. Scroll down to the Windows Search service.
    4. Right click it and choose Properties.
    5. Change the Startup type to Disabled.
    6. Click [ Stop ] to stop the service.
    7. Click [ OK ].
    8. Click Start and enter index in the search box.
    9. When Indexing options comes up, click it.
    10. Click the Advanced button.
    11. Click the [ Rebuild ] button to delete the index.
    12. It is a good idea to reboot after this.

     

    So your searches work properly and you're not nagged by Windows to reenable indexing:

     

    1. Open a Windows Explorer window.
    2. Choose ToolsFolder Options.
    3. Click the Search tab.
    4. Click the button next to "Don't use the index when searching in file folders for system files (searches might take longer)".
    5. Click Start and type group policy into the search box.
    6. When Edit Group Policy comes up, click it.
    7. Navigate to User ConfigurationAdministrative TemplatesWindows ComponentsWindows Explorer.
    8. Enable the Turn off Windows Libraries features that rely on indexed file data entry.
    9. If you do not have the Group Policy Editor on your version of Windows, change this registry entry:

      HKCU\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\Explorer

      DisableIndexedLibraryExperience = 1

     
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  • Noel Carboni
    23,526 posts
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    May 12, 2011 11:42 AM   in reply to DaveMcKeen

    Here's another performance tweak:

     

    Improve Disk Cache Efficiency

    Windows 7 does not enable one of its best features out of the box:  The ability to cache disk writes in RAM then write the data to the disk as efficiently as it can.

     

    Instead, Windows 7 runs with write-cache buffer flushing enabled by default. This essentially makes applications wait for the hard drive to finish writing their data before allowing them to continue, which slows things way down.

     

    They probably don't enable this feature by default because you risk losing more data on a crash or power loss.

     

    With this function disabled, however, and the full power of the disk cache brought to bear, the OS is free to batch together disk writes and schedule them to maximize throughput and minimize seeking.  You will hear a physical difference as the drive will not seek nearly as much.

     

    If your computer is stable and reliable, you have battery backup, and you have sufficient RAM, you can confidently disable write-cache buffer flushing to really speed disk writes up.  Do this for each internal disk drive for which you want to speed up access.

     

    To Turn Off Write-Cache Buffer Flushing

     

    1. Open an Explorer Window.
    2. Right click on your C: drive and choose Properties.
    3. Click the Hardware tab.
    4. Click on the physical hard drive for which you want to change the setting to highlight its name.
    5. Click the [ Properties ] button.
    6. Click the Policies tab.
    7. Check the box next to Turn off Windows write-cache buffer flushing on the device.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Noel Carboni
    23,526 posts
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    May 12, 2011 12:17 PM   in reply to DaveMcKeen

    Another tweak...

    Speed Up NTFS File Access

     

    When Windows accesses a directory or file on an NTFS volume, whether just for reading or not, it updates the "Last Accessed" time stamp.  Since many files are typically accessed in a read-only fashion, this results in a lot more disk writes than you'd expect.

     

    Very few programs rely on the "Last Accessed" time stamp, and if you don't personally plan to use it (via the Properties menu for a file or folder), then you can disable this update:

     

    Execute this command:

     

       fsutil behavior set DisableLastAccess 1

     

    Alternatively, add or change this registry value, if it is not already set:

     

    [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\FileSystem]

     

        "NtfsDisableLastAccessUpdate"=dword:00000001

     

     

    ---------------------

     

    The Windows 7 file system also still generates old 8.3 format file names for each file you store on your disk.  Unless you have old (ancient) applications that require 8.3 filenames, you can disable creation of the 8.3 format filename to increase performance a little more:

     

    Execute this command:

     

        fsutil 8dot3name set 1

     

    Alternatively, add or change this registry value:

     

    [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\FileSystem]

     

        "NtfsDisable8dot3NameCreation"=dword:00000001

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    May 12, 2011 1:32 PM   in reply to DaveMcKeen

    You do not need indexing on to be able to search the Start menu.  In fact, I find it works quickly and if anything more reliably with it off.

     

    Did you complete the very last steps of the "Disable Indexing" section, and have you logged-off and on again?

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    May 12, 2011 1:35 PM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    Oops, I noticed the second half of your question.

     

    If you need to, create a new Key under HKCU\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows called Explorer, then create the DisableIndexedLibraryExperience value.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    May 12, 2011 7:14 PM   in reply to DaveMcKeen

    Oh, I believe you that you're not seeing the search results.

     

    There's clearly something I've done that you have not - or a difference between Windows 7 Ultimate (which I'm running) and your version.  I don't really believe the latter.

     

    After having disabled indexing, did you delete the index?  Start - Control Panel, [Advanced] button, then [Rebuild] (which clearly will only delete).

     

    I'll be very curious to hear whether these tweaks boost your image generation process speed back up to what you saw before.  I suspect the disk caching will help a lot.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    May 12, 2011 7:28 PM   in reply to DaveMcKeen

    Very glad to hear these tweaks have helped speed things up.

     

    I probably won't be online any more tonight, but I will definitely scout around tomorrow to see if I can figure out what's different regarding our Search boxes.  I'm confident we can get it to work.

     

    Good night.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    May 13, 2011 1:13 PM   in reply to DaveMcKeen

    DaveMcKeen wrote:

     

    When we stop the Windows Search service do we not stop search results from showing up in Start/Search?

     

    No, I promise.  I would not stand for that.

     

    StartMenuSearch.jpg

     

    In your Search tab that you've shown above, try setting the "Always search file names and contents (this might take several minutes).

     

    This is what I have set:

     

    SearchSettings.jpg

     

    If changing these settings doesn't work, I suspect there may have been a problem with that Explorer key you had to add to the Registry.  Can you open that key and do a screen grab please?  Maybe something's not quite right there.  Here's what mine looks like:

     

    RegistryKey.jpg

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    May 13, 2011 6:10 PM   in reply to DaveMcKeen

    Nope, I see the problem.

     

    Your DisableIndexedLibraryExperience value in the registry is a string, not a DWORD.

     

    Delete it and add it again as a new DWORD value.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    May 13, 2011 6:43 PM   in reply to DaveMcKeen

    Did you log off and on again after making that change?

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    May 13, 2011 6:53 PM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    If the above doesn't work, I've some other information:

     

    Open Regedit and look in this HKEY_CURRENT_USER key:

     

      \Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\Advanced

     

    Look for these values:

     

      Start_SearchFiles

      Start_SearchPrograms

     

    Do they exist?  If so, what are their values.

     

    From what I've been reading, they should both be DWORD values of 0x00000002.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    May 13, 2011 7:02 PM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    Even something else to check...

     

    Under HKEY_CURRENT_USER:

     

      \Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\Explorer

     

    Do you see any values of the following form?

     

      NoSearchXXXXXXInStartMenu

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    May 13, 2011 7:25 PM   in reply to DaveMcKeen

    Change that Start_SearchPrograms value to 2.

     

    This is the meaning of the various values:

     

    Don't search: 0

    Search with public folders: 2

    Search without public folders: 1

     

    I don't think there are any public folders in the Start menu, but 2 seems the most liberal setting.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    May 14, 2011 10:50 AM   in reply to DaveMcKeen

    That's great news.

     

    I'll add checking that setting to my instructions for next time. 

     

    -Noel

     
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