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Serial Gooner 35
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Is it possible to get a computer for $1,100 that will run Premier Pro cs5.5 and After Effects CS5.5?

May 12, 2011 5:23 PM

I teach a video production class to 7th and 8th graders as an enrichment class. We are useing CS4 right now on a system that is painfully slow. I want to upgrade to CS5.5, but will definately need a new computer. My budget for the new computer is $1,100. Is it possible to get a computer for $1,100 that will run Premier Pro cs5.5 and After Effects CS5.5 smoothly? Or would I be better off to get a new system and stick with CS4? Thanks in advance for any input that you can give me.

 
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 18, 2011 11:58 PM   in reply to Serial Gooner 35

    This is tough: If you believe Newegg's pricing, you cannot get a system for $1,100 total without compromising on some of the components. (Or put it this way, you can get a build for $1,100 - but you'll have to settle for some components that might not meet Adobe's minimum requirements.) For example, a build with an i7-950, an X58 motherboard, 12GB (three 4GB modules) of RAM, a 750W PSU, a 320GB to 500GB hard drive plus four 1TB hard drives (all 7200RPM), a GeForce GTX 550 Ti, a Blu-ray burner and a roomy sturdy case would cost more than $1,400 (at Newegg's prices). That is the minimum that I would recommend for HD video editing. You could eliminate two of the 1TB hard drives, but that would still leave you with a system that costs about $1,300. Do not go for a single hard drive for everything including the OS as this single-drive configuration does not meet Adobe's minimum requirements (which call for a separate hard drive for media and projects in addition to the main system drive). In addition, current AMD CPUs are not recommended for HD editing in CS5.5 because they lack full support for the SSE 4.x extensions that Adobe makes good use of.

     

    And you'll either have to go custom-built or build it yourself for the recommended configuration. Pre-built (off-the-shelf) PCs in this price range are always equipped with one or more components that fall short (and in some cases far short) of Adobe's minimum requirements (largely in the drive setup).

     

    Message was edited by: RjL190365

     
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    May 19, 2011 3:43 AM   in reply to RjL190365

    What about this with 2 more 1TB hard disks for those 3.5" external bays?

     

    http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?E dpNo=57521&CatId=4928

     

    You may have enough left over to spring for one 8GB dual channel kit to up the RAM to 12GB.

     

    Yes you lose overclocking ability, but everything else seems to be there (except for maybe a marginal PSU after 2 disks are added, not sure how well the 450W would stand up, but I say give it a shot.) With those extra drive bays this machine should work just fine.  It has a green 1.5TB OS drive, but everyone says the OS drive rarely matters, so I'm not sure about that (I bought SSD for OS).

     

    Even if you had to buy a 650W PSU, a small OS 7200RPM drive, and 2 more larger drives, if you shopped around at techbargains.com and found deals, I'm sure it could be done.

     
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    May 19, 2011 5:16 AM   in reply to TyRip

    Ty,

     

    I was actually recommending four 1TB hard drives (with each pair in a RAID 0 array) in case any HD editing is performed.

     

    And that particular system that you linked to actually has all four of its DIMM slots occupied by 2GB DIMMs. So, at least some of the installed memory has to be "discarded" just to add more memory to the system. So, if even a single 8GB dual-channel kit and two 1TB 7200RPM hard drives are installed, it already comes close to or exceeds the $1,100 price point - and then, depending on the OP's home address, sales tax and/or shipping charges may be applied. And if a new PSU and/or additional drives are needed, it would exceed the $1,100 budget by even more.

     

    And because it's a big-box OEM computer with minimal if any tweakability and the fact that the OS drive has had a ton of bloatware pre-installed (and may not be uninstallable without severely corrupting the OS itself), plus the fact that the system uses an H67 chipset-based motherboard (which runs its PCIe x16 slot at a glacial x1 mode by default because the integrated Intel graphics cannot be completely disabled on that particular system) instead of a P67 chipset-based motherboard, don't expect that system to perform all that much faster than the OP's current system. In fact, that system as software-configured would have performed about 10 to 11 times slower than a fast Intel system even when properly tuned - and its MPE GPU performance would have been as slow as or slower than its software-only performance due to the shortcomings of that PCIe graphics card slot.

     

    Message was edited by: RjL190365

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 20, 2011 10:47 AM   in reply to Serial Gooner 35

    I put the trial version on my laptop and it works fine (I don't know what I'm doing, but anything I try goes quick, including saving).  My laptop was on sale last year at Best Buy for under $500.  It's a Toshiba Satellite L455. 

     
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    Jun 21, 2011 8:49 PM   in reply to Serial Gooner 35

    my friend just built one for $1,100, and it runs CS5.5 just fine it has a  sandy bridge 2600K processor(the K one lets you overclock if you want to) 12 BG ram --no raid but I don't have one and I do fine with my i7 920. This one last week a Compusa will work fine to start with also  it was $799 for a sandy bridge  i7-2600 3.4 GHZ 8GB ram  NVIDIA GT 420,  1.5 TB drive, (need to add 1 or 2 more drives, I just edit using a docking bay with no problems,) it was a Gateway  model #

    DX4850-57 PT GBL02-022 desktop

     
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