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garydphoto.com
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Building new computer

Jun 13, 2011 7:19 PM

I want to build a new computer with a budget of $1200 to $1800.  The question is: what shoul I look for in a chipset, cpu, amount of ram, etc. I beliive an Intel i7 2600 cpu, or an older i7 960 or 950 is a good start, The real question should be: "What does my CS5 really need to fly (especially Bridge) and what will be a good choice of hardware for upgrading the CSsoftware the forseeable  future"?

 
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    Jun 14, 2011 5:04 PM   in reply to garydphoto.com

    Not that I can remotely answer your question, but I am intrigued by how you figure this is a photography question that would fit in this Photography forum in the first place.

     

    ?

     

    Consider posting in the Photoshop forum for your platform of choice, Macintosh or Windows.

     

     

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    Jun 18, 2011 7:52 PM   in reply to garydphoto.com

    You may also want to have a look at this topic http://forums.adobe.com/thread/784009

     
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    Dec 29, 2011 1:19 AM   in reply to garydphoto.com

    I had the same issue with the large file sizes of my full frame digital Sony's, I went for a sandy bridge i7 amd 8 gig of ram with a solid state drive. It flies, so you could do that. Photoshop CS5 works fine on it, the onboard graphics chip in the i7 is all thats needed with Photoshop as Photoshop on its own dosen't use the special instructions that discrete graphic cards have, there have been comparrisons between the onboard chip and graphics cards with the onboard being faster than the slower cards UNLESS you are using a plugin that utilises these special instructions, I forget what they are called.

    be careful however to get a motherboard that has monitor outlets as the P67 boards such as mine don't have any way to connect your monitor as I discovered to my horror after I assembled it, never occured to me that it wouldnt. I had to use a card just to connect up. hope this helps.

     
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    Dec 29, 2011 9:07 PM   in reply to MGN3dog

    MGN3dog wrote:

     

    be careful however to get a motherboard that has monitor outlets as the P67 boards such as mine don't have any way to connect your monitor as I discovered to my horror after I assembled it, never occured to me that it wouldnt. I had to use a card just to connect up. hope this helps.

    On PC's it is a given to assume that the motherboard does not have video unless the specs state otherwise. In the graphic's world, A daughter card (video card) is preferable, first that the card is normally higher quality and second (most importantly) it is using its own ram instead of the ram on the mother board. As ram prices drop and 64 bit system become more of a norm, the latter may not be as important. But for now it still is.

     
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    Dec 29, 2011 10:22 PM   in reply to Silkrooster

    Yes its true that used to be the case, the i7 however has a good video chip built in and that trend is continuing. A good graphics card will beat it for the rather straight forward mathmatical computing needed in Photoshop but the inbuilt one can keep up with moderate ones. Not for games or Directx 11 shaders etc. Anantech did a comparrison and it proved to be interesting, I myself personally don't care as it was only meant to be an interim position before I could afford a new card. The Z68  boards can make use of the inbuilt but my P67 cannot. so it was a good choice for garydphoto. There have been some posts about needing lots of ram but I have not needed more than 8 gig so far, just running my 24mp files from my Sony A900's. Even a hundred or tree at once.If I find that I need more I will get more. I too run an SSd for the os and a 6gbs hd for the rest.

    Cheers

     
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    Dec 29, 2011 11:02 PM   in reply to MGN3dog

    As of Adobe CS4—and most certainly in CS5 and 5.5—Photoshop makes extensive use of the GPU and makes heavy demands on it.  Make sure that you get a video card with a driver that supports both OpenGL 2 and Shader Model 3.

     

    The Intel integrated graphics are a monumental POS, as far as I'm concerned.  Your mileage may vary.

     

     

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    Jan 23, 2012 4:00 PM   in reply to garydphoto.com

    Though this is an older thread, it's still fairly common a question, though probably not here.

     

    Now, as with most photography, Photoshop will be a major consideration. While it's not quite as demanding, as Adobe Premiere Pro, it is getting closer, with the GPU interfacing. Though geared more toward the systems to edit video, the Adobe Hardware Forum, is a very good place to start. One can probably eliminate suggestions, like RAID for HD video, but there are a ot of great tips.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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