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evil_kidd
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BEAT MATCHING

Jun 13, 2011 9:57 PM

Is there a tutorial or steps on blendin 2 songs together in adobe audition?

 
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  • SteveG(AudioMasters)
    5,602 posts
    Oct 26, 2006
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    Jun 14, 2011 1:56 AM   in reply to evil_kidd

    No, but I've put a link to this thread in the one about potential video tutorials. So one may turn up in the future!

     
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    Jun 15, 2011 11:51 AM   in reply to evil_kidd

    Actually, beatmatching in Audition is pretty easy. I do it all the time and have made some pretty great beatmixes for radio stations.

     

    Here's one of the ways how to do it:

     

    1. Mark out four beats in your drum loop or the track that you’re beat-matching  to. Make sure they’re exactly four beats, and the best way to do that  is make sure the selection marker on the start of the four beats is on  an identical part of the waveform to the end of the marker, four beats  later. Also, isten to them over and over in loop play mode. If they  sound right and look right, you should be fine.

     

    2. This is an optional – but to make it easier, I time/pitch  stretched the four beats to an exact time, so instead of 2.434 seconds, I  compressed it to 2.4 so it’s easier to remember.

     

    3. Highlight exactly four beats of the first song you’re mixing in to  the beatmix. It doesn’t have to be the first four beats of the part  you’re mixing – any four beats in the song – and your best bet is a  clean part of the song, usually the intro or first verse is good for  that.

     

    4. Open ‘Stretch’ and select time compression/expansion with the  pitch remaining the same. Type the length of the 4 beats of your  backbeat in to the “length” box. Then, copy down the ratio and press  close on the Stretch function.

     

    5. Highlight the whole waveform of the song and open the Stretch function again. Paste the ratio into the ratio box and hit OK.

     

    6. Repeat the process for every song you’re using in the mix.

     

    7. Your tracks are ready to beatmix! Place them right in the multitrack mode and play around.

     

    8. Done. Hope this helps

     
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    Aug 5, 2013 2:04 PM   in reply to Playtime22

    Playtime,

     

    It took me forever figuring out this forum to get to this point so I could ask you this, but here goes.  Re: Your 1st step in this process.  I know this might sound silly, but how did you create those initial 4 beats?  I mean, did you establish the exact tempo you ultimately wanted, play 4 stick beats on your keyboard with your piano/pads, make any timing adjustments, and boom, there's 4 beats?  Like I said, I know it sounds silly, but since all of the rest of it made good sense, I wanted to try it.

     

    I'd really appreciate your elaboration.

     

    Thanks,

     
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  • SteveG(AudioMasters)
    5,602 posts
    Oct 26, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 5, 2013 2:54 PM   in reply to George Lea

    Okay, Playtime hasn't been seen here since 2011, so I doubt (although I could be wrong) that he'll see this. But...

    George Lea wrote:


    Re: Your 1st step in this process.  I know this might sound silly, but how did you create those initial 4 beats?  I mean, did you establish the exact tempo you ultimately wanted, play 4 stick beats on your keyboard with your piano/pads, make any timing adjustments, and boom, there's 4 beats?  Like I said, I know it sounds silly, but since all of the rest of it made good sense, I wanted to try it.

    Reading his original reply, I think he's told you exactly what he did in step 1. He said 'Mark out four beats in your drum loop or the track that you’re beat-matching to'.

     

    So this means that you take the first track, and find a part of it where you get four beats of tempo clearly defined. This usually means listening the BD (which is how you identify them) and marking from that. There are a few other things you can do to check that you've got this right, as well - if you find the downbeat on several sucessive bars (so that would be 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 -1 - 2 - 3 - 4 -1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - etc, and time accurately between the ones I've highlighted, you can divide the time by 4 and arrive at a pretty accurate answer.

     

    What he's suggesting at this point is that you have to stretch or shrink all of the tracks you're going to beat-match so that this value you've got from the first one fits them all. At this point, you should be able to line them up easily, and even cut back and forth between them if you want to.

     

    If you want a way of doing this that might require less shifting per song, then get the tempo for all of the tracks you want first, and work out which one's in the middle of the range. Even if you don't use that one first, it's going to be at the right tempo when you do - if you see what I mean. The worst case with the previous scenario is that you pick either a relatively slow or fast track as a basis, and you have to alter everything else a lot to take account of that. But taking the timing from the one in the middle of the range means that everything else gets shifted less.

     

    HTH.

     
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