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Alex DeJesus 489 posts
Jul 25, 2008
Currently Being Moderated

CPU Temperatures High

Jul 6, 2011 11:09 PM

Just curious to know what is normal temp for CPU to be running. It is consistently above 90 deg celsius when AME is exporting H.264 from PPro timeline. No crash or failures. Temp returns to 40 degs afterwards.

 

System is newly built about 2 weeks ago:

 

Intel Core i7-2600k                 

ASUS P8P67 Pro B3              

ASUS GTX 570 Graphics         

4 x 4 GB RAM DDR3 Kingston      1600 HyperX T1

850W Pwr Supply Thermaltake

2 x 2TB Barracuda XT SATA III   1 for Captured media, and 1 for cache, pagefile, previews

1 Barracuda 1TB SATA II           for System OS

InWin BUC Chassis                  slots for 5 drives - 4 of them hot-swap

Windows 7 Ultimate           

Matrox MX02 mini             

Production Premium CS5.5

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 7, 2011 2:17 AM   in reply to Alex DeJesus

    Normal temps under load would be in the 60's, so either the cooling paste was not properly applied or the CPU cooler was not correctly installed or the airflow in the case is seriously disrupted. Which cooler is it?

     
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    Jul 7, 2011 7:26 AM   in reply to Alex DeJesus

    How high are you clocking the turbo and what is your CPU voltage set to?

     

    Eric

    ADK

     
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    Jul 7, 2011 10:13 AM   in reply to Alex DeJesus

    The Retail heatsink/cooler that comes with the CPU is really ineffective. You definitely want to switch to a 3rd party such as the V8. yes you want to apply some of the Thermal paste for the V8 cooler.

     

    Eric

    ADK

     
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    Jul 7, 2011 4:53 PM   in reply to Alex DeJesus

    You would want to have your CPU close to 100% utilization, but there are other factors here.

     

    With CPU, GPU, memory and disks all in play here, the weakest point in your setup usually is the component that is the most heavily taxed. Going uphill with a fully loaded car is generally not taxing on the brakes and only on the engine, but going downhill may be very taxing on the brakes. So it depends on what you are doing and what other components you have.

     

    Close to 100% utilization is desirable, as long as temperatures are in check and now in the 60's there is nothing to worry about.

     

    Overclocking the i7, a beginners guide

     
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    Jul 7, 2011 7:03 PM   in reply to Alex DeJesus

    If you are running 100% usage encoding the h.264 chances are that you are using MPE software as opposed to MPE Hardware Acceleration.  We do not know what h.264 format or even you source format but it sounds high to me.

     
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    Jul 8, 2011 6:00 AM   in reply to Bill Gehrke
    If you are running 100% usage encoding the h.264 chances are that you are using MPE software as opposed to MPE Hardware Acceleration.

    H.264 encoding and decoding is always done by the CPU.  Hardware MPE is never involved in the decoding or encoding of H.264.

     

    I'd be disappointed in Pr and my system if I didn't get 100% CPU usage during export to H.264, since that means the CPU is working as hard as it can to get the job done.

     

    -Jeff

     
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    Jul 8, 2011 6:16 AM   in reply to Alex DeJesus

    Any specific reason that you are not using the GPU/|MPE Hardware Acceleration?  It does speed things up.

     

    Jeff,  I just encoded a piece of my HDV (1080i) in CS5.5 and to H.264 YouTube HD widescreen.  It definitely used GPU Hardware Acceleration for (apparenlty) the PAR and scaling.

     

    Message was edited by: Bill Gehrke

     
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    Jul 8, 2011 6:20 AM   in reply to Bill Gehrke
    It definitely used GPU Hardware Acceleration for (apparenlty) the PAR and scaling.

    Correct.  But PAR and scaling occur before encoding.  GPU hardware acceleration is *not* used for the encoding to H.264.  All those calculations are handled by the CPU.

     

    -Jeff

     
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    Jul 8, 2011 6:26 AM   in reply to Jeff Bellune

    Maybe that depends on how you do it.  I closed Premiere and opened AME.  During the entire encoding process I had about 20% GPU usage and about 60 % CPU usage.  Maybe with direct export from Premiere it is different??

     
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    Jul 8, 2011 8:06 AM   in reply to Bill Gehrke

    There have been reports that encoding to H.264 with the AME takes longer than with Pr's direct export.  The lower CPU usage with AME may be why.  Regardless, MPE is a "playback" engine, not an encoding or exporting engine.

     

    -Jeff

     
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    Jul 8, 2011 10:57 AM   in reply to Jeff Bellune

    Jeff you are correct in that with the export from my file encoded directly from Premiere it was 5 seconds less than the 193 seconds it took in AME.  This was encoding my old no effects 1440 x 1080 HDV clip of 4 mins 52 seconds (292 seconds) in CS5.5 to the YouTube H.264 HD Widescreen preset.  But it appears to me that the Premiere direct export used more GPU and less CPU.  I would estimat that the GPU avearge usage inreased to about 30% and the CPU avearge usage went down to 50-55% with direct export (see GPU usage below)

     

    Contrary to your "MPE is a "playback" engine, not an encoding or exporting engine" in CS5.5 I think you will find that (according the Steve Hoeg) the MPE GPU is being used for; PAR, Frame Blending, Time Remapping, and Scale to Frame Size in encoding.  This is a significant change from previous information on CS5.

     

    HDV-GPU-Direct.jpg

     
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    Jul 8, 2011 11:59 AM   in reply to Bill Gehrke
    Contrary to your "MPE is a "playback" engine, not an encoding or exporting engine" in CS5.5 I think you will find that (according the Steve Hoeg) the MPE GPU is being used for; PAR, Frame Blending, Time Remapping, and Scale to Frame Size in encoding.  This is a significant change from previous information on CS5.

    Perhaps I could have worded that better.  All the factors you mention occur *before* the pixels in the video frame are converted into the export codec.  I'm talking about actually encoding a video frame to H.264.  Once the GPU hands off the frame to the MainConcept H.264 encoder, the encoding is done exclusively on the CPU.  The MC encoder gets a frame that has already been PAR'd, blended, remapped and scaled.

     

    I'd be happy to discover that the GPU now assists the MC encoder, since that would be a huge new feature for Pr and would make lots of people besides me happy, too.   But I don't think that's the case.

     

    Try your 1440x1080 (1.3333) HDV clip and encode it to H.264 Blu-ray using Match Source Attributes as the preset.  You'll get a 1440x1080 (1.3333) M4V file.  That eliminates GPU scaling.  I just ran a similar test here, and my CPU usage was between 70% and 80% the whole time.  My GPU usage during the export was 0% with hardware MPE enabled.  (No, that's not a typo: it was really 0%).  For reference, I'm using a hacked GTX280.

     

    -Jeff

     
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    Jul 8, 2011 12:05 PM   in reply to Alex DeJesus

    Here is a script that I could not live without since Microsoft stopped giving us full file created and modified times in Win 7.  It is called File Time.dat.  Download it and change the extension name to .vbs.  Just run the script and fill in the full path name to the file of interest and it will give you seconds readout of the file from creation to last modified time.  Note if you copy and paste it changes the modified time, not so with cut and paste.

     

    You could also download the EVGA GPU overclocking tool and it actually is slightly easier to read.  One good feature od the TechPowerUp tool is as you put the cursor over one of the tiny bars it will read that value for you.

     
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    Jul 8, 2011 12:57 PM   in reply to Jeff Bellune

    Jeff, I am trying your suggestion but while the Project Clip Properties and Timeline Clip Properties both show 1440 x 1080 the Export Settings Source is listed as 1920 x 1080 (1.0) How do I get that to show the real raw settings?

     
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    Jul 8, 2011 1:13 PM   in reply to Bill Gehrke

    Here's how it's set in CS5:

     

    1440BDExport.png

     
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    Jul 8, 2011 4:40 PM   in reply to Jeff Bellune

    Sorry Jeff but it took me a while to figure out how to do it.  When you create the project you have to create a anamorphic project,I always created a 1.0 PAR project with my HDV files.  And you are correct in that with anamorphic project and an anamorphic same size output there is no GPU action.

     
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